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In the medieval history of Europe, Bulgaria's status as the Bulgarian Empire
Empire
(Bulgarian: Българско царство, Balgarsko tsarstvo [ˈbəlɡɐrskʊ ˈt͡sarstvʊ]), wherein it acted as a key regional power (particularly rivaling Byzantium in Southeastern Europe[1]) occurred in two distinct periods: between the seventh and eleventh centuries, and again between the twelfth and fourteenth centuries. The two "Bulgarian Empires" are not treated as separate entities, but rather as one state restored after a period of Byzantine rule over its territory.

Contents

1 First Bulgarian Empire 2 Second Bulgarian Empire 3 Maps 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading

First Bulgarian Empire[edit] Main article: First Bulgarian Empire

Kanasubigi Omurtag (814–831)

The First Bulgarian Empire
First Bulgarian Empire
was established on the territory both north and south of the lower course of the Danube River, and is usually described as having lasted between 681[2][3][4] and 1018, when it was subjugated by the Byzantine Empire
Byzantine Empire
despite Emperor Samuel's fierce resistance. It gradually reached its cultural and territorial apogee in the 9th century and early 10th century under Prince Boris I and Emperor Simeon the Great, when it developed into the cultural and literary center of Slavic Europe, as well as one of the largest states in Europe. Second Bulgarian Empire[edit] Main article: Second Bulgarian Empire The medieval Bulgarian state was restored as the Second Bulgarian Empire
Empire
after a successful uprising of two nobles from Tarnovo, Asen and Peter, in 1185, and existed until it was conquered during the Ottoman invasion of the Balkans
Balkans
in the late 14th century, with the date of its subjugation usually given as 1396, although some fringe views place it at 1422.[5] Under Ivan Asen II in the first half of the 13th century the country gradually recovered much of its former power, though this did not last long due to internal problems and foreign invasions. The Empire
Empire
became tributary to the Golden Horde, a successor state of the Mongol Empire
Mongol Empire
in the 13th to 14th centuries.[6][7] After the death of Emperor Ivan Alexander
Ivan Alexander
in 1371 Bulgaria
Bulgaria
was split into three countries and in the following decades fell under the domination of the Ottomans.

Tsar
Tsar
Ivan Alexander
Ivan Alexander
(1331–1371)

Coat of Arms of Bulgaria

Maps[edit]

Bulgaria
Bulgaria
after its foundation by kanasubigi Asparukh in 681

Map of Bulgaria
Bulgaria
during its largest territorial extension under Simeon the Great

Map of Bulgaria
Bulgaria
during the reign of Samuel

Bulgaria
Bulgaria
under the brothers Peter and Asen

The Bulgarian Empire
Empire
during the reign of Ivan Asen II

The Second Bulgarian Empire
Second Bulgarian Empire
after the death of Ivan Alexander

See also[edit]

Bulgarian Empire
Empire
portal

Kingdom of Bulgaria History of Bulgaria

References[edit]

^ R. Craig Nation. War in the Balkans, 1991–2002. Lulu.com. Retrieved 2012-06-28.  ^ A Concise History of Bulgaria, R. J. Crampton, Cambridge University Press, 2005, ISBN 0521616379, pp. 8-9. ^ The New Cambridge Medieval
Medieval
History: Volume 1, c.500–c.700, Paul Fouracre, Cambridge University Press, 2005, ISBN 0521362911, p. 301. ^ Мутафчиев, П. Гюзелев. В, История на българския народ 681–1323. Българска Академия на науките, 1986. стр. 106–108. ^ http://liternet.bg/publish13/p_pavlov/konstantin_II_asen.htm ^ Peter Jackson, The Mongols and the West, p. 204 ^ Denis Sinor, "The Mongols in the West", Journal of Asian History v. 33 n. 1 (1999).

Further reading[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Bulgarian Empire.

Zlatarski, Vasil N. (2006) [1918]. Medieval
Medieval
History of the Bulgarian State (in Bulgarian). Sofia: Science and Arts Publishers, 2nd Edition (Petar Petrov, Ed.), Zahari Stoyanov Publishers, 4th Edition, 2006. ISBN 978-954-739-928-0.  Бакалов, Георги; Милен Куманов (2003). Електронна издание – История на България (in Bulgarian). София: Труд, Сирма. ISBN 978-954-528-613-1.  Делев, Петър; Валери Кацунов; Пламен Митев; Евгения Калинова; Искра Баева; Боян Добрев (2006). История и цивилизация за 11. клас (in Bulgarian). Труд, Сирма.  Българите и България (in Bulgarian). Министерство на външните работи на България, Труд, Сирма. 2005. Archived from the original on 2005-11-10.  Fine, John V. A., Jr. (1991). The Early Medieval
Medieval
Balkans. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press. ISBN 978-0-472-08149-3. 

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Topics on the Bulgarian Empire

State Military Culture

Origin

Bulgars South Slavs Old Great Bulgaria

States

First Bulgarian Empire
First Bulgarian Empire
(681–1018) Second Bulgarian Empire
Second Bulgarian Empire
(1185–1396/1422)

De facto independent Bulgarian states from the Second Empire

Tsardom of Vidin
Vidin
(1371–1396/1422) Despotate of Dobruja
Despotate of Dobruja
(Principality of Karvuna) (1337/1346–1413)

Administration

Aristocracy • Great Boyar Council • Council of Preslav Capitals: Pliska
Pliska
(681–893) • Preslav
Preslav
(893–972) • Skopje (972–992) • Ohrid
Ohrid
(992–1018) • Tarnovo
Tarnovo
(1185–1393) • Nicopolis (1393–1396) • Vidin
Vidin
(1393–1396)

Important rulers First Bulgarian Empire Asparukh • Tervel • Krum
Krum
• Omurtag • Boris I • Simeon I • Peter I • Samuel Second Bulgarian Empire Ivan Asen I • Kaloyan • Ivan Asen II • Konstantin Tih
Konstantin Tih
• Michael Shishman • Ivan Alexander Economy

Bulgarian coinage Bulgarian economy

Bulgarian army Bulgarian navy

Conflicts

Byzantine–Bulgarian wars Croatian–Bulgarian wars Bulgarian–Hungarian wars Bulgarian–Latin wars Bulgarian–Ottoman wars Bulgarian–Serbian wars

Major battles First Bulgarian Empire Battle of Ongal
Battle of Ongal
• Siege of Constantinople • Battle of Marcellae • Battle of Pliska
Pliska
Battle of Southern Buh • Battle of Achelous • Battle of the Gates of Trajan
Battle of the Gates of Trajan
Battle of Kleidion
Battle of Kleidion
• Battle of Dyrrhachium Second Bulgarian Empire Battle of Tryavna
Battle of Tryavna
• Battle of Adrianople • Battle of Klokotnitsa • Battle of Skafida
Battle of Skafida
Battle of Velbazhd
Battle of Velbazhd
• Battle of Rusokastro • Battle of Chernomen • Siege of Tarnovo
Tarnovo
• Battle of Nicopolis Major uprisings

Uprising of Peter Delyan Uprising of Georgi Voiteh Uprising of Asen and Peter Uprising of Ivaylo Uprising of Konstantin and Fruzhin

Literature

Bulgarian literature Glagolitic script Early Cyrillic alphabet Cyrillic script Old Church Slavonic Preslav
Preslav
Literary School Ohrid
Ohrid
Literary School Royal charters

Prominent writers and scholars: Saint Naum
Saint Naum
• Clement of Ohrid
Ohrid
Chernorizets Hrabar
Chernorizets Hrabar
• Constantine of Preslav
Preslav
John the Exarch
John the Exarch
• Evtimiy of Tarnovo
Tarnovo
• Gregory Tsamblak Art and architecture

Architecture of the Tarnovo
Tarnovo
Artistic School Painting of the Tarnovo
Tarnovo
Artistic School

Famous examples: Madara Rider
Madara Rider
• Great Basilica • Round Church • Holy Forty Martyrs Church • Boyana Church
Boyana Church
• Tsarevets • Baba Vida
Baba Vida
• Cherven Religion

Tengrism Slavic Paganism Christianisation Eastern Orthodox Bulgarian Orthodox Archbishopric of Ohrid Roman Catholic Bogomilism

Portal

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Empires

Ancient

Akkadian Egyptian Assyrian Babylonian Carthaginian Chinese

Qin Han Jin Northern Wei Tang

Hellenistic

Macedonian Seleucid

Hittite Indian

Nanda Maurya Satavahana Shunga Gupta Harsha

Iranian

Elamite Median Achaemenid Parthian Sasanian

Kushan Mongol

Xianbei Xiongnu

Roman

Western Eastern

Teotihuacan

Post-classical

Arab

Rashidun Umayyad Abbasid Fatimid Córdoba

Aragonese Angevin Aztec Benin Bornu Bruneian Bulgarian

First Second

Byzantine

Nicaea Trebizond

Carolingian Chinese

Sui Tang Song Yuan

Ethiopian

Zagwe Solomonic

Georgian Hunnic Inca Indian

Chola Gurjara-Pratihara Pala Eastern Ganga dynasty Delhi Vijayanagara

Iranian

Samanid

Kanem Khmer Latin Majapahit Malaccan Mali Mongol

Yuan Golden Horde Chagatai Khanate Ilkhanate

Moroccan

Idrisid Almoravid Almohad Marinid

North Sea Oyo Roman Serbian Somali

Ajuran Ifatite Adalite Mogadishan Warsangali

Songhai Srivijaya Tibetan Turko-Persian

Ghaznavid Great Seljuk Khwarezmian Timurid

Vietnamese

Ly Tran Le

Wagadou

Modern

Ashanti Austrian Austro-Hungarian Brazilian Central African Chinese

Ming Qing China Manchukuo

Ethiopian French

First Second

German

First/Old Reich Second Reich Third Reich

Haitian

First Second

Indian

Maratha Sikh Mughal British Raj

Iranian

Safavid Afsharid

Japanese Johor Korean Mexican

First Second

Moroccan

Saadi Alaouite

Russian USSR Somali

Gobroon Majeerteen Hobyo Dervish

Swedish Tongan Turkish

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Vietnamese

Tay Son Nguyen Vietnam

Colonial

American Belgian British

English

Danish Dutch French German Italian Japanese Omani Norwegian Portuguese Spanish Swedish

Lists

Empires

largest

ancient great powers medieval great powers m

.