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The Info List - Cal Ripken, Jr





Calvin Edwin Ripken Jr. (born August 24, 1960), nicknamed "The Iron Man",[1] is an American former baseball shortstop and third baseman who played 21 seasons in Major League Baseball
Baseball
(MLB) for the Baltimore Orioles (1981–2001). One of his position's most offensively productive players, Ripken compiled 3,184 hits, 431 home runs, and 1,695 runs batted in during his career, and he won two Gold Glove Awards for his defense. He was a 19-time All-Star and was twice named American League
American League
(AL) Most Valuable Player (MVP). Ripken holds the record for consecutive games played, 2,632, surpassing Lou Gehrig's streak of 2,130 that had stood for 56 years and that many deemed unbreakable. In 2007, he was elected into the National Baseball
Baseball
Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility, and currently has the fourth highest voting percentage of all time (98.53%). Born in Maryland, Ripken grew up traveling around the United States as his father, Cal Sr., was a player and coach in the Orioles' organization. After playing at Aberdeen High School, Ripken Jr. was drafted by the Orioles in the second round of the 1978 MLB draft. He reached the major leagues in 1981 as a third baseman, but the following year, he was shifted to shortstop, his long-time position for Baltimore. That year, Ripken also won the AL Rookie of the Year Award and began his consecutive games played streak. In 1983, he won a World Series
World Series
championship and his first AL MVP Award. One of Ripken's best years came in 1991, when he was named an All-Star, won the Home Run Derby, and was recipient of his first All-Star Game MVP Award, his second AL MVP Award, and first Gold Glove Award. He broke the consecutive games played record on September 6, 1995, in his 2,131st consecutive game, which fans voted as the league's "most memorable moment" in an MLB.com
MLB.com
poll; Ripken voluntarily ended his 17-year streak at 2,632 games, in 1998. He switched back to third base for the final five years of his career. In 2001, his final season, Ripken was named the All-Star Game MVP and was honored with the Commissioner's Historic Achievement Award. Ripken is considered one of the best shortstops and third basemen in baseball history. At 6 ft 4 in (1.93 m), 225 lb (102 kg), he pioneered the way for the success of taller, larger shortstops. He is a member of the 3,000 hit club
3,000 hit club
and is behind Derek Jeter and Honus Wagner
Honus Wagner
for most hits by a shortstop. Ripken is a best-selling author and the President and CEO of Ripken Baseball, Inc., whose goal is to grow the love of baseball from a grassroots level. Since his retirement, he has purchased three minor league baseball teams. He has been active in charity work throughout his career and is still considered an ambassador of the game.

Contents

1 Early life 2 Minor league career 3 Baltimore
Baltimore
Orioles

3.1 1981–85 3.2 1987–90 3.3 1991–95 3.4 1996–2001

4 Charity 5 Legacy 6 Personal life

6.1 Business ventures

7 Awards and records

7.1 Awards 7.2 Records and honors 7.3 Baltimore
Baltimore
Oriole records

8 See also 9 References

9.1 Bibliography 9.2 Notes

10 Further reading 11 External links

Early life[edit] Ripken was born in Havre de Grace, Maryland, the son of Violet "Vi" Ripken (née Roberta) and Cal Ripken Sr.
Cal Ripken Sr.
He has German, English, and Irish ancestry.[2][3] Though the Ripkens called Aberdeen, Maryland, their home, they were often on the move because of Cal Sr.'s coaching duties with the Baltimore Orioles
Baltimore Orioles
organization.[4] Cal Sr., in fact, was in Topeka, Kansas
Topeka, Kansas
with one of his teams when his son was born.[5] Cal Jr. grew up around baseball and got started in it at a very young age.[1] He was able to receive instruction from players on his father's teams, notably Doug DeCinces.[6] He also got advice from his father, who once remarked to his mother that his questions were better than the ones reporters had.[7] At the age of three, Ripken knew he wanted to be a ballplayer and, at the age of 10, Ripken "knew the game inside and out."[7][8] Ripken and his brother Billy attended Aberdeen High School.[9] They both played baseball there; Cal also played soccer.[10] He has two other siblings, Ellen and Fred.[11] Ripken began his high school career playing second base; his coach, Don Morrison, said, "I was considering moving him to short, but I was unsure if his arm was strong enough."[12] Despite Morrison's concerns, Ripken did move to shortstop as a sophomore, combining strong fielding with a team-leading 10 runs batted in (RBI).[10] Needing pitching help, the Aberdeen Eagles began using Ripken as a pitcher as well in his junior year. He responded by striking out 55 batters in ​46 1⁄3 innings pitched with three shutouts while batting .339 with 21 hits and nine RBIs.[13] He was named the Harford County Most Valuable Player (MVP) while helping Aberdeen become county champions for the first time since 1959.[14] During his senior year, Ripken again had a strong season, lifting his batting average to .688 at one point and posting a 0.79 ERA with 45 strikeouts over his first 26 innings.[15] In the playoffs, Ripken pitched the state championship game against Thomas Stone High School.[16] The Eagles trailed 3–1 when Ripken, noting that rain was coming and that the game would be cancelled and replayed since the Eagles had not yet played the fourth inning, made nine throws to first base to ensure the game would be replayed.[16] When the game was played the next week, Ripken struck out 17, allowed two hits, and threw a complete game as Aberdeen won the state championship.[17] Minor league career[edit] Ripken was drafted by the Baltimore Orioles
Baltimore Orioles
in the second round of the 1978 Major League Baseball
Baseball
draft 48th overall. Despite a story written by SABR, Ripken was selected with the Orioles' predetermined draft pick, not through a forfeited pick from the Boston Red Sox
Boston Red Sox
after the Sox selected Dick Drago in the 1977 re-entry draft. The Orioles would select catcher Cecil Whitehead with the pick they received from Boston two picks after Ripken.[18] On deciding to go straight from high school to the professional level, he said, "When the colleges started coming around, Dad and I talked about mostly whether I was going to pursue a career in baseball. If I had the ability, the feeling was to get on with it, and if it didn't work out, start over again in college at 25 or 26."[19] Ripken played both pitcher and shortstop in high school; in fact, the Orioles were the only team not just interested in his pitching ability.[20] The Orioles decided to start him playing shortstop in the minor leagues, deciding it would be easier for him to transition back to pitching if necessary than it would be for him to start hitting again.[21] To begin Ripken's minor league career, the Orioles assigned him to the Bluefield Orioles of the rookie Appalachian League.[21] He batted .264 with 63 hits, 0 home run, and 24 RBIs, failing to make the league's all-rookie team.[22] In 1979, Ripken moved up to the Single-A Miami Orioles of the Florida State League. Shortly into the season, Miami manager Lance Nichols decided to move Ripken to third base, saying, "Cal was having some problems at short, so naturally I decided to shift him to third ... Third base was a perfect fit for Cal and our team."[23] On July 2, Ripken hit his first professional home run, a game-winner in the 12th inning against Gary Abone of the West Palm Beach Expos.[24] Ripken batted .303, hit five home runs, led the league with 28 doubles, and had 54 RBIs while playing in all 105 of Miami's games. He was named an All-Star after the season.[24] His performance earned him a brief call-up to the Charlotte Orioles
Charlotte Orioles
of the Double-A Southern League; Ripken batted .180 in a month with them, albeit with three home runs.[25] Ripken began 1980 with Charlotte. His manager at Charlotte, Jimmy Williams, predicted him to set the team home run record, and Ripken did not disappoint.[26] At season's end, he had 25 home runs, besting the previous record by four. He also had 28 doubles, 78 RBIs, and a .492 slugging percentage.[27] Ripken was named an All-Star while helping Charlotte win the Southern League championship.[27] In 1981, Ripken was added to Baltimore's 40-man roster. He attended spring training with the Orioles, but was sent to the Rochester Red Wings of the Triple-A International League
International League
to start the season.[28] At Rochester, Ripken played in the longest professional baseball game. Ripken started at third base and played all 33 innings against the Pawtucket Red Sox
Pawtucket Red Sox
(which featured another future Hall of Famer, Wade Boggs) in a game that took parts of three days to complete.[29] Ripken hit 23 home runs for Rochester while batting .288 with 75 RBIs in 114 games.[30] He was named the International League
International League
Rookie of the Year.[31] Baltimore
Baltimore
Orioles[edit] 1981–85[edit]

Cal Ripken Sr.
Cal Ripken Sr.
and Jr. in 1982

The Orioles were planning to keep Ripken in Rochester through 1981, but searching for improvement in the second half of the 1981 season, they called him up on August 7.[32] Manager Earl Weaver
Earl Weaver
planned to have Ripken take over the role of utility infielder Wayne Krenchicki, who had been sent down to make room for Ripken on the roster.[33] He made his debut on August 10 as a pinch runner for Ken Singleton
Ken Singleton
in the 12th inning of a game against the Kansas City Royals. Ripken scored on a hit by John Lowenstein, giving the Orioles the win.[34] His first major league hit came six days later against Dennis Lamp of the Chicago White Sox.[31] Ripken finished the season batting .182 without an extra-base hit as the Orioles finished fourth in the second half of the season.[35] Ripken received the third base job for the Orioles in 1982 when the team traded DeCinces before the start of the season.[36] He homered in his very first at bat of the first game of the Orioles' 1982 season against Dennis Leonard of Kansas City as part of three hits. However, he slumped to begin the season; his batting average was .118 through May 1.[37] Ripken looked for advice from several Orioles players and coaches but was most aided by advice from Reggie Jackson: "Just know what you know you can do, not what everybody else tells you to do."[38] After that, Ripken hit well for the rest of the season.[39] On May 29, Ripken did not play the second game of a doubleheader, the last time he missed a game until 1998.[40] On July 1, Weaver decided to permanently shift Ripken to shortstop, deciding that it was harder to find a shortstop who could hit than it was to find a third baseman who could hit.[41] Weaver said, "You never know. Rip might be a great shortstop."[41] Ripken hit 28 home runs that year en route to winning the American League
American League
(AL) Rookie of the Year Award.[42] Aided by Ripken, the Orioles contended for the playoffs until they lost to the Milwaukee Brewers
Milwaukee Brewers
on the final day of the season.[43] Ripken advanced even more in 1983, having what would be one of the best years of his career. He played well all season on the way to earning the first of 19 All-Star berths.[44] Roommate Rick Dempsey gave this analysis of Ripken's performance: "Certainly there were pitchers who faced him in 1982 and made or tried to make adjustments against him. But Cal was determined and worked hard to offset their adjustments."[45] At season's end, Ripken had set Orioles' records for RBIs by a shortstop (102) and hits by all players (211).[46] He led the major leagues in hits and doubles (47) while also leading the AL with 121 runs scored.[46] As a shortstop, he led the league in fielding percentage (.970), assists (534), and double plays (111), although he did not win the Gold Glove Award.[46] After the season, he was named the AL Most Valuable Player (MVP), hitting .318 with 27 home runs.[46] Ripken became the first player in MLB history to win Rookie of the Year and MVP Awards in consecutive seasons. Ripken made the playoffs for the first time as the Orioles won the AL East in 1983.[47] The Orioles defeated the White Sox in the ALCS before beating the Philadelphia Phillies
Philadelphia Phillies
four games to one in the 1983 World Series. In the series Ripken hit just .167 with no homers and only one RBI.[48] Although not contributing significantly in the World Series with his bat, he made a number of key plays defensively at shortstop, including the final out of the series on a Garry Maddox lineout in Game 5.[49] Before the 1984 season, Ripken signed a four-year contract for "about" $1 million a year, the largest contract the Orioles had ever given to a player of his age.[50] Again, he was named to the All-Star Game.[51] He racked up another fine season, batting .304 with 27 home runs, 86 RBIs, and 103 runs scored.[51] Although he failed to win a Gold Glove, he set an AL record with 583 assists.[51] The Orioles had a winning record but only managed to finish in fifth place.[51] Ripken's streak nearly came to an end in 1985. Against the Texas Rangers in the second game of the season, he sprained his ankle on a fielding play. Ripken finished the game, but afterwards Dr. Charles Silverstein ordered him to rest for 24 hours. However, the Orioles had an off day after that game, and Ripken was back for their next game.[52] During the season, Ripken was managed by his father when Cal Sr. filled in between Joe Altobelli
Joe Altobelli
and Weaver for one game on June 14.[53] Ripken finished the year batting .282 with 26 home runs and 110 RBIs while also leading the league with 123 double plays and 286 putouts.[54] During June 1986, Ripken recorded a 17-game hitting streak.[55] It was a tough season for the Orioles, as they finished last for the first time in their tenure in Baltimore.[56] In a speech to the team before the All-Star break, Weaver criticized the healthy players on the team for not hitting "Except [Ripken]. Do you know the kid hasn't missed an infield practice all year? Now, he's going to the All-Star Game."[57] He batted .282 with 81 RBIs, a drop partly because the Orioles scored 110 fewer runs than the year before. He was the first Oriole other than Eddie Murray
Eddie Murray
since 1979 to lead the team in home runs, with 25.[56] 1987–90[edit] Cal Ripken Sr.
Cal Ripken Sr.
replaced the retired Weaver as manager of the Orioles at the beginning of the 1987 season. That year, Ripken Sr. became the first manager to write two of his sons into the lineup card when both Ripken Jr. and his brother and fellow Oriole, Billy Ripken, played in the same game on July 11.[58] Later in the season, Ripken Sr. decided to take Ripken Jr. out of the game on September 14, in a blow-out loss to the Toronto Blue Jays
Toronto Blue Jays
at Exhibition Stadium. Ron Washington replaced him in the eighth inning, ending Ripken's streak of 8,243 consecutive innings played.[59] Ripken Sr. called the streak a "burden" after the game, saying, "I had to do it sometime."[59] Consecutive innings streaks have not always been recorded, but Ripken's remains unchallenged by historians.[59] Ripken finished the year batting a career-low .252, but he still hit 27 home runs, had 98 RBIs, and walked a career-high 81 times. He also recorded a .982 fielding percentage.[60] The Orioles considered having Ripken replace Ray Knight
Ray Knight
at third base in 1988, but they decided to keep him at shortstop.[61] After the Orioles started the season 0–6, Ripken Sr. was fired and replaced by Frank Robinson.[62] The Orioles started the year 0–21, with Ripken slumping as well to open the season.[63] He finished the year batting just .264, although he led major league shortstops with 23 home runs and 81 RBIs.[64] He also had a particularly memorable play in the All-Star Game, making a tremendous catch and strong throw to retire Will Clark
Will Clark
in the second inning.[65] Ken Rosenthal
Ken Rosenthal
of the Baltimore Sun called it "the gem of the evening."[65] During the 1988 season, Ripken had signed a three-year contract with an option for a fourth year, preventing him from being a free agent at season's end.[66] On August 2, 1989, he and Billy combined for seven hits against the Boston Red Sox, with Cal Jr. providing a game-winning hit late in the game.[67] That was an AL record for hits by brothers; the major league record was held by Lloyd and Paul Waner, who had eight on June 25, 1932.[67] Fifteen days later, he passed Steve Garvey by playing in his 1,208th straight game, moving to third on baseball's all-time list behind Lou Gehrig
Lou Gehrig
and Everett Scott.[68] Despite this accomplishment, Ray Robinson of the New York Times
New York Times
wrote, "Few regarded Ripken... or anyone else, as the successor to the Iron Horse."[69] The Orioles, after posting three straight losing seasons, contended for the playoffs most of the year before missing out in the final week of the season.[70] Ripken slumped in September, as he had only seven hits in his final 55 at bats.[70] He batted .257 in 1989 but was especially impressive for his fielding; he once went 47 games in a row without an error and finished the year with a .990 fielding percentage.[71] Ripken slumped offensively in 1990, batting .209 through his first 59 games.[72] However, throughout the year he impressed players and fans with his fielding.[72] On June 12, he broke Mark Belanger's Baltimore record for most consecutive errorless chances by a shortstop.[72] He went 67 straight games before experiencing what was originally scored an error on June 26.[73] However, official scorer Bill Steka decided the error was really Mike Devereaux's fault and changed the call the next day.[73] Ripken continued the streak to 95 games, breaking the Major League record for shortstops and setting the AL record for infielders other than third basemen.[74] On June 12, he also passed Scott to move into second place all-time for consecutive games played. The milestone came at Memorial Stadium; however, the fans booed him because of his offensive slump.[72] Ripken finished the year batting .250, leading the Orioles with 21 home runs, 84 RBIs, 150 hits, and 78 runs scored.[75] He and Billy tied for the team lead with 28 doubles.[75] Ripken committed only three errors in 1990, shattering the previous record of six in a season. Despite his fielding accomplishments, Ozzie Guillén, who had committed 17 errors, won the Gold Glove Award.[76] Some felt that Ripken should have won the award: Tim Kurkjian
Tim Kurkjian
called the vote a "crime", and Bobby Valentine
Bobby Valentine
stated that he was, "embarrassed by the actions of my peers."[76] 1991–95[edit] Ripken had a career year in 1991.[77] Through the All-Star break, his batting average was .348, making him the first shortstop to be leading the league in average through that point since Lou Boudreau
Lou Boudreau
in 1947.[78] He finished the season by hitting .323 with 34 home runs and 114 RBIs.[77] In addition, Ripken hit 46 doubles, stole a career-high six bases, and hit five triples while posting his career lowest strikeout rate and fewest strikeouts in a season with 600 or more plate appearances.[77] He became the first Major League shortstop ever to tally 30 home runs and 200 or more hits or 30 home runs and 40 or more doubles.[77] Ripken won his second AL MVP award, his first Gold Glove Award, the All-Star Game MVP Award (going two for three including a three-run home run off Dennis Martínez), the Gatorade
Gatorade
Home Run Derby contest (hitting a then-record 12 home runs in 22 swings, including seven consecutive homers to start the contest), Louisville Slugger
Louisville Slugger
"Silver Slugger Award", Associated Press
Associated Press
(AP) Player of the Year Award, and The Sporting News Player of the Year Award.[79] The only other player in MLB history to win all those awards in the same season, excluding the Home Run Derby, was Maury Wills
Maury Wills
in 1962.[80] Ripken was the first player to win the Home Run Derby and All-Star Game MVP Award in the same year.[18] As for his regular-season AL MVP, he was the first to win the award while playing with a sub-.500 club; the Orioles finished in sixth place that year with a 67–95 record.[81] At the end of the 1991 season, Memorial Stadium, the Orioles' home since 1954, saw its last MLB game against the Tigers. Ripken was the last Oriole to bat at the stadium, hitting into a double play against Detroit's Frank Tanana
Frank Tanana
on Oct 6, 1991.[82] During the 1992 season, Ripken and the Orioles tried to work out a new contract.[83] Several times throughout the season, Ripken endured batting slumps.[83] He said after the season, "I don't like to make excuses for the fact that I wasn't hitting, but I was distracted ... I just felt like the Orioles were playing mind games with me. Whether that was right or wrong, it was bothering me."[84] On August 22, Ripken finally signed a five-year, $30.5 million contract, the largest in baseball history at the time.[85] Ripken's slumps continued, and he was even booed by Orioles' fans late in the season.[86] He finished the year batting .251 with career-lows in home runs (14) and RBIs (72).[87] The Orioles contended for the playoffs much of the year, not getting eliminated until September 27.[88] However, he did win his second Gold Glove Award.[89]

Ripken preparing for a game in 1993

For the first time in Ripken's career, he became the only Ripken in the Orioles' organization, as the Orioles ousted his father as coach and traded Billy to Texas.[90] His slump continued at the start of the 1993 season, but Ripken managed to get out of it in May by adopting a taller batting stance.[91] Because of his early-season struggles, some criticized him for playing every day.[92] Bobby Bonds said of Ripken's playing every day, "That's idiotic. If I were his manager, he'd be out of there."[92] Oriole coach Davey Lopes
Davey Lopes
responded that only Ripken could tell whether or not he needed a day off.[92] On June 6, Ripken injured his knee during a brawl against the Seattle Mariners
Seattle Mariners
and was convinced for most of the next day that he would be unable to play.[93] However, the knee felt better at gametime, enabling the streak to continue.[93] Ripken achieved a personal milestone on July 10, when he collected his 2,000th career hit, during a game at Oriole Park at Camden Yards against Wilson Álvarez of the White Sox.[94] Because of Ripken's struggles, most managers and some sportswriters felt he should be left out of the All-Star Game in Baltimore
Baltimore
that year; however, the fans gave him over two million votes to ensure his spot.[95] Following the All-Star break, Ripken's hitting improved greatly, as he batted .300 with 14 home runs and 46 RBIs for the rest of the season.[96] He finished the year batting .257 with 24 home runs and 90 RBIs.[97] Before the 1994 season, the Elias Sports Bureau informed the Orioles that Ripken had surpassed Ernie Banks
Ernie Banks
for most career home runs as a shortstop with his 278th on July 15 against Scott Erickson.[98] Banks met Ripken at a ceremony on February 9 and said, "I'm extremely happy that he broke this record because it give me a chance to come back and be remembered too."[98] Ripken started the season strong, batting .340 with 19 RBIs through April.[99] On May 24, Ripken had six RBIs, including his 300th home run against Teddy Higuera, as the Orioles rallied from a 5–0 deficit to defeat the Brewers 13–5.[100] On August 1, he played in his 2,000th consecutive game, a 1–0 victory over the Twins at the Metrodome.[101] Through 112 games, Ripken batted .315 with 13 home runs and 75s RBI before the 1994–95 Major League Baseball
Baseball
strike canceled the rest of the season.[102]

The numbers on the Orioles' warehouse changed from 2130 to 2131 on September 6, 1995 to celebrate Cal Ripken Jr.
Cal Ripken Jr.
passing Lou Gehrig's consecutive games played streak.

Ripken's average fell to .262 in 1995; he hit 17 home runs and had 88 RBIs.[103] However, his season highlight came on September 6. Many baseball fans within and outside of the United States tuned into ESPN to watch Ripken surpass Lou Gehrig's 56-year-old record for consecutive games played (2,130 games). The game, between the Orioles and the California Angels, still ranks as one of the network's most watched baseball games (baseball's most-watched game was Game 7 of the 1986 World Series). Cal's children, Rachel and Ryan, threw out the ceremonial first balls. Both President Bill Clinton
Bill Clinton
and Vice President Al Gore
Al Gore
were at the game; Clinton was with the commentators on ESPN for the Orioles' half of the fourth inning and called Ripken's fourth inning home run. When the game became official after the Angels' half of the fifth inning, the numerical banners that displayed Ripken's streak on the wall of the B&O Warehouse outside the stadium's right field wall changed from 2130 to 2131.[104][105] The crowd in the stands, the opposing players and all four umpires gave Ripken a standing ovation lasting more than 22 minutes, one of the longest standing ovations for any athlete; ESPN
ESPN
did not go to a commercial break during the entire ovation. During the ovation, Ripken did a lap around the entire Camden Yards warning track to shake hands and give high-fives to the fans.[105] "Tonight I stand here, overwhelmed, as my name is linked with the great and courageous Lou Gehrig. I'm truly humbled to have our names spoken in the same breath. This year has been unbelievable. I've been cheered in ballparks all over the country. People not only showed me their kindness, but more importantly, they demonstrated their love of the game of baseball. I give my thanks to baseball fans everywhere. Tonight, I want to make sure you know how I feel. As I grew up here, I not only had dreams of being a big league ballplayer, but also of being a Baltimore
Baltimore
Oriole. For all of your support over the years, I want to thank you, the fans of Baltimore, from the bottom of my heart. This is the greatest place to play."[106] " Bobby Bonilla and Rafael Palmeiro
Rafael Palmeiro
pushed me out of the dugout and said, 'Hey, if you don't do a lap around this thing, we'll never get the game started.' I thought it was a ridiculous sort of thing ... but as I started to do it, the celebration of 50,000 started to be very one-on-one and very personal. I started seeing people I knew ... Those were the people that had been around the ballpark all those years, and it was really a wonderful human experience."[58] 1996–2001[edit]

Ripken in 1996 at Yankee Stadium

Ripken began the 1996 season slowly, but his playing improved as the season went on.[107] On June 14 at Kauffman Stadium
Kauffman Stadium
in Kansas City against the Royals, Ripken broke the world record of consecutive games played by playing in his 2,216th. The record had been held by Sachio Kinugasa of Japan. Kinugasa was at the game to watch Ripken break his record.[108] On July 15, Ripken was moved to third base as an experiment, with Manny Alexander
Manny Alexander
taking the shortstop position.[109] He was told the change would be permanent but was moved back to shortstop after Alexander had one hit in his six games at shortstop.[110] Ripken appeared in 163 games during the regular season in 1996, batting .278 with 26 home runs, 102 RBIs, and a .980 fielding percentage at shortstop.[103] He returned to the playoffs for the first time in 13 years as the Orioles won the AL Wild Card. In the AL Division Series, Baltimore
Baltimore
defeated Cleveland in four games, with Ripken batting .444 in the series.[103][111] His average fell to .250 in the ALCS as the Orioles were defeated in five games by the Yankees.[112] In 1997, the Orioles signed free agent shortstop Mike Bordick
Mike Bordick
from the Oakland Athletics
Oakland Athletics
and moved Ripken back to third base permanently.[107] General manager Pat Gillick
Pat Gillick
said that the move was made not because of problems by Ripken but because more defensive options were available at shortstop than at third base.[107] Had Ripken not wanted to move back to third base, the Orioles likely would have signed Tim Naehring instead.[107] Ripken was scheduled to become a free agent following the 1997 season, but at the start of the year he agreed to a two-year extension with the Orioles.[113] During the season, he suffered from nerve damage that at times kept him from being able to sit on the bench.[114] He did not miss a game, though, and batted .270 with 17 home runs and 84 RBIs as the Orioles again made the playoffs, this time by winning the AL East.[103][115] Ripken batted .438 as the Orioles defeated the Mariners in four games in the ALDS.[103] He batted .348 and hit a home run in the ALCS, but the Orioles fell to Cleveland in six games.[103] Ripken batted .271 with 14 home runs and 61 RBIs in 1998.[103] On September 20, before the final home game of the season against the Yankees, Ripken decided to end his streak at 2,632 games, having surpassed Gehrig's previous record by 502 games. Rookie third baseman Ryan Minor started in his place, at first thinking it was a rookie prank. Realizing that the streak was coming to an end, the fans, his teammates, and the visiting Yankees (with David Wells
David Wells
being the first to notice that Ripken was not playing during batting practice) gave Ripken an ovation after the game's first out was recorded. Ripken later stated that he decided to end the streak at the end of the season to avoid any offseason controversy about his playing status, and to end the streak entirely on his own terms while he still could.[116] Ripken returned to the lineup for the final seven games of the season, on the road against the Toronto Blue Jays
Toronto Blue Jays
and Boston Red Sox.

Ripken in the later part of his career

In 1999, Ripken had the highest batting average of his career, at .340.[103] Although he was injured at both the beginning and the end of the 1999 season and also mourned the loss of his father and former coach Cal Ripken Sr.
Cal Ripken Sr.
only a few days before 1999's opening game, he hit 18 homers in 332 at-bats (one HR every 18.4 AB's).[103][117][118][119] He had the best individual game of his career, going 6 for 6 with 2 home runs off John Smoltz
John Smoltz
and tying a club record with 13 total bases against the Atlanta Braves
Atlanta Braves
on June 13.[120] On September 3, he hit the 400th home run of his career against Rolando Arrojo of the Tampa Bay Devil Rays.[121] Ripken's 1999 season ended early due to injury when he was only nine hits away from joining the 3,000 hit club.[122] He achieved the milestone early in the 2000 season in an April game against the Twins at the Metrodome
Metrodome
when he singled off reliever Héctor Carrasco. Ripken had a good night at the plate, recording three hits, the third of which was the milestone.[123] Ripken missed all of July and August with a back injury. He was selected to the All-Star Game but sat out due to the injury, marking the first All-Star Game that he missed since his rookie season.[124][125] In 83 games, Ripken batted .256 (his lowest total since 1992) with 15 home runs and 56 RBIs.[103] In June 2001, Ripken announced he would retire at the end of the season.[126] He was voted the starting third baseman in the All-Star Game at Seattle's Safeco Field
Safeco Field
on July 10, 2001.[127] In a tribute to Ripken's achievements and stature in the game, shortstop Alex Rodriguez (unknowingly foreshadowing his own future) insisted on exchanging positions with third baseman Ripken for the first inning, so that Ripken could play shortstop as he had for most of his career. That move allowed Ripken to claim the record of most MLB All-Star Game appearances at shortstop. In the third inning, Ripken made his first plate appearance and was greeted with a standing ovation. Ripken then homered off the first pitch from Chan Ho Park. Ripken ended up with All-Star MVP honors, becoming one of four players in MLB history with multiple All Star Game MVP Awards (1991 and 2001) and the only player to be named All-Star Game MVP in two different decades.[128] The Orioles planned to retire Ripken's #8 in a ceremony before the final home game of the 2001 season, in late September. Ripken's final game was originally set to be played at Yankee Stadium; however, the September 11, 2001 attacks
September 11, 2001 attacks
led to the postponement of a week's worth of games. The games missed were added onto the end of the season's schedule. Since all the games the Orioles missed were at home, this changed the location of Ripken's final game to Oriole Park, much to the delight of Orioles fans.[129] On October 6, Ripken ended his career in the on-deck circle in the bottom of the ninth inning. Longtime teammate Brady Anderson, also playing in his last game for the Orioles, swung and missed on a fastball high and tight on a 3–2 count to end the game.[130] After the game, Ripken gave a speech thanking the fans for their support over 20 seasons.[131] Ripken was healthier in his final season than he had been over his last two, as he appeared in 128 games. He batted a career-low .239 with 14 home runs and 68 RBIs.[103] Charity[edit]

Cal Ripken Jr.'s number 8 was retired by the Baltimore Orioles
Baltimore Orioles
in 2001.

Throughout his career, Ripken has contributed his time and money to numerous charitable organizations. Following the signing of his new contract in 1984, Ripken announced he would distribute 1984 Orioles tickets to underprivileged children in Harford County, donate to the Harford Center, and donate to the Baltimore
Baltimore
School for the Performing Arts.[132] In 1988, he and wife Kelly founded the Cal Ripken Jr., Lifelong Learning Center, which is dedicated to teaching adults to read.[133] In 1992, MLB recognized him with the Roberto Clemente Award.[134] Ripken has made donations to many various charitable causes, including donations supporting research on Lou Gehrig's disease. After he broke Gehrig's record, the Orioles, along with private donors, created the Cal Ripken/ Lou Gehrig
Lou Gehrig
Fund for Neuromuscular Research at Johns Hopkins University.[135] Along with his brother Billy, he formed the Cal Ripken Sr., Foundation in 2001 to give underprivileged children the opportunity to attend baseball camps around the country and learn the game. The Foundation is a branch of Ripken Baseball.[136] In addition to controlling these camps and Ripken's minor league teams, Ripken Baseball
Baseball
operates for-profit camps and designs ballfields for youth, college, and professional teams.[137] He gives speeches about his time in baseball and some of the lessons he has learned. Between 2001 and 2004, inclusive, Ripken served as commissioner of the White House
White House
Tee Ball Initiative of President George W. Bush, in which capacity he worked to promote the value of teamwork amongst players and volunteership amongst the public and helped to teach tee ball fundamentals to teams of children at the White House.[138]

Ripken (left) is honored by the Orioles in 2007

In 2007, Ripken, along with Andre Agassi, Muhammad Ali, Lance Armstrong, Warrick Dunn, Mia Hamm, Jeff Gordon, Tony Hawk, Andrea Jaeger, Jackie Joyner-Kersee, Mario Lemieux, and Alonzo Mourning founded Athletes for Hope, a charitable organization, which helps professional athletes get involved in charitable causes and inspires millions of non-athletes to volunteer and support the community.[139] Ripken also announced a partnership with Reviving Baseball
Baseball
in Inner Cities, with the donation of US$1 million in cash and equipment from the Cal Ripken Sr.
Cal Ripken Sr.
Foundation.[140] On August 13, 2007, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice
Condoleezza Rice
announced that Ripken had been named Special
Special
Sports Envoy for the US State Department and that he would be going to China in October: "... we're just delighted that somebody of Cal Ripken's stature is going to be someone who will go out and represent America so well and represent what we consider to be American values, but universal values; that hard work and diligence and the willingness to really put it all on the line every day is something that kids need to learn", said Rice.[141][142] "A Shortstop
Shortstop
in China" premiered on the Mid-Atlantic Sports Network
Mid-Atlantic Sports Network
on May 8, 2009, chronicling Ripken's trip to China to share the game of baseball with youth and coaches while nurturing American-Chinese diplomacy.[143] The documentary included footage from the 11 clinics Cal and former Oriole B.J. Surhoff
B.J. Surhoff
held from Beijing
Beijing
to Guangzhou.[144] The documentary also showed Ripken accepting his appointment from Rice and featured a variety of interviews, from Ripken's wife Kelly to former Undersecretary of State for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs, Karen Hughes.[143] On May 31, 2008, Ripken received an honorary Doctor of Humanities degree from the University of Delaware
University of Delaware
and served as the university's commencement speaker.[145] On May 19, 2013 Ripken received an honorary Doctor of Public Service degree from the University of Maryland
Maryland
while serving as the university's general commencement speaker.[146] In an interview with Robinson, Ripken said, "My personal philosophy is to get a feeling of fulfillment through my work. I have a desire to create something. I guess that's why I've long been fascinated by two books, The Fountainhead
The Fountainhead
and Atlas Shrugged
Atlas Shrugged
[both by Ayn Rand]. The leading figure in 'The Fountainhead,' an architect named Howard Roark, is someone I've thought about a good deal."[69] Legacy[edit] At 6 ft 4 in, 225 lb (1.93 m, 102 kg), Ripken was a departure from the prototypical shortstop of the time—small, fleet-of-foot players who played a defensively difficult position but often did not post the home run and batting average totals that an outfielder might. Power hitting shortstops such as Alex Rodriguez, Nomar Garciaparra
Nomar Garciaparra
and Miguel Tejada
Miguel Tejada
are often seen by fans to be part of Ripken's legacy.[58][147][148] Nonetheless, Ripken demonstrated the ability to play excellent defense at shortstop, and as a result remained a fixture there for well over a decade, leading the league in assists several times, winning the Gold Glove twice, and, in 1990, setting the MLB record for best fielding percentage in a season at his position.[51][74][89] Though not a flashy fielder, Ripken displayed excellent fundamentals, and studied batters and even his own pitching staff so he could position himself to compensate for his lack of physical speed.[149] Ripken's legacy as a fielder is reflected by his place near the top of almost every defensive statistical category—he holds at least one all-time record (for either season, career, or most seasons leading the league) in assists, putouts, fielding percentage, double plays, and fewest errors. Ripken's career range factor was 4.73 (and as high as 5.50 for a single season), a mark few shortstops have reached.[103] Ripken's power, which led to records such as most home runs by a shortstop and 13th place in career doubles, had consequences. His propensity to drive the ball often led to his grounders getting to fielders quickly for tailor-made double-play balls. In 1999, Ripken passed Hank Aaron
Hank Aaron
as the player who had grounded into the most double plays in his career.[150] Ripken is third on the fielding side for double plays by a shortstop (1565, behind Omar Vizquel's 1734 and Ozzie Smith's 1590).[151] Ripken was also notable for never settling on a signature batting stance during his long career. Sometimes referred to as "the man of 1,000 stances", Ripken would change his stance in response to a slump, or if his current choice "didn't feel good."[152] When asked about his propensity for experimentation during an interview, Ripken responded that a batting stance, "was only a starting point."[152] A poll of fans by MLB.com
MLB.com
ranked Ripken's 2,131'st straight game the "Most Memorable Moment" in MLB history, leading such moments as Gehrig's farewell speech in 1939 and Jackie Robinson's breaking of the color barrier in 1947.[153] The writeup in the 1996 Sporting News Baseball
Baseball
Guide, which was written shortly after Ripken set the record, called the streak "what almost everyone considered the high point of the major league season."[154] In 2005, the Orioles honored Ripken on the 10th anniversary of his 2,131st consecutive game. After the top of the fifth inning, the numbers 2130 on the warehouse behind the stadium changed to 2131, just as they did on September 6, 1995.[155] Ripken has stated that he never felt comfortable being compared to Gehrig.

"Lou has monstrous numbers and was like Babe Ruth. How was it possible to compare him to me? But I realized what we did share is playing in consecutive games. It was still uncomfortable for me. When you're mentioned with him, I'm not sure you fully understand what it means."[156]

Billy and Cal Ripken are one of only four two-brother combinations in major league history to play second base/shortstop on the same club. The others are Garvin and Granny Hamner
Granny Hamner
for the Philadelphia Phillies in 1945; the twins Eddie and Johnny O'Brien with the Pittsburgh Pirates in the mid-1950s, and Frank and Milt Bolling
Milt Bolling
for the Detroit Tigers in 1958.[157] On January 9, 2007, Ripken was elected to the Hall of Fame, appearing on 537 out of 545 of the ballots cast (98.53%), eight votes short of a unanimous selection. His percentage is the fourth highest in history, behind Ken Griffey Jr.
Ken Griffey Jr.
(99.32 percent), Tom Seaver
Tom Seaver
who received 98.84 percent of the vote and Nolan Ryan
Nolan Ryan
who received 98.79 percent. Tony Gwynn, who was appearing on his first ballot as well, was chosen alongside Ripken. Both Hall of Fame-Elects were formally inducted on July 29, 2007.[158] The induction ceremony was attended by a record 75,000 people including special guests of Ripken: John Travolta, Kelly Preston, Steve Geppi, and Ron Shapiro (Ripken's agent during his career).[159][160] Ripken has received several tributes outside of baseball. On September 23, 2001, the NASCAR
NASCAR
Winston Cup series and MBNA
MBNA
renamed the fall race at Dover International Speedway in Dover, Delaware, naming the race the MBNA
MBNA
Cal Ripken Jr.
Cal Ripken Jr.
400. The race paid tribute to the legacy of Ripken, who was in attendance greeting the competing drivers as they crossed the stage during driver introductions. Driver Bobby Labonte had a special paint scheme on his #18 Interstate Batteries
Interstate Batteries
car featuring Baltimore Orioles
Baltimore Orioles
colors along with Ripken's retirement seal. The race was won by Dale Earnhardt Jr., who was then driving the #8 car. The race was also the first race held after the September 11, 2001, attacks as the race scheduled for Loudon a week earlier had been postponed in the wake of the attacks.[161] On March 30, 2008, I-395's eastern branch in Baltimore, from I-95 to Conway Street, was named Cal Ripken Way.[162] Because of Ripken's success during his career, he became a prominent advertising figure, appearing in advertisements for brands such as Nike, Chevrolet, True Value
True Value
Hardware, Wheaties, PowerAde, and other companies, some of which were small, Maryland
Maryland
businesses. These advertisements would often stress Ripken's "dependability, durability, and wholesomeness", linking that to their product. Ripken became an emblem to Americans through his hard work, loyalty to the Orioles, and his charity off the field.[163] Ripken was humble about his success, once saying,

I have talent, no doubt. My advantage is that I know the game well. The reason is that I grew up in it and had a good teacher in my father. I'm sure that whatever I am as a man and a ballplayer comes from the way I was raised. But am I a superstar? Oh, no. I don't think I stack up with the great players in the league. — Cal Ripken Jr., Macnow, p. 60

Author Glen Macnow responded to Ripken's comments by writing, "Anyone who has seen Cal Ripken Jr., play knows differently."[164] Personal life[edit]

Ripken in June 2013

Ripken married the former Kelly Geer at Towson United Methodist Church on Friday, November 13, 1987.[165] They have a daughter, Rachel,[166] and a son, Ryan.[167] Ryan, also a baseball player, was drafted by the Orioles in the 20th round of Major League Baseball's 2012 amateur draft.[168] However, he chose to attend college instead, beginning his freshman year at the University of South Carolina
University of South Carolina
in 2012.[167] He transferred to Indian River Community College
Indian River Community College
and was drafted in the 15th round of the Major League Baseball's 2014 amateur draft by the Washington Nationals. After being released by the Nationals in March 2017, he signed with the Orioles and was assigned to the Aberdeen Ironbirds, which were owned by his father and played at a stadium that bore his name.[169] It was reported on April 28, 2016, that Ripken and his wife Kelly had divorced[170] after a one-year separation. Ripken's mother, Violet Ripken, was kidnapped at gunpoint and safely returned on July 24, 2012. She was gone for 12 hours before her disappearance was reported to authorities.[171] On October 15, 2013, she was approached by a man with a handgun in a parking lot at the NBRS Bank in Aberdeen, Maryland. The man demanded her car, but she activated a key alarm and he fled. She was unharmed. Lt. Frederick Bundick, spokesman for the Aberdeen Police, said the two incidents appeared unrelated.[172] Ripken has written nearly thirty books, some of which are mentioned here.[173] After the 1996 season, he released an autobiography titled The Only Way I Know, co-written with Mike Bryan, which was a New York Times bestseller.[174][175] Following his retirement, he wrote several more, including Play Baseball
Baseball
the Ripken Way: The Complete Illustrated Guide to the Fundamentals, also written by his brother Billy and co-authored by Larry Burke, in 2005. He released the book Parenting Young Athletes the Ripken Way, co-written with Rick Wolff, in 2006 after seeing too many young athletes who he felt were being pressured unnecessarily by their parents. He said, "I was thinking, 'This just creates too much pressure on kids.' They need to find an environment in which they can explore their game ... without all these kinds of pressures being brought to bear. Once I started thinking about it, I saw we had more than enough to fill a book."[176] Then in 2007, he released three books, starting with Coaching Youth Baseball
Baseball
the Ripken Way, also written by his brother Billy and co-authored by Scott Lowe, which highlights 50 practice drills, topics include coaching responsibly, goal setting for youth, and effective practice planning.[177] Later, in April of that year, he released two more books: Get in the Game: 8 Elements of Perseverance That Make the Difference, co-written with Donald T. Phillips, described as a motivational guide to success; and The Longest Season, co-written with Ron Mazellan, a children's book about the Orioles' 1988 season.[178] In 2011, he released Hothead, a children's fiction book co-written with Kevin Cowherd which was also a New York Times
New York Times
bestseller.[179] In addition, he has been writing a weekly youth sports advice newspaper column in the Baltimore Sun
Baltimore Sun
since 2005.[180] In addition to his writing, Ripken himself has been the subject of several books. In 1995, Harvey Rosenfeld released a biography on him entitled Iron Man: The Cal Ripken Jr., Story.[181] Later, in 2007, Jeff Seidel released a biography on him entitled, Iron Man: Cal Ripken Jr., a Tribute.[182] A children's biography of Ripken, Cal Ripken Jr., Quiet Hero was published in 1993 by Lois Nicholson.[183] In addition, Ripken has been the subject of scholarly publications analyzing the impact of his career.[163][184] Business ventures[edit] Ripken owns several minor league baseball teams. In 2002, he purchased the Utica Blue Sox
Utica Blue Sox
of the New York–Penn League
New York–Penn League
and moved them to his hometown of Aberdeen, renaming them the Aberdeen IronBirds. The team is the Short-season Single-A affiliate team in the Orioles' system and plays at Ripken Stadium.[185] On June 28, 2005, he announced that he was purchasing the Augusta GreenJackets
Augusta GreenJackets
of the South Atlantic League, a Single-A affiliate of the San Francisco Giants.[186] At the end of the 2008 season, Ripken purchased the Vero Beach Devil Rays of the Single-A advanced Florida State League
Florida State League
and moved them to Port Charlotte, Florida, where they were renamed the Charlotte Stone Crabs.[187][188] On January 10, 2007, Ripken expressed interest in purchasing the Baltimore Orioles
Baltimore Orioles
if current owner Peter Angelos were to sell the team. He had yet to be approached about the potential purchase of the team.[189] Though he has not purchased them, Ripken was quoted in a July 17, 2010, Associated Press
Associated Press
article as saying he would consider rejoining the Orioles part-time as an advisor and full-time after his son graduated from high school in 2012.[190] In October 2007, Ripken began working as a studio analyst for TBS Sports during the 2007 Major League Baseball
Baseball
playoffs.[191] He has continued to serve in this role since then.[192] Ripken is on the Board of Directors of ZeniMax Media.[193] On February 28, 2008, Ripken announced his venture into the massively multiplayer online sports game market with "Cal Ripken's Real Baseball".[194] The Ripken Experience is a group of sports complexes. The first opened in Aberdeen, Maryland. A second location with nine baseball fields is located in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. Opened in 2006, it cost $26 million with $7 million more spent since then. A third location is set to open in summer 2016 in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee.[195] Awards and records[edit] Awards[edit]

Cal Ripken Jr.
Cal Ripken Jr.
exhibit at the Baseball
Baseball
Hall of Fame and Museum

Award / Honor Time(s) Date(s)

American League
American League
All-Star 19 1983–2001[103]

American League
American League
Silver Slugger Award
Silver Slugger Award
(SS) 8 1983–86, 1989, 1991, 1993, 1994[103]

American League
American League
Most Valuable Player 2 1983, 1991[103]

MLB All-Star Game Most Valuable Player 2 1991, 2001[128]

American League
American League
Gold Glove Award
Gold Glove Award
(SS) 2 1991, 1992[89]

The Sporting News' MLB Player of the Year 2 1983, 1991[80]

American League
American League
Rookie of the Year 1 1982[103]

Roberto Clemente
Roberto Clemente
Award 1 1992[134]

Lou Gehrig
Lou Gehrig
Memorial Award 1 1992[196]

Sports Illustrated
Sports Illustrated
magazine's "Sportsman of the Year" 1 1995[197]

Associated Press
Associated Press
"Athlete of the Year" 1 1995[197]

The Sporting News' "Sportsman of the Year" 1 1995[197]

Commissioner's Historic Achievement Award 1 2001[198]

Stan Musial
Stan Musial
Lifetime Achievement Award For Sportsmanship 1 2016 [199]

Records and honors[edit]

1995: Broke Lou Gehrig's consecutive games streak[105] 1999: Ranked #78 on The Sporting News' list of the "100 Greatest Baseball
Baseball
Players"[200] 1999: Elected to the Major League Baseball
Baseball
All-Century Team.[201] 2001: Uniform #8 retired by the Baltimore
Baltimore
Orioles[129] 2007: Elected to the Baseball
Baseball
Hall of Fame by 98.53% of voters, the highest percentage of votes ever for a position player, as well as third-highest overall.[158] 2007: Inducted to the Baseball
Baseball
Hall of Fame on July 29 with the San Diego Padres' great Tony Gwynn
Tony Gwynn
in front of a record crowd of 75,000 people[160] Most consecutive games played with 2,632[105] Most consecutive innings played with 8,243[59] Most home runs by a shortstop with 345[98] Most double plays by a shortstop in the American League, with 1,682[151] All-time leader in MLB All-Star fan balloting (36,123,483)[198] Most American League
American League
MLB All-Star team selections with 19 – 1983–2001[202] Most MLB All-Star Game appearances at shortstop with 15 – 1983–1996, 2001 Most consecutive MLB All-Star Game starts with 17[203] Most plate appearances by one player in one game with 15 (Triple-A game tied with Tom Eaton and Dallas Williams).[204]

Baltimore
Baltimore
Oriole records[edit]

Games played: 3,001[205] Consecutive games: 2,632[105] At bats: 11,551[205] Hits: 3,184[205] Runs: 1,647[205] RBIs: 1,695[205] Extra base hits: 1,078[205] Doubles: 603[205] Home runs: 431 ( Baltimore
Baltimore
has had six members of the 500 home run club on its roster, but none have hit more with the Orioles than Ripken)[205] Total bases: 5,168[205] Walks: 1,129[205] Strikeouts: 1,305[205] Assists: 8,212[205] Double plays: 1,682[205]

See also[edit]

Biography portal Baseball
Baseball
portal

Major League Baseball
Baseball
consecutive games played streaks DHL Hometown Heroes List of Major League Baseball
Baseball
individual streaks List of Major League Baseball
Baseball
career home run leaders List of Major League Baseball
Baseball
career hits leaders List of Major League Baseball
Baseball
doubles records List of Major League Baseball
Baseball
career doubles leaders List of Major League Baseball
Baseball
career runs scored leaders List of Major League Baseball
Baseball
career runs batted in leaders List of Major League Baseball
Baseball
players who spent their entire career with one franchise List of Major League Baseball
Baseball
annual doubles leaders 3,000 hit club List of Major League Baseball
Baseball
players to hit for the cycle List of Major League Baseball
Baseball
single-game hits leaders List of Major League Baseball
Baseball
annual runs scored leaders List of second-generation Major League Baseball
Baseball
players Season Ticket: A Baseball
Baseball
Companion

References[edit] Bibliography[edit]

Joseph, Paul; Gronvall, Kal (1997). Cal Ripken Jr.
Cal Ripken Jr.
Minneapolis: ABDO. ISBN 978-1-56239-638-1.  Macnow, Glen (2013). Cal Ripken Jr.: Hall of Fame Baseball
Baseball
Superstar. Berkeley Heights, New Jersey: Enslow Publishers, Inc. ISBN 978-1-62285-020-4.  Rosenfeld, Harvey (1995). Iron Man: The Cal Ripken Jr., Story. New York: St. Martin's Press. ISBN 0-312-13524-6.  Strazzabosco, Jeanne (1999). Learning about Work Ethic from the Life of Cal Ripken Jr.
Cal Ripken Jr.
New York: The Rosen Publishing Group. ISBN 978-0-8239-3028-9. 

Notes[edit]

^ a b Rosenfeld, p.3 ^ "Ripken Family Tree Ripken's roots run deep in Maryland, with hundreds of relatives – tribunedigital-baltimoresun". Articles.baltimoresun.com. 1995-09-04. Retrieved 2016-05-06.  ^ Childs Walker (2012-07-25). "Vi Ripken is down-to-earth center of Maryland's most famous baseball family – tribunedigital-baltimoresun". The Baltimore
Baltimore
Sun. Baltimoresun.com. Retrieved 2016-05-06.  ^ Rosenfeld, p. 2 ^ Joseph and Gronvall, p. 6 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 9 ^ a b Joseph and Gronvall, p. 7 ^ Strazzabosco, p. 5 ^ Rosenfeld, pp. 10, 60 ^ a b Rosenfeld, p. 12 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 6 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 10 ^ Rosenfeld, pp. 13–14 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 13 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 18 ^ a b Rosenfeld, pp. 19–20 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 20 ^ a b "2nd Round of the 1978 MLB June Amateur Draft".  ^ Rosenfeld, p. 22 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 25 ^ a b Rosenfeld, p. 26 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 30 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 31 ^ a b Rosenfeld, p. 33 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 34 ^ Rosenfeld, pp. 35–36 ^ a b Rosenfeld, p. 36 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 39 ^ "Mix future stars, Chill 33 innings, serve IL Classic". Toledo Blade. April 17, 2001. Retrieved July 6, 2014.  ^ Rosenfeld, p. 273 ^ a b Rosenfeld, p. 54 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 48 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 51 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 53 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 55 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 57 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 61 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 64 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 67 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 65 ^ a b Rosenfeld, p. 69 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 73 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 72 ^ Rosenfeld, pp. 77–78 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 79 ^ a b c d Rosenfeld, p. 86 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 83 ^ " Cal Ripken Jr.
Cal Ripken Jr.
World Series
World Series
Stats". Geisler Young. The Baseball Almanac. Retrieved July 30, 2007.  ^ Rosenfeld, p. 85 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 92 ^ a b c d e Rosenfeld, p. 99 ^ Rosenfeld, pp. 104–105 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 108 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 111 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 113 ^ a b Rosenfeld, p. 116 ^ Rosenfeld, pp. 114–115 ^ a b c Fordin, Spencer (January 9, 2007). "Ripken elected to Hall of Fame". MLB.com. Retrieved July 30, 2007.  ^ a b c d Rosenfeld, p. 130 ^ Rosefeld, pp. 132–133 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 136 ^ Newhan, Ross (April 13, 1988). "Ripken firing opens door for minority hiring". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved July 6, 2014.  ^ Reilley, Mike (April 18, 1997). "Ripken recalls 0–21 start". Sun Journal. Retrieved July 6, 2014.  ^ Rosenfeld, pp. 149–150 ^ a b Rosenfeld, p. 148 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 149 ^ a b Rosenfeld, p. 157 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 159 ^ a b Robinson, Ray (July 29, 2007). "The Iron Horse and Ripken". The New York Times. Retrieved July 14, 2014.  ^ a b Rosenfeld, p. 161 ^ Rosenfeld, pp. 161–162 ^ a b c d Rosenfeld, p. 167 ^ a b Rosenfeld, p. 168 ^ a b Rosenfeld, p. 171 ^ a b Rosenfeld, p. 174 ^ a b Rosenfeld, p. 175 ^ a b c d Rosenfeld, p. 187 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 182 ^ Rosenfeld, pp. 182–183, 188, 190, 192 ^ a b Rosenfeld, p. 192 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 189 ^ "Facts About Cal Ripken's Career". The Washington Post. August 22, 1995. Retrieved July 30, 2007.  ^ a b Rosenfeld, pp. 202–203 ^ Rosenfeld, pp. 203–204 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 206 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 210 ^ Rosenfeld, pp. 213–214 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 213 ^ a b c Rosenfeld, p. 214 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 215 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 227 ^ a b c Rosenfeld, p. 232 ^ a b Rosenfeld, p. 233 ^ Mark Maske (July 11, 1993). "Valenzuela Stays Hot, Cools White Sox; Orioles Charge to 6–0 Victory as Ripken Gets 2,000th Hit and Hoiles Homers Again". The Washington Post. Retrieved June 19, 2008.  ^ Rosenfeld, p. 237 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 239 ^ Rosenfeld, pp. 243 ^ a b c Rosenfeld, p. 245 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 248 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 249 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 253 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 259 ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p "Cal Ripken Statistics". Sports Reference, Inc. Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 30, 2007.  ^ " Cal Ripken Jr.
Cal Ripken Jr.
plays in his 2,131st consecutive game". CNN. Archived from the original on 2013-01-17.  ^ a b c d e "Sep 6, 1995: Ripken breaks record for consecutive games played". History Channel. Retrieved November 15, 2013.  ^ " Cal Ripken Jr.
Cal Ripken Jr.
Quotes". Baseball
Baseball
Almanac. Retrieved November 15, 2013.  ^ a b c d Olney, Buster (December 13, 1996). "O's move shifts Ripken to 3rd; 15-year tenure at short is over after signing of free agent Bordick; Ripken nod seals the deal; Gillick says changes help defense, pitching". The Baltimore
Baltimore
Sun. Retrieved November 19, 2013.  ^ "Ripken Ties World Record". The Spokesman-Review. Spokane, WA. June 14, 1996. Retrieved November 19, 2013.  ^ " Baltimore Orioles
Baltimore Orioles
8, Toronto Blue Jays
Toronto Blue Jays
6". Retrosheet.org. Retrieved January 10, 2011.  ^ " Manny Alexander
Manny Alexander
1996 Batting Gamelogs". Sports Reference, Inc. Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved November 19, 2013.  ^ Olney, Buster (October 6, 1996). "Extra-ordinary O's; Alomar's hit in 9th, home run in 12th win playoff series; Yankees are next opponent; Indians fall, 4–3, despite racking up record 23 strikeouts". The Baltimore
Baltimore
Sun. Retrieved November 19, 2013.  ^ Olney, Buster (October 14, 1996). "Yanks end O's wild ride; New York's six-run third finishes O's collapse at Camden, ends series in 5; Error, Fielder's HR are key; O's drop 3rd straight here; N.Y. back in World Series
World Series
for first time since 1981". The Baltimore
Baltimore
Sun. Retrieved November 19, 2013.  ^ Schmuck, Peter (April 3, 1997). "A case of delayed gratification; After 1 day wait, O's, fans blown away by good news in opener; O's BIG DAY: WIN, 4–2, SIGN RIPKEN, TOO". The Baltimore
Baltimore
Sun. Retrieved November 19, 2013.  ^ Strauss, Joe (November 1, 1997). "Ripken decides against surgery; Third baseman
Third baseman
says disk problem in back is on the mend". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved November 19, 2013.  ^ Schmuck, Peter (April 3, 1997). "After fine year, O's face large challenge; Baseball: The Mariners and Randy Johnson
Randy Johnson
are imposing opponents in the first round of the playoffs". The Baltimore
Baltimore
Sun. Retrieved November 19, 2013.  ^ Strauss, Joe (September 21, 1998). "After 2,632 consecutive games, Iron Man takes a seat". Baltimore
Baltimore
Sun. Retrieved January 10, 2011.  ^ Strauss, Joe (July 22, 1999). "Road rally has Mussina in Cy race; 2-run 7th, 4-run 8th lift O's by Red Sox, 6–1, give ace 13th victory; Martinez injury opens door; Ripken returns, caps 8th with 2-run single". The Baltimore
Baltimore
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Baltimore
Sun. Retrieved November 19, 2013.  ^ Kubatko, Roch (June 14, 1999). "Ripken leaves mark on Atlanta; With O's not returning until 2001, third baseman goes out with 6-for-6 bang". The Baltimore
Baltimore
Sun. Retrieved November 19, 2013.  ^ Strauss, Joe (September 3, 1999). "Rikpen milestone hits home; In 2nd game back, O's 3rd baseman hits 400th career homer; He's 29th on long-ball list; Ripken 'relieved' that HR quest is over". The Baltimore
Baltimore
Sun. Retrieved November 19, 2013.  ^ Strauss, Joe (September 26, 1999). "Ripken needs '00 for 3,000, but is that it?; Iron Man has said game will tell him when to quit, surgery notwithstanding". The Baltimore
Baltimore
Sun. Retrieved November 20, 2013.  ^ "Box Score of Game played on Saturday, April 15, 2000 at Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome". Baseball
Baseball
Almanac. Retrieved November 22, 2013.  ^ Strauss, Joe and Roch Kubatko (June 29, 2000). "Pain again drives Ripken from field; will he return? Nagging back places Oriole at crossroads". The Baltimore
Baltimore
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Baltimore
Sun. Retrieved November 20, 2013.  ^ Strauss, Joe (June 19, 2001). "Ripken to retire Orioles' Iron Man to finish season; 'Can't play forever'; A 'passion for what's next'; His youth initiative, family and direction of team guided move". The Baltimore
Baltimore
Sun. Retrieved November 20, 2013.  ^ Strauss, Joe (July 4, 2001). "Lasting impression: Ripken's stardust 3rd baseman relishes leaving 'mark' with 19th All-Star Game". The Baltimore
Baltimore
Sun. Retrieved November 20, 2013.  ^ a b "All-Star Cal Ripken magic: Retiring Iron Man comes through again as Oriole dominates his final All-Star Game". The Baltimore
Baltimore
Sun. July 12, 2001. Retrieved November 20, 2013.  ^ a b Apperson, Jay (October 7, 2001). "Final salute to Ripken ; Fans, dignitaries gather for last game of Orioles' Iron Man; Uniform number retired; THE RETIREMENT OF CAL RIPKEN". The Baltimore
Baltimore
Sun. Retrieved November 20, 2013.  ^ Lambrecht, Gary (October 7, 2001). "No last ups on friendship for teammate Anderson ; His strikeout ends game with Ripken on deck". The Baltimore
Baltimore
Sun. Retrieved November 20, 2013.  ^ "Ripken: Tonight closes a chapter of a dream". The Baltimore
Baltimore
Sun. October 7, 2001. Retrieved November 20, 2013.  ^ Rosenfeld, p. 93 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 151 ^ a b Rosenfeld, p. 202 ^ "Oriole Makes Donation to Ripken/Gehrig Disease Research Fund". Johns Hopkins University. July 24, 1997. Archived from the original on December 11, 2013. Retrieved November 20, 2013.  ^ "Cal Ripken Jr., Baseball's Iron Man, to Speak at Kent State Tuscarawas". Kent State University. October 8, 2010. Archived from the original on December 12, 2013. Retrieved November 20, 2013.  ^ "About Ripken Baseball". Ripken Baseball. Retrieved November 20, 2013.  ^ "Ripken retakes the field – for White House
White House
T-ball ; Ex-Oriole star looks on as league's commissioner". The Baltimore
Baltimore
Sun. May 6, 2002. Retrieved November 21, 2013.  ^ "Athletes for Hope". athletesforhope.org. Retrieved November 21, 2013.  ^ Maese, Rick (April 10, 2007). "Ripken a reminder of O's past success, current problems". The Baltimore
Baltimore
Sun.  ^ "Announcement of Cal Ripken Jr.
Cal Ripken Jr.
as Special
Special
Sports Envoy". U.S. Department of State Archive. August 13, 2007. Retrieved February 19, 2014.  ^ "Bush administration hopes Ripken will boost USA's image worldwide". ESPN. August 13, 2007. Retrieved February 19, 2014.  ^ a b "Official "A Shortstop
Shortstop
in China" program webpage". A Shortstop in China. Retrieved November 21, 2013.  ^ "An interview with the men behind Cal Ripken's 'A Shortstop
Shortstop
in China'". The Baltimore
Baltimore
Sun. May 7, 2009. Retrieved February 19, 2014.  ^ " Cal Ripken Jr.
Cal Ripken Jr.
to speak at UD graduation". Delaware Online. April 8, 2008. Retrieved November 21, 2013.  ^ "Ripken gets honorary degree as University of Md. graduates 7,700". The Baltimore
Baltimore
Sun. May 19, 2013.  ^ Schmuck, Peter (September 4, 1999). "Ripken HRs do number at short; His power path to 400 remade position for Jeters, Rodriguezes; CAL RIPKEN : 400 HOME RUNS". The Baltimore
Baltimore
Sun. Retrieved November 19, 2013.  ^ O'Connell, Jack (December 28, 2006). "Ripken's career more than numbers". MLB.com. Retrieved July 30, 2007.  ^ Rosenfeld, p. 175–176 ^ "Career Leaders & Records for Double Plays Grounded Into". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports-Reference, Inc. Retrieved November 22, 2013.  ^ a b "Career Leaders & Records for Double Plays Turned as SS". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports-Reference, Inc. Retrieved November 22, 2013.  ^ a b "Video CSN Mid-Atlantic". Csnwashington.com. 2016-04-22. Retrieved 2016-05-06.  ^ "Major League Baseball
Baseball
Memorable Moments". MLB.com. Retrieved July 30, 2007.  ^ 1996 Sporting News Baseball
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Guide, published by The Sporting News ^ Connolly, Dan (September 7, 2005). "An encore for Ripken ; Iron Man, small crowd gladly revisit the past; THE STREAK: 10 YEARS LATER". The Baltimore
Baltimore
Sun. Retrieved November 21, 2013.  ^ Curry, Jack (September 11, 2009). "Jeter's Pursuit of Gehrig Recalls Ripken's Streak". The New York Times. Retrieved July 14, 2014.  ^ "Milt Bolling". BaseballLibrary.com. Archived from the original on October 12, 2012. Retrieved November 22, 2013.  ^ a b Bloom, Barry M. (January 9, 2007). "The Hall call arrives for Gwynn, Ripken". MLB.com. Retrieved July 30, 2007.  ^ Connolly, Dan (July 28, 2007). "This weekend began months ago". The Baltimore
Baltimore
Sun. Retrieved November 21, 2013.  ^ a b Newman, Mark (July 29, 2007). "Hall of Fame welcomes two class acts". MLB.com. Retrieved November 21, 2013.  ^ McKee, Sandra (September 24, 2001). "Earnhardt Jr. delivers when it counts ; Winning Ripken Jr. 400 is a fitting conclusion to emotional afternoon". The Baltimore
Baltimore
Sun. Retrieved November 19, 2013.  ^ "Showind Drivers the Ripken Way". The Baltimore
Baltimore
Sun. May 31, 2008. Retrieved November 20, 2013.  ^ a b Nathan, David A. and Mary G. McDonald. "Yearning for Yesteryear: Cal Ripken Jr., The Streak, And the Politics of Nostalgia". journals.ku.edu. Retrieved May 5, 2014.  ^ Macnow, p. 60 ^ Rosenfeld, p. 134 ^ Peter Barzilai, Cal Ripken Jr.
Cal Ripken Jr.
considers return to Orioles organization, USA Today
USA Today
(July 14, 2010). Retrieved on March 17, 2012. ^ a b McKee, Sandra (November 14, 2011). In 2016, Ryan started playing for the Hagerstown Suns as a first baseman. The Hagerstown Suns, an affiliate of the Washington Nationals. Ryan Ripken looking for 'new adventures' at South Carolina[permanent dead link]. The Baltimore
Baltimore
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Sun. Retrieved 2016-05-06.  ^ Wenger, Fenton and Hare, Yvonner, Justin and Mary Gail (July 25, 2012). "Vi Ripken abducted at gunpoint, return quietly". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved July 26, 2012.  ^ "Cal Ripken's mom has brush with gunman". CBS News. Retrieved October 16, 2013.  ^ "Books by Cal Ripken Jr". goodreads.com. Retrieved May 5, 2014.  ^ Jack O'Connell, "Cal Ripken Jr., Lou Gehrig
Lou Gehrig
Reunite in Hallowed Hall of Fame", Memories and Dreams, (Induction 2007, Volume 29, Number 4), page 15. ^ "Cal Ripken Jr". CAA Speakers. Retrieved May 5, 2014.  ^ Pitts, Jonathan (April 8, 2006). "'The Ripken Way' for parents". The Baltimore
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Sun. Retrieved May 5, 2014.  ^ Ripken Jr., Cal (2007). Coaching Youth Baseball
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the Ripken Way. Human Kinetics. p. 264. ISBN 978-0-7360-6782-9.  ^ Miller, Matthew (April 17, 2007). " Cal Ripken Jr.
Cal Ripken Jr.
is on another streak". NBC News. Retrieved May 5, 2014.  ^ "Best Sellers". The New York Times. March 27, 2011. Retrieved May 5, 2014.  ^ Madigan, Nick (October 14, 2005). "Ripken to offer advice in column in The Sun". The Baltimore
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Sun. Retrieved November 21, 2013.  ^ Rosenfeld, Acknowledgements ^ Chapter, Bob Davids (February 25, 2009). "Past Talkin' Baseballs". Society for American Baseball
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Sun. Retrieved November 21, 2013.  ^ "Team History Augusta GreenJackets
Augusta GreenJackets
About Us". milb.com. Retrieved August 13, 2011.  ^ Czerwinski, Kevin T. (August 8, 2008). "Ripken Baseball
Baseball
buys Vero Beach franchise". milb.com. Retrieved July 13, 2009.  ^ Official Charlotte Stone Crabs
Charlotte Stone Crabs
website. milb.com. Retrieved November 21, 2013 ^ "Ripken interested in buying Orioles". ESPN. January 10, 2007. Retrieved November 21, 2013.  ^ " Cal Ripken Jr.
Cal Ripken Jr.
could return to Baltimore Orioles
Baltimore Orioles
as part-time adviser". ESPN. July 14, 2010. Retrieved August 13, 2011.  ^ "Cal Ripken Jr". TBS Sports. Archived from the original on July 28, 2013. Retrieved November 21, 2013.  ^ Newman, Mark (September 26, 2013). "TBS to feature robust postseason coverage". MLB.com. Retrieved November 21, 2013.  ^ "Board of Directors". ZeniMax Media. Retrieved November 21, 2013.  ^ Sharrow, Ryan (February 28, 2008). " Cal Ripken Jr.
Cal Ripken Jr.
goes to bat for online video game". Baltimore
Baltimore
Business Journal. Retrieved February 20, 2014.  ^ Young, Ryan (July 5, 2015). "Ripken proud of Myrtle Beach baseball complex's growth". The Sun News. Retrieved July 6, 2015.  ^ Rosenfeld, p. 220 ^ a b c Kent, Milton (February 13, 1996). "A 'flattered' Cal Ripken adds to his treasure chest of awards". The Baltimore
Baltimore
Sun. Retrieved November 22, 2013.  ^ a b " Baseball
Baseball
begins to bid farewell to Ripken, Gwynn". CNNSI.com. CNN / Sports Illustrated. Associated Press. July 10, 2001. Archived from the original on 2012-10-25. Retrieved September 25, 2009.  ^ "Cal Ripken jr". stlsport.org. stlsports. 2016. Retrieved November 7, 2016.  ^ "Baseball's 100 Greatest Players". Baseball
Baseball
Almanac. Retrieved November 22, 2013.  ^ "All Century Team". Baseball
Baseball
Almanac. Retrieved November 28, 2011.  ^ McCarron, Anthony (July 14, 2008). " Alex Rodriguez
Alex Rodriguez
fondly recalls 2001 All-Star tribute to Cal Ripken Jr". New York Daily News. Retrieved November 22, 2013.  ^ "The Ballplayers – Cal Ripken Jr". BaseballLibrary.com. Archived from the original on October 11, 2013. Retrieved November 22, 2013.  ^ "A Look Back at Professional Baseball's Longest Game". milb.com. September 4, 2008. Retrieved November 22, 2013.  ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m " Baltimore Orioles
Baltimore Orioles
Top 10 Batting Leaders". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports-Reference, Inc. Retrieved November 22, 2013. 

Further reading[edit]

Eisenberg, John (2017). The Streak: Lou Gehrig, Cal Ripken Jr., and Baseball's Most Historic Record. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. ISBN 978-0544107670.  Keenan, Jimmy. "Cal Ripken". SABR.  Ripken Jr., Cal (2007). The Longest Season. with Kevin Cowherd. Philomel Books. ISBN 0399244921.  Ripken Jr., Cal (2008). Get in the Game: 8 Elements of Perseverance That Make the Difference. with Donald T. Phillips. Avery Publishing. ISBN 1592402801.  Ripken Jr., Cal (2011). Cal Ripken, Jr.’s All-Stars: Hothead. Ron Mazellan, Illustrator. Hyperion Books for Children. ISBN 1423140001. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Cal Ripken Jr..

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Cal Ripken Jr.
Cal Ripken Jr.
at the Baseball
Baseball
Hall of Fame Career statistics and player information from MLB, or ESPN, or Baseball-Reference, or Fangraphs, or The Baseball Cube, or Baseball-Reference (Minors), or Retrosheet Ripken Baseball

Records

Preceded by Lou Gehrig Most Consecutive Major League Baseball
Baseball
Starts 1982–1998 Succeeded by Incumbent

Achievements

Preceded by Frank White Hitting for the cycle May 6, 1984 Succeeded by Carlton Fisk

Links to related articles

v t e

Baltimore Orioles
Baltimore Orioles
1983 World Series
World Series
champions

1 Al Bumbry 8 Cal Ripken Jr.
Cal Ripken Jr.
(AL MVP) 10 Todd Cruz 12 Lenn Sakata 15 Dan Ford 16 Scott McGregor 17 Joe Nolan 22 Jim Palmer 23 Tippy Martinez 24 Rick Dempsey
Rick Dempsey
( World Series
World Series
MVP) 25 Rich Dauer 27 Benny Ayala 28 Jim Dwyer 29 Ken Singleton 33 Eddie Murray 34 Storm Davis 35 Gary Roenicke 37 John Shelby 38 John Lowenstein 39 Tito Landrum 46 Mike Flanagan 49 Tim Stoddard 52 Mike Boddicker
Mike Boddicker
(ALCS MVP) 53 Sammy Stewart

Manager 26 Joe Altobelli

Coaches 31 Ray Miller 40 Jimmy Williams 44 Elrod Hendricks 47 Cal Ripken Sr. 54 Ralph Rowe

Regular season American League
American League
Championship Series

v t e

Major League Baseball
Baseball
All-Century Team

Pitchers

Nolan Ryan Sandy Koufax Cy Young Roger Clemens Bob Gibson Walter Johnson Warren Spahn Christy Mathewson Lefty Grove

Catchers

Johnny Bench Yogi Berra

Infielders

Lou Gehrig Mark McGwire Jackie Robinson Rogers Hornsby Mike Schmidt Brooks Robinson Cal Ripken Jr. Ernie Banks Honus Wagner

Outfielders

Babe Ruth Hank Aaron Ted Williams Willie Mays Joe DiMaggio Mickey Mantle Ty Cobb Ken Griffey Jr. Pete Rose Stan Musial

v t e

American League
American League
Rookie of the Year Award

1949: Sievers 1950: Dropo 1951: McDougald 1952: Byrd 1953: Kuenn 1954: Grim 1955: Score 1956: Aparicio 1957: Kubek 1958: Pearson 1959: Allison 1960: Hansen 1961: Schwall 1962: Tresh 1963: Peters 1964: Oliva 1965: Blefary 1966: Agee 1967: Carew 1968: Bahnsen 1969: Piniella 1970: Munson 1971: Chambliss 1972: Fisk 1973: Bumbry 1974: Hargrove 1975: Lynn 1976: Fidrych 1977: Murray 1978: Whitaker 1979: Castino & Griffin 1980: Charboneau 1981: Righetti 1982: Ripken Jr. 1983: Kittle 1984: Davis 1985: Guillén 1986: Canseco 1987: McGwire 1988: Weiss 1989: Olson 1990: Alomar Jr. 1991: Knoblauch 1992: Listach 1993: Salmon 1994: Hamelin 1995: Cordova 1996: Jeter 1997: Garciaparra 1998: Grieve 1999: Beltrán 2000: Sasaki 2001: Suzuki 2002: Hinske 2003: Berroa 2004: Crosby 2005: Street 2006: Verlander 2007: Pedroia 2008: Longoria 2009: Bailey 2010: Feliz 2011: Hellickson 2012: Trout 2013: Myers 2014: Abreu 2015: Correa 2016: Fulmer 2017: Judge

v t e

American League
American League
MVP Award

1931: Grove 1932: Foxx 1933: Foxx 1934: Cochrane 1935: Greenberg 1936: Gehrig 1937: Gehringer 1938: Foxx 1939: DiMaggio 1940: Greenberg 1941: DiMaggio 1942: Gordon 1943: Chandler 1944: Newhouser 1945: Newhouser 1946: Williams 1947: DiMaggio 1948: Boudreau 1949: Williams 1950: Rizzuto 1951: Berra 1952: Shantz 1953: Rosen 1954: Berra 1955: Berra 1956: Mantle 1957: Mantle 1958: Jensen 1959: Fox 1960: Maris 1961: Maris 1962: Mantle 1963: Howard 1964: B. Robinson 1965: Versalles 1966: F. Robinson 1967: Yastrzemski 1968: McLain 1969: Killebrew 1970: Powell 1971: Blue 1972: Allen 1973: Jackson 1974: Burroughs 1975: Lynn 1976: Munson 1977: Carew 1978: Rice 1979: Baylor 1980: Brett 1981: Fingers 1982: Yount 1983: Ripken Jr. 1984: Hernández 1985: Mattingly 1986: Clemens 1987: Bell 1988: Canseco 1989: Yount 1990: Henderson 1991: Ripken Jr. 1992: Eckersley 1993: Thomas 1994: Thomas 1995: Vaughn 1996: González 1997: Griffey Jr. 1998: González 1999: I. Rodríguez 2000: Giambi 2001: Suzuki 2002: Tejada 2003: A. Rodriguez 2004: Guerrero 2005: A. Rodriguez 2006: Morneau 2007: A. Rodriguez 2008: Pedroia 2009: Mauer 2010: Hamilton 2011: Verlander 2012: Cabrera 2013: Cabrera 2014: Trout 2015: Donaldson 2016: Trout 2017: Altuve

v t e

Major League Baseball All-Star Game
Major League Baseball All-Star Game
MVP Award

1962: Wills 1962: Wagner 1963: Mays 1964: Callison 1965: Marichal 1966: B. Robinson 1967: Pérez 1968: Mays 1969: McCovey 1970: Yastrzemski 1971: F. Robinson 1972: Morgan 1973: Bonds 1974: Garvey 1975: Madlock & Matlack 1976: Foster 1977: Sutton 1978: Garvey 1979: Parker 1980: Griffey Sr. 1981: Carter 1982: Concepción 1983: Lynn 1984: Carter 1985: Hoyt 1986: Clemens 1987: Raines 1988: Steinbach 1989: Jackson 1990: Franco 1991: Ripken Jr. 1992: Griffey Jr. 1993: Puckett 1994: McGriff 1995: Conine 1996: Piazza 1997: Alomar Jr. 1998: Alomar 1999: Martínez 2000: Jeter 2001: Ripken Jr. 2003: Anderson 2004: Soriano 2005: Tejada 2006: Young 2007: Suzuki 2008: Drew 2009: Crawford 2010: McCann 2011: Fielder 2012: Cabrera 2013: Rivera 2014: Trout 2015: Trout 2016: Hosmer 2017: Canó

v t e

Commissioner's Historic Achievement Award

Barry Bonds Roger Clemens Roberto Clemente Ken Griffey Jr. Tony Gwynn Rickey Henderson Derek Jeter Mark McGwire Cal Ripken Jr. Mariano Rivera Rachel Robinson Vin Scully Seattle Mariners Sammy Sosa Ichiro Suzuki

v t e

Roberto Clemente
Roberto Clemente
Award

1971: Mays 1972: Robinson 1973: Kaline 1974: Stargell 1975: Brock 1976: Rose 1977: Carew 1978: Luzinski 1979: Thornton 1980: Niekro 1981: Garvey 1982: Singleton 1983: Cooper 1984: Guidry 1985: Baylor 1986: Maddox 1987: Sutcliffe 1988: Murphy 1989: Carter 1990: Stewart 1991: Reynolds 1992: Ripken Jr. 1993: Larkin 1994: Winfield 1995: Smith 1996: Puckett 1997: Davis 1998: Sosa 1999: Gwynn 2000: Leiter 2001: Schilling 2002: Thome 2003: Moyer 2004: Martínez 2005: Smoltz 2006: Delgado 2007: Biggio 2008: Pujols 2009: Jeter 2010: Wakefield 2011: Ortiz 2012: Kershaw 2013: Beltrán 2014: Konerko & Rollins 2015: McCutchen 2016: Granderson 2017: Rizzo

v t e

Lou Gehrig
Lou Gehrig
Memorial Award

1955: Dark 1956: Reese 1957: Musial 1958: McDougald 1959: Hodges 1960: Groat 1961: Spahn 1962: Roberts 1963: Richardson 1964: Boyer 1965: Law 1966: Robinson 1967: Banks 1968: Kaline 1969: Rose 1970: Aaron 1971: Killebrew 1972: Parker 1973: Santo 1974: Stargell 1975: Bench 1976: Sutton 1977: Brock 1978: Kessinger 1979: Niekro 1980: Pérez 1981: John 1982: Cey 1983: Schmidt 1984: Garvey 1985: Murphy 1986: Brett 1987: Sutcliffe 1988: Bell 1989: Smith 1990: Davis 1991: Hrbek 1992: Ripken, Jr. 1993: Mattingly 1994: Larkin 1995: Schilling 1996: Butler 1997: Molitor 1998: Gwynn 1999: McGwire 2000: Stottlemyre 2001: Franco 2002: Graves 2003: Moyer 2004: Thome 2005: Smoltz 2006: Hoffman 2007: Timlin 2008: Victorino 2009: Pujols 2010: Jeter 2011: Zimmerman 2012: Zito 2013: Hamilton 2014: Beltre 2015: Granderson 2016: Harvey 2017: Altuve

v t e

Associated Press
Associated Press
Male Athlete of the Year

1931: Pepper Martin 1932: Gene Sarazen 1933: Carl Hubbell 1934: Dizzy Dean 1935: Joe Louis 1936: Jesse Owens 1937: Don Budge 1938: Don Budge 1939: Nile Kinnick 1940: Tom Harmon 1941: Joe DiMaggio 1942: Frank Sinkwich 1943: Gunder Hägg 1944: Byron Nelson 1945: Byron Nelson 1946: Glenn Davis 1947: Johnny Lujack 1948: Lou Boudreau 1949: Leon Hart 1950: Jim Konstanty 1951: Dick Kazmaier 1952: Bob Mathias 1953: Ben Hogan 1954: Willie Mays 1955: Howard Cassady 1956: Mickey Mantle 1957: Ted Williams 1958: Herb Elliott 1959: Ingemar Johansson 1960: Rafer Johnson 1961: Roger Maris 1962: Maury Wills 1963: Sandy Koufax 1964: Don Schollander 1965: Sandy Koufax 1966: Frank Robinson 1967: Carl Yastrzemski 1968: Denny McLain 1969: Tom Seaver 1970: George Blanda 1971: Lee Trevino 1972: Mark Spitz 1973: O. J. Simpson 1974: Muhammad Ali 1975: Fred Lynn 1976: Bruce Jenner 1977: Steve Cauthen 1978: Ron Guidry 1979: Willie Stargell 1980: U.S. Olympic Hockey Team 1981: John McEnroe 1982: Wayne Gretzky 1983: Carl Lewis 1984: Carl Lewis 1985: Dwight Gooden 1986: Larry Bird 1987: Ben Johnson 1988: Orel Hershiser 1989: Joe Montana 1990: Joe Montana 1991: Michael Jordan 1992: Michael Jordan 1993: Michael Jordan 1994: George Foreman 1995: Cal Ripken Jr. 1996: Michael Johnson 1997: Tiger Woods 1998: Mark McGwire 1999: Tiger Woods 2000: Tiger Woods 2001: Barry Bonds 2002: Lance Armstrong 2003: Lance Armstrong 2004: Lance Armstrong 2005: Lance Armstrong 2006: Tiger Woods 2007: Tom Brady 2008: Michael Phelps 2009: Jimmie Johnson 2010: Drew Brees 2011: Aaron Rodgers 2012: Michael Phelps 2013: LeBron James 2014: Madison Bumgarner 2015: Stephen Curry 2016: LeBron James 2017: José Altuve

v t e

Sporting News MLB Player of the Year Award

1936: Hubbell 1937: Allen 1938: Vander Meer 1939: DiMaggio 1940: Feller 1941: T. Williams 1942: T. Williams 1943: Chandler 1944: Marion 1945: Newhouser 1946: Musial 1947: T. Williams 1948: Boudreau 1949: T. Williams 1950: Rizzuto 1951: Musial 1952: Roberts 1953: Rosen 1954: Mays 1955: Snider 1956: Mantle 1957: T. Williams 1958: Turley 1959: Wynn 1960: Mazeroski 1961: Maris 1962: Wills & Drysdale 1963: Koufax 1964: Boyer 1965: Koufax 1966: Robinson 1967: Yastrzemski 1968: McLain 1969: McCovey 1970: Bench 1971: Torre 1972: B. Williams 1973: Jackson 1974: Brock 1975: Morgan 1976: Morgan 1977: Carew 1978: Guidry 1979: Stargell 1980: Brett 1981: Valenzuela 1982: Yount 1983: Ripken Jr. 1984: Sandberg 1985: Mattingly 1986: Clemens 1987: Bell 1988: Hershiser 1989: Mitchell 1990: Bonds 1991: Ripken Jr. 1992: Sheffield 1993: Thomas 1994: Bagwell 1995: Belle 1996: Rodriguez 1997: Griffey Jr. 1998: Sosa 1999: Palmeiro 2000: Delgado 2001: Bonds 2002: Rodriguez 2003: Pujols 2004: Bonds 2005: Jones 2006: Howard 2007: Rodriguez 2008: Pujols 2009: Pujols 2010: Hamilton 2011: Verlander 2012: Cabrera 2013: Cabrera 2014: Kershaw 2015: Donaldson 2016: Altuve 2017: Altuve

v t e

Best Male Athlete ESPY Award
Best Male Athlete ESPY Award
winners

1993: Jordan 1994: Bonds 1995: Young 1996: Ripken Jr. 1997: Johnson 1998: Woods / Griffey Jr. 1999: McGwire 2000: Woods 2001: Woods 2002: Woods 2003: Armstrong 2004: Armstrong 2005: Armstrong 2006: Armstrong 2007: Tomlinson 2008: Woods 2009: Phelps 2010: Brees 2011: Nowitzki 2012: James 2013: James 2014: Durant 2015: Curry 2016: James 2017: Westbrook

v t e

Sports Illustrated
Sports Illustrated
Sportsperson of the Year

1954: Roger Bannister 1955: Johnny Podres 1956: Bobby Morrow 1957: Stan Musial 1958: Rafer Johnson 1959: Ingemar Johansson 1960: Arnold Palmer 1961: Jerry Lucas 1962: Terry Baker 1963: Pete Rozelle 1964: Ken Venturi 1965: Sandy Koufax 1966: Jim Ryun 1967: Carl Yastrzemski 1968: Bill Russell 1969: Tom Seaver 1970: Bobby Orr 1971: Lee Trevino 1972: Billie Jean King
Billie Jean King
& John Wooden 1973: Jackie Stewart 1974: Muhammad Ali 1975: Pete Rose 1976: Chris Evert 1977: Steve Cauthen 1978: Jack Nicklaus 1979: Terry Bradshaw
Terry Bradshaw
& Willie Stargell 1980: U.S. Olympic Hockey Team 1981: Sugar Ray Leonard 1982: Wayne Gretzky 1983: Mary Decker 1984: Edwin Moses
Edwin Moses
& Mary Lou Retton 1985: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar 1986: Joe Paterno 1987: Bob Bourne, Judi Brown King, Kipchoge Keino, Dale Murphy, Chip Rives, Patty Sheehan, Rory Sparrow, & Reggie Williams 1988: Orel Hershiser 1989: Greg LeMond 1990: Joe Montana 1991: Michael Jordan 1992: Arthur Ashe 1993: Don Shula 1994: Bonnie Blair
Bonnie Blair
& Johann Olav Koss 1995: Cal Ripken Jr. 1996: Tiger Woods 1997: Dean Smith 1998: Mark McGwire
Mark McGwire
& Sammy Sosa 1999: U.S. Women's Soccer
Soccer
Team 2000: Tiger Woods 2001: Curt Schilling
Curt Schilling
& Randy Johnson 2002: Lance Armstrong 2003: David Robinson & Tim Duncan 2004: Boston Red Sox 2005: Tom Brady 2006: Dwyane Wade 2007: Brett Favre 2008: Michael Phelps 2009: Derek Jeter 2010: Drew Brees 2011: Mike Krzyzewski
Mike Krzyzewski
& Pat Summitt 2012: LeBron James 2013: Peyton Manning 2014: Madison Bumgarner 2015: Serena Williams 2016: LeBron James 2017: José Altuve
José Altuve
& J. J. Watt

v t e

Sporting News Sportsman/Pro Athlete of the Year

1968: Denny McLain 1969: Tom Seaver 1970: John Wooden 1971: Lee Trevino 1972: Charlie Finley 1973: O. J. Simpson 1974: Lou Brock 1975: Archie Griffin 1976: Larry O'Brien 1977: Steve Cauthen 1978: Ron Guidry 1979: Willie Stargell 1980: George Brett 1981: Wayne Gretzky 1982: Whitey Herzog 1983: Bowie Kuhn 1984: Peter Ueberroth 1985: Pete Rose 1986: Larry Bird 1987: None 1988: Jackie Joyner-Kersee 1989: Joe Montana 1990: Nolan Ryan 1991: Michael Jordan 1992: Mike Krzyzewski 1993: Cito Gaston
Cito Gaston
& Pat Gillick 1994: Emmitt Smith 1995: Cal Ripken Jr. 1996: Joe Torre 1997: Mark McGwire 1998: Mark McGwire
Mark McGwire
& Sammy Sosa 1999: New York Yankees 2000: Marshall Faulk
Marshall Faulk
& Kurt Warner 2001: Curt Schilling 2002: Tyrone Willingham 2003: Dick Vermeil
Dick Vermeil
& Jack McKeon 2004: Tom Brady 2005: Matt Leinart 2006: Dwyane Wade 2007: Tom Brady 2008: Eli Manning 2009: Mariano Rivera 2010: Roy Halladay 2011: Aaron Rodgers 2012: LeBron James

v t e

American League
American League
Shortstop
Shortstop
Silver Slugger Award

1980: Yount 1981: Burleson 1982: Yount 1983: Ripken, Jr. 1984: Ripken, Jr. 1985: Ripken, Jr. 1986: Ripken, Jr. 1987: Trammell 1988: Trammell 1989: Ripken, Jr. 1990: Trammell 1991: Ripken, Jr. 1992: Fryman 1993: Ripken, Jr. 1994: Ripken, Jr. 1995: Valentin 1996: Rodriguez 1997: Garciaparra 1998: Rodriguez 1999: Rodriguez 2000: Rodriguez 2001: Rodriguez 2002: Rodriguez 2003: Rodriguez 2004: Tejada 2005: Tejada 2006: Jeter 2007: Jeter 2008: Jeter 2009: Jeter 2010: Ramírez 2011: Cabrera 2012: Jeter 2013: Hardy 2014: Ramírez 2015: Bogaerts 2016: Bogaerts 2017: Lindor

v t e

American League
American League
Shortstop
Shortstop
Gold Glove Award

1958: Aparicio 1959: Aparicio 1960: Aparicio 1961: Aparicio 1962: Aparicio 1963: Versalles 1964: Aparicio 1965: Versalles 1966: Aparicio 1967: Fregosi 1968: Aparicio 1969: Belanger 1970: Aparicio 1971: Belanger 1972: Brinkman 1973: Belanger 1974: Belanger 1975: Belanger 1976: Belanger 1977: Belanger 1978: Belanger 1979: Burleson 1980: Trammell 1981: Trammell 1982: Yount 1983: Trammell 1984: Trammell 1985: Griffin 1986: Fernández 1987: Fernández 1988: Fernández 1989: Fernández 1990: Guillén 1991: Ripken, Jr. 1992: Ripken, Jr. 1993: Vizquel 1994: Vizquel 1995: Vizquel 1996: Vizquel 1997: Vizquel 1998: Vizquel 1999: Vizquel 2000: Vizquel 2001: Vizquel 2002: Rodriguez 2003: Rodriguez 2004: Jeter 2005: Jeter 2006: Jeter 2007: Cabrera 2008: Young 2009: Jeter 2010: Jeter 2011: Aybar 2012: Hardy 2013: Hardy 2014: Hardy 2015: Escobar 2016: Lindor 2017: Simmons

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Home Run Derby champions

1985: Parker 1986: Joyner, Strawberry 1987: Dawson 1988: (canceled due to rain) 1989: Davis 1990: Sandberg 1991: Ripken Jr. 1992: McGwire 1993: J. González 1994: Griffey Jr. 1995: Thomas 1996: Bonds 1997: Martinez 1998: Griffey Jr. 1999: Griffey Jr. 2000: Sosa 2001: L. Gonzalez 2002: Giambi 2003: Anderson 2004: Tejada 2005: Abreu 2006: Howard 2007: Guerrero 2008: Morneau 2009: Fielder 2010: Ortiz 2011: Canó 2012: Fielder 2013: Céspedes 2014: Céspedes 2015: Frazier 2016: Stanton 2017: Judge

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3,000 hit club

Pete Rose Ty Cobb Hank Aaron Stan Musial Tris Speaker Derek Jeter Honus Wagner Carl Yastrzemski Paul Molitor Eddie Collins Willie Mays Eddie Murray Nap Lajoie Cal Ripken Jr. George Brett Paul Waner Robin Yount Tony Gwynn Alex Rodriguez Dave Winfield Ichiro Suzuki Cap Anson Adrián Beltré Craig Biggio Rickey Henderson Rod Carew Lou Brock Rafael Palmeiro Wade Boggs Al Kaline Roberto Clemente

Italics denotes active player

Book:3,000 hit club

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Members of the Baltimore Orioles
Baltimore Orioles
Hall of Fame

Roberto Alomar Brady Anderson Luis Aparicio Harold Baines George Bamberger Steve Barber Hank Bauer Mark Belanger Paul Blair Mike Boddicker Mike Bordick Hal Brown Don Buford Al Bumbry Mike Cuellar Rich Dauer Doug DeCinces Rick Dempsey Jack Dunn III Mike Flanagan Jim Gentile Bobby Grich Dick Hall Elrod Hendricks Chris Hoiles Billy Hunter Davey Johnson John Lowenstein Dennis Martínez Tippy Martinez Lee May Scott McGregor Dave McNally Ray Miller Stu Miller Melvin Mora Eddie Murray Mike Mussina Johnny Oates Gregg Olson Jim Palmer Milt Pappas Boog Powell Paul Richards Cal Ripken Jr. Cal Ripken Sr. Brooks Robinson Frank Robinson Gary Roenicke Ken Singleton B. J. Surhoff Gus Triandos Eddie Watt Earl Weaver Hoyt Wilhelm Gene Woodling

Herb Armstrong Award

Richie Bancells Rex Barney Rob Brown Frank Cashen Harry Dalton Jerold Hoffberger Phil Itzoe Lenny Johnston Lee MacPhail Bill O'Donnell Hank Peters Don Pries Ralph Salvon Chuck Thompson Ernie Tyler Fred Uhlman Sr. Julie Wagner Eddie Weidner

"Wild Bill" Hagy Award

Wild Bill Hagy

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Baltimore Orioles
Baltimore Orioles
retired numbers

4 Earl Weaver 5 Brooks Robinson 8 Cal Ripken Jr. 20 Frank Robinson 22 Jim Palmer 33 Eddie Murray

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Baseball
Baseball
Hall of Fame Class of 2007

BBWAA Vote

Tony Gwynn
Tony Gwynn
(97.6%) Cal Ripken Jr.
Cal Ripken Jr.
(98.5%)

Veterans Committee

none

J. G. Taylor Spink Award

Rick Hummel

Ford C. Frick Award

Denny Matthews

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Members of the National Baseball
Baseball
Hall of Fame

Pitchers

Alexander Bender Blyleven M. Brown R. Brown Bunning Carlton Chesbro Clarkson Cooper Coveleski Cummings Day Dean Dihigo Drysdale Eckersley Faber Feller Fingers Ford B. Foster Galvin B. Gibson Glavine Gomez Gossage Grimes Grove Haines Hoffman Hoyt Hubbell Hunter Jenkins R. Johnson W. Johnson Joss Keefe Koufax Lemon Lyons Maddux Marichal Marquard Martínez Mathewson McGinnity Méndez Morris Newhouser Nichols Niekro Paige Palmer Pennock Perry Plank Radbourn Rixey Roberts Rogan Ruffing Rusie Ryan Seaver H. Smith Smoltz Spahn Sutter Sutton Vance Waddell Walsh Welch Wilhelm J. Williams Willis Wynn Young

Catchers

Bench Berra Bresnahan Campanella Carter Cochrane Dickey Ewing Ferrell Fisk J. Gibson Hartnett Lombardi Mackey Piazza Rodríguez Santop Schalk

First basemen

Anson Bagwell Beckley Bottomley Brouthers Cepeda Chance Connor Foxx Gehrig Greenberg G. Kelly Killebrew Leonard McCovey Mize Murray Pérez Sisler Suttles Taylor Terry Thomas Thome

Second basemen

Alomar Biggio Carew E. Collins Doerr Evers Fox Frisch Gehringer Gordon Grant Herman Hornsby Lajoie Lazzeri Mazeroski McPhee Morgan J. Robinson Sandberg Schoendienst

Third basemen

Baker Boggs Brett J. Collins Dandridge J. Johnson Jones Kell Lindstrom Mathews Molitor B. Robinson Santo Schmidt Traynor J. Wilson D. White

Shortstops

Aparicio Appling Bancroft Banks Boudreau Cronin Davis T. Jackson Jennings Larkin Lloyd Maranville Reese Ripken Jr. Rizzuto Sewell O. Smith Tinker Trammell Vaughan Wagner Wallace Ward Wells Yount

Outfielders

Aaron Ashburn Averill Bell Brock W. Brown Burkett Carey Charleston Clarke Clemente Cobb Combs Crawford Cuyler Dawson Delahanty DiMaggio Doby Duffy Flick Goslin Griffey Jr. Guerrero Gwynn Hafey Hamilton Heilmann Henderson Hill Hooper Irvin R. Jackson Kaline Keeler Kelley K. Kelly Kiner Klein Mantle Manush Mays T. McCarthy Medwick Musial O'Rourke Ott Puckett Raines J. Rice S. Rice F. Robinson Roush Ruth Simmons Slaughter Snider Speaker Stargell Stearnes Thompson Torriente L. Waner P. Waner Wheat B. Williams T. Williams H. Wilson Winfield Yastrzemski Youngs

Managers

Alston Anderson Cox Durocher Hanlon Harris Herzog Huggins La Russa Lasorda López Mack J. McCarthy McGraw McKechnie W. Robinson Selee Southworth Stengel Torre Weaver D. Williams

Executives / pioneers

Barrow Bulkeley Cartwright Chadwick Chandler Comiskey Dreyfuss R. Foster Frick Giles Gillick Griffith Harridge Hulbert B. Johnson Kuhn Landis La. MacPhail Le. MacPhail Manley O'Malley Pompez Posey Rickey Ruppert Schuerholz Selig Spalding Veeck Weiss S. White Wilkinson G. Wright H. Wright Yawkey

Umpires

Barlick Chylak Conlan Connolly Evans Harvey Hubbard Klem McGowan O'Day

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Major League Baseball
Baseball
on TBS

Related programs

Braves TBS Baseball
Baseball
(broadcasters) CBS Sports Spectacular

Related articles

Major League Baseball
Baseball
on cable television Television contracts

Music

"I Love This Town" (2007-2008) "We Weren't Born to Follow" (2009) "Born Free" (2010) "Written in the Stars" (2011) "Land of Hope and Dreams" (2012) "Do or Die" (2013) "Play Ball" (2014) "Heavy Is the Head" (2015) "The Line" (2017)

Commentators

ALCS ALDS NLCS NLDS

Key figures

Brian Anderson Chip Caray Matt Devlin Ernie Johnson Jr. Don Orsillo Steve Physioc Ted Robinson Victor Rojas Dick Stockton Matt Vasgersian

Color commentators

Bob Brenly Ron Darling Dennis Eckersley Tony Gwynn Buck Martinez Harold Reynolds Cal Ripken Jr. Joe Simpson Michele Mary Smith John Smoltz Steve Stone

Studio hosts

Marc Fein Keith Olbermann Casey Stern Matt Winer

Studio analysts

Dusty Baker Mark DeRosa Todd Frazier Curtis Granderson Dirk Hayhurst Pedro Martínez Jimmy Rollins Gary Sheffield Frank Thomas Shane Victorino David Wells

Field reporters

David Aldridge Sam Ryan Craig Sager Lauren Shehadi Tom Verducci

Lore televised by Turner

Regular season lore

Civil Rights Game

Postseason lore

"The Bug Game" (2007) Roy Halladay's postseason no-hitter (2010) "Infield Fly Game" (2012) "The Illegal Slide Game" (2015)

Tie-breaker games

2007 NL Wild Card 2008 AL Central 2009 AL Central 2013 AL Wild Card

AL Championship Series

2008 2010 2012 2014 2016 2018 2020

NL Championship Series

2007 2009 2011 2013 2015 2017 2019 2021

AL Division Series

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2016 2018 2020

NL Division Series

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2015 2017 2019 2021

AL Wild Card Game

2012 2013 2014 2016 2018 2020

NL Wild Card Game

2012 2013 2015 2017 2019 2021

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ZeniMax Media

Franchises

Dishonored Doom The Elder Scrolls Fallout IHRA Drag Racing Quake Wolfenstein

Current subsidiaries

Arkane Studios Bethesda Softworks

Bethesda Game Studios Bethesda Game Studios
Bethesda Game Studios
Austin

Escalation Studios id Software MachineGames Tango Gameworks ZeniMax Online Studios

Defunct subsidiaries

Vir2L Studios

Key people

Cal Ripken Jr. Christopher Weaver Ernest Del Harry E. Sloan Jerry Bruckheimer Leslie Moonves Robert A. Altman

Related

Creation Engine id Tech List of Bethesda Softworks
Bethesda Softworks
video games QuakeCon

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 115862658 LCCN: n84200877 GND: 173961630 NDL: 00738

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