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Bristol
Bristol
is a city in Sullivan County, Tennessee, United States. The population was 26,702 at the 2010 census. It is the twin city of Bristol, Virginia, which lies directly across the state line between Tennessee
Tennessee
and Virginia. The boundary between the two cities is also the state line, which runs along State Street in their common downtown district. Bristol
Bristol
is a principal city of the Kingsport−Bristol−Bristol, TN-VA Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is a component of the Johnson City−Kingsport−Bristol, TN-VA Combined Statistical Area
Combined Statistical Area
− commonly known as the "Tri-Cities" region. Bristol
Bristol
is probably best known for being the site of some of the first commercial recordings of country music, showcasing Jimmie Rodgers and the Carter Family, and later a favorite venue of the mountain musician Uncle Charlie Osborne. The U.S. Congress
U.S. Congress
recognized Bristol
Bristol
as the "Birthplace of Country Music" in 1998, and the Birthplace of Country Music Museum is located in Bristol.[6] Bristol
Bristol
is the birthplace of Tennessee
Tennessee
Ernie Ford. Bristol
Bristol
is also the site of Bristol
Bristol
Motor Speedway, a NASCAR
NASCAR
short track that is one of the most well-known motorsports facilities in the country.

Contents

1 History

1.1 "Birthplace of Country Music"

2 Geography

2.1 Climate

3 Demographics 4 Government

4.1 Professional sports 4.2 Media

5 Education

5.1 Universities 5.2 Colleges 5.3 High schools 5.4 Middle school 5.5 Elementary schools

6 Police department 7 Notable people 8 References 9 External links

History[edit]

This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it. (October 2016)

"Birthplace of Country Music"[edit] Further information: Bristol
Bristol
sessions and Music of East Tennessee

The Grand Guitar on West State Street.

The U.S. Congress
U.S. Congress
declared Bristol
Bristol
to be the "Birthplace of Country Music", according to a resolution passed in 1998, recognizing its contributions to early country music recordings and influence, and the Birthplace of Country Music Museum
Birthplace of Country Music Museum
is located in Bristol.[6] In 1927 record producer Ralph Peer of Victor Records began recording local musicians in Bristol, to attempt to capture the local sound of traditional "folk" music of the region. One of these local sounds was created by the Carter Family, which got its start on July 31, 1927, when A.P. Carter and his family journeyed from Maces Spring, Virginia, to Bristol
Bristol
to audition for Ralph Peer, who was seeking new talent for the relatively embryonic recording industry. They received $50 for each song they recorded. That same visit by Peer to Bristol
Bristol
also resulted in the first recordings by Jimmie Rodgers.[7] Since 1994, the Birthplace of Country Music Alliance[8] has promoted the city as a destination to learn about country music and the city's role in the creation of an entire music genre. Currently, the Alliance is organizing the building of a new Cultural Heritage Center to help educate the public about the history of country music in the region.[8] Every year, during the third weekend in September, a music festival called the Bristol
Bristol
Rhythm & Roots Reunion takes place. The festival is held downtown, where Tennessee
Tennessee
and Virginia
Virginia
meet, and it celebrates Bristol's heritage as the Birthplace of Country Music.[9] Geography[edit] Bristol
Bristol
is located in the northeast corner of Tennessee, at 36°34′9″N 82°11′51″W / 36.56917°N 82.19750°W / 36.56917; -82.19750 (36.569135, -82.197489).[10] According to the United States Census
Census
Bureau, the city has a total area of 29.5 square miles (76.4 km2), of which 29.4 square miles (76.1 km2) is land and 0.1 square miles (0.3 km2) (0.44%) is water. Climate[edit] Like much of the rest of the state, Bristol
Bristol
has a humid subtropical climate (Köppen climate classification: Cfa), although with significantly cooler temperatures, especially in the summer, due to elevation; it is part of USDA hardiness zone 6b, with areas to the southwest falling in zone 7a.[11] The normal monthly mean temperature ranges from 35.2 °F (1.8 °C) in January to 74.6 °F (23.7 °C) in July, while, on average, there are 8.8 days where the temperature stays at or below freezing and 17 days with a high at or above 90 °F (32 °C) per year.[12] The all-time record low is −21 °F (−29 °C), set on January 21, 1985, while the all-time record high is 103 °F (39 °C), set on June 30, 2012.[12]

Precipitation
Precipitation
is low compared to much of East Tennessee, averaging 41.0 inches (1,040 mm) annually, and reaches a low during autumn. The rainiest calendar day on record is October 16, 1964 when 3.65 inches (93 mm) of rain fell; monthly precipitation has ranged from 0.02 inches (0.51 mm) in October 2002 to 12.70 inches (323 mm) in July 2012.[12] Bristol's normal (1981–2010) winter snowfall stands at 13.3 inches (34 cm), significantly more than what most of Tennessee
Tennessee
receives. The most snow in one calendar day was 16.2 inches (41 cm) on November 21, 1952, while the most in one month is 27.9 inches (71 cm) during March 1960, which contributed to the winter of 1959–60, with a total of 51.0 inches (130 cm), finishing as the snowiest on record.[12]

Climate data for Bristol, Tennessee
Tennessee
(Tri-Cities Regional Airport), 1981–2010 normals, extremes 1937–present

Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year

Record high °F (°C) 79 (26) 82 (28) 85 (29) 90 (32) 94 (34) 103 (39) 102 (39) 101 (38) 100 (38) 91 (33) 82 (28) 78 (26) 103 (39)

Mean maximum °F (°C) 66.0 (18.9) 69.3 (20.7) 77.0 (25) 83.9 (28.8) 86.1 (30.1) 90.7 (32.6) 92.3 (33.5) 92.2 (33.4) 88.8 (31.6) 82.2 (27.9) 75.5 (24.2) 66.7 (19.3) 93.6 (34.2)

Average high °F (°C) 45.3 (7.4) 49.9 (9.9) 59.0 (15) 68.0 (20) 75.9 (24.4) 83.0 (28.3) 85.5 (29.7) 85.1 (29.5) 79.2 (26.2) 69.2 (20.7) 58.7 (14.8) 48.0 (8.9) 67.3 (19.6)

Average low °F (°C) 25.0 (−3.9) 28.1 (−2.2) 34.4 (1.3) 42.4 (5.8) 51.1 (10.6) 60.0 (15.6) 63.8 (17.7) 62.5 (16.9) 55.1 (12.8) 43.4 (6.3) 34.6 (1.4) 27.6 (−2.4) 44.1 (6.7)

Mean minimum °F (°C) 5.6 (−14.7) 11.1 (−11.6) 18.4 (−7.6) 27.2 (−2.7) 36.8 (2.7) 48.6 (9.2) 55.5 (13.1) 53.8 (12.1) 41.6 (5.3) 28.9 (−1.7) 20.1 (−6.6) 10.5 (−11.9) 2.0 (−16.7)

Record low °F (°C) −21 (−29) −15 (−26) −2 (−19) 21 (−6) 30 (−1) 38 (3) 45 (7) 43 (6) 33 (1) 20 (−7) 5 (−15) −9 (−23) −21 (−29)

Average precipitation inches (mm) 3.37 (85.6) 3.45 (87.6) 3.44 (87.4) 3.33 (84.6) 3.80 (96.5) 3.90 (99.1) 4.69 (119.1) 3.47 (88.1) 2.99 (75.9) 2.10 (53.3) 3.10 (78.7) 3.37 (85.6) 41.01 (1,041.7)

Average snowfall inches (cm) 4.7 (11.9) 3.4 (8.6) 1.4 (3.6) 1.1 (2.8) 0 (0) 0 (0) 0 (0) 0 (0) 0 (0) 0.1 (0.3) 0.2 (0.5) 2.4 (6.1) 13.3 (33.8)

Average precipitation days (≥ 0.01 in) 12.3 11.9 12.6 11.9 12.2 12.2 12.3 10.1 8.4 8.6 10.0 11.9 134.4

Average snowy days (≥ 0.1 in) 4.3 3.5 1.3 0.5 0 0 0 0 0 0.1 0.3 2.5 12.5

Source: NOAA[12][13]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population

Census Pop.

1880 1,647

1890 3,324

101.8%

1900 5,271

58.6%

1910 7,148

35.6%

1920 8,047

12.6%

1930 12,005

49.2%

1940 14,004

16.7%

1950 16,771

19.8%

1960 17,582

4.8%

1970 20,064

14.1%

1980 23,986

19.5%

1990 23,421

−2.4%

2000 24,821

6.0%

2010 26,702

7.6%

Est. 2016 27,109 [4] 1.5%

U.S. Decennial Census[14] 2012 Estimate[15]

As of the census[16] of 2000, there were 24,821 people, 10,648 households, and 6,825 families residing in the city. The population density in 2000 was 846 people per square mile (326.5/km²). There were 11,511 housing units at an average density of 392.2 per square mile (151.4/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 95.15% White, 2.97% African American, 0.31% Native American, 0.64% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.23% from other races, and 0.70% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.68% of the population. There were 10,648 households out of which 26.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.0% were married couples living together, 11.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.9% were non-families. Nearly 32% of all households were made up of individuals, and 14.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.26, and the average family size was 2.84. In the city, the population was spread out, with 21.1% under the age of 18, 9.1% from 18 to 24, 27.2% from 25 to 44, 24.7% from 45 to 64, and 17.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 90.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.3 males. The median income for a household in the city was $30,039, and the median income for a family was $37,341. Males had a median income of $28,210 versus $21,173 for females. The per capita income for the city was $18,535. About 11.5% of families and 15.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.4% of those under age 18 and 12.0% of those age 65 or over. Government[edit] As of July 2016, the following individuals were major figures in Bristol's government:

Mayor, Jack Young[17] Vice Mayor, Margaret Feierabend Councilman, Chad Keen Councilwoman, Lea Powers Councilwoman, Michelle Reuining

Professional sports[edit]

Bristol
Bristol
Motor Speedway

Bristol
Bristol
is the location of Bristol
Bristol
Motor Speedway, a NASCAR
NASCAR
Sprint Cup track. Bristol
Bristol
is also home to Bristol
Bristol
Dragway, which hosts the Ford Thunder Valley Nationals, an NHRA national event. A Pittsburgh Pirates
Pittsburgh Pirates
R-league minor league affiliate, the Bristol Pirates, plays its home games at DeVault Memorial Stadium in Bristol, Virginia. Media[edit] Television:

WCYB-TV
WCYB-TV
(NBC Channel 5.1) WCYB-DT2
WCYB-DT2
(CW Channel 5.2) WEMT-TV
WEMT-TV
(FOX Channel 39.1)

Note-WEMT is Licensed to Greeneville, Tennessee, but co-located with sister station WCYB-TV. Radio:

WZAP
WZAP
(AM 690 kHz) Christian WFHG (FM 92.9 MHz) Super Talk
Talk
WFHG WWTB (AM 980 kHz) The Sports Fox WXBQ
WXBQ
(FM 96.9 MHz) Twenty-four Carrot Country WAEZ (FM 94.9 MHz) Electric 94.9 WEXX (FM 99.3 MHz) The X 99.3 WTFM
WTFM
(FM 98.5 MHz) WTFM
WTFM
98.5 WBCM-LP
WBCM-LP
(FM 100.1 MHz) WBCM Radio Bristol

Newspaper:

Bristol
Bristol
Herald Courier

Library:

Bristol
Bristol
Public Library

Education[edit] Universities[edit]

King University

Colleges[edit]

Graham Bible College

High schools[edit]

Bristol
Bristol
Tennessee
Tennessee
High School

Middle school[edit]

Vance Middle School

Elementary schools[edit]

Anderson Elementary School Avoca Elementary School Fairmount Elementary School Haynesfield Elementary School Holston View Elementary School

Police department[edit] The Bristol, Tennessee
Tennessee
Police Department is the municipal law enforcement agency for the city. The BPD has 69 sworn officers and 25 civilian supportive staff. It also makes use of citizen volunteers as an auxiliary staff that saves the department over $100,000 annually.[18] Notable people[edit]

Clarence Ashley, old-time musician George Lafayette Carter, entrepreneur John I. Cox, Governor of Tennessee
Tennessee
(1905−1907) Chris Crocker, internet celebrity/blogger Tennessee
Tennessee
Ernie Ford, singer, actor, entertainer Justin Grimm, professional baseball player for the Chicago Cubs Doyle Lawson, Grammy-nominated Bluegrass musician and frontman of Doyle Lawson
Doyle Lawson
and Quicksilver Dave Loggins, songwriter, recording artist David Massengill, Folk singer/songwriter Jayma Mays, Actress Ricky Morton, Professional Wrestler/WWE Hall of Famer. One half of tag team Rock N Roll Express Chase Owens, Professional Wrestler/ Member of wrestling stable The Bullet Club.

References[edit] Notes

^ Tennessee
Tennessee
Blue Book (PDF). 2005–2006. pp. 618–625. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2 March 2006.  ^ Bristol
Bristol
Chamber of Commerce, "About Bristol
Bristol
Archived December 21, 2012, at the Wayback Machine.." Retrieved: 17 January 2013. ^ U.S. Census
Census
Quickfacts. Retrieved: 2 July 2016. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.  ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.  ^ a b "Birthplace of Country Music", AmericasLibrary.gov, 2011, web: AL. ^ David Sanjek, "All the Memories Money Can Buy: Marketing Authenticity and Manufacturing Authorship", p. 155–172 in Eric Weisbard, ed., This is Pop, Harvard University Press, 2004. ISBN 0-674-01321-2 (cloth), ISBN 0-674-01344-1 (paper). p. 158. ^ a b "BCMA - Birthplace of Country Music Alliance", BCMA, 2012, webpage: BCMA. ^ " Bristol
Bristol
Rhythm & Roots Reunion", BristolRhythm.com, 2011, webpage: BR ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.  ^ United States Department of Agriculture. United States National Arboretum. USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map [Retrieved 2015-03-02]. ^ a b c d e "NowData - NOAA Online Weather Data". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 2018-02-27.  ^ "Station Name: TN BRISTOL TRI CITY AP". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 2018-02-27.  ^ United States Census
Census
Bureau. " Census
Census
of Population and Housing". Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved August 30, 2013.  ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". Archived from the original on November 20, 2013. Retrieved August 30, 2013.  ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census
Census
Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.  ^ Bristol, TN City
City
Council Members Archived December 6, 2012, at the Wayback Machine. ^ Bristol
Bristol
Police Department website Archived April 17, 2008, at the Wayback Machine.

Further reading

Phillips, V.N. Bud. (1992) Bristol
Bristol
Tennessee/Virginia: A History-1852-1900. Johnson City: Overmountain Press. ISBN 0-932807-63-1

External links[edit]

Wikisource
Wikisource
has the text of the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica article Bristol
Bristol
(Tennessee).

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Bristol, Tennessee.

City
City
of Bristol
Bristol
Official Home Page Bristol, TN at Curlie (based on DMOZ) Municipal Technical Advisory Service entry for Bristol
Bristol
– information on local officials, elections, and link to charter

v t e

Municipalities and communities of Sullivan County, Tennessee, United States

County seat: Blountville

Cities

Bluff City Bristol Johnson City‡ Kingsport‡

CDPs

Bloomingdale Blountville Colonial Heights Spurgeon‡ Walnut Hill

Unincorporated communities

Arcadia Boring Buffalo Cedar Grove (east) Cedar Grove (west) Fordtown Holston Valley Lynn Garden Morrison City Piney Flats Sullivan Gardens

Footnotes

‡This populated place also has portions in an adjacent county or counties

v t e

 State of Tennessee

Nashville (capital)

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Regions

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Tennessee
Valley Tri-Cities

Largest cities

Bartlett Bristol Chattanooga Clarksville Cleveland Franklin Hendersonville Jackson Johnson City Kingsport Knoxville Memphis Murfreesboro Nashville

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Anderson Bedford Benton Bledsoe Blount Bradley Campbell Cannon Carroll Carter Cheatham Chester Claiborne Clay Cocke Coffee Crockett Cumberland Davidson Decatur DeKalb Dickson Dyer Fayette Fentress Franklin Gibson Giles Grainger Greene Grundy Hamblen Hamilton Hancock Hardeman Hardin Hawkins Haywood Henderson Henry Hickman Houston Humphreys Jackson Jefferson Johnson Knox Lake Lauderdale Lawrence Lewis Lincoln Loudon Macon Madison Marion Marshall Maury McMinn McNairy Meigs Monroe Montgomery Moore Morgan Obion Overton Perry Pickett Polk Putnam Rhea Roane Robertson Rutherford Scott Sequatchie Sevier Shelby Smith Stewart Sullivan Sumner Tipton Trousdale Unicoi Union Van Buren Warren Washington Wayne Weakley White Willi

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