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Brent Woody Musburger (/ˈmʌsbɜːrɡər/; born May 26, 1939) is an American sportscaster, lead broadcaster and managing editor at Vegas Stats and Information Network (VSiN). He retired in January 2017 from the ESPN
ESPN
and ABC television networks. Formerly with CBS Sports
CBS Sports
and one of the original members of their program The NFL Today, Musburger has also covered the NBA, MLB, NCAA
NCAA
football and basketball, and NASCAR and served as a studio host for games, a play-by-play man, and halftime host. He has also performed postgame wrap-up segments and covered championship trophy presentations. He is a member of the Montana Broadcaster's Association Hall of Fame.[2]

Contents

1 Early life and career 2 CBS Sports
CBS Sports
(1973–1990)

2.1 The NFL Today 2.2 CBS
CBS
departure

3 ABC Sports and ESPN
ESPN
(1990–2017)

3.1 College football 3.2 ESPN/ABC departure and retirement from play-by-play

4 Vegas Stats & Information Network 5 Style 6 Other media 7 Career timeline 8 References 9 External links

Early life and career[edit] Musburger was born in Portland, Oregon, and raised in Billings, Montana, the son of Beryl Ruth (Woody) and Cec Musburger.[3][4] He was an umpire for minor league baseball during the 1950s. He was also a boyhood friend of former Major League pitcher Dave McNally. His brother, Todd Musburger, is a prominent sports agent. Musburger's youth included some brushes with trouble: when he was 12, he and his brother stole a car belonging to their mother's cleaning lady and took it for a joy ride. His parents sent him to the Shattuck-St. Mary's
Shattuck-St. Mary's
School in Faribault, Minnesota.[4] Educated at Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism, he was kicked out for a year for owning and operating a car without a license.[4] Musburger began his career as a sportswriter for the now-defunct Chicago's American
Chicago's American
newspaper, where he worked with legendary sportswriter Warren Brown. In 1968, Musburger penned a column regarding Tommie Smith
Tommie Smith
and John Carlos's protest of racial injustice in the United States
United States
with a Black Power salute on the medal stand during the 1968 Summer Olympics. In it he stated "Smith and Carlos looked like a couple of black-skinned storm troopers" who were "ignoble," "juvenile," and "unimaginative." In a 1999 article in The New York Times, Musburger stated that comparing the two to the Nazis was "harsh", but he stood by his criticism of the pair's action:

Did [Smith and Carlos' action] improve anything?... Smith and Carlos aside, I object to using the Olympic awards stand to make a political statement.[5]

According to Carlos, Musburger never apologized:

We are talking about someone who compared us to Nazis. Think about that. Here we are standing up to apartheid and to a man in Avery Brundage who delivered the Olympics to Hitler’s Germany. And here’s Musburger calling us Nazis. That got around. It followed us. It hurt us. It hurt my wife, my kids. I’ve never been able to confront him about why he did this. Every time I’ve been at a function or an event with Brent Musburger
Brent Musburger
and I walk towards him, he heads the other way.[6]

In 1968, Musburger began a 22-year association with CBS, first as a sports anchor for WBBM radio and later for WBBM-TV. In the mid-1970s, Musburger moved to Los Angeles
Los Angeles
and anchored news and sports for KNXT (now KCBS-TV); there he worked alongside Connie Chung
Connie Chung
as a co-anchor on KNXT's evening newscasts from 1978 until 1980, when he joined CBS Sports full-time. CBS Sports
CBS Sports
(1973–1990)[edit] Beginning in late 1973, Musburger was doing play-by-play for CBS Sports. He started out doing regular season National Football League games (future The NFL Today
The NFL Today
co-host Irv Cross was also doing NFL games at that time as well). Musburger was paired with Tommy Mason or Bart Starr, who provided the color commentary. A year later, Wayne Walker would be paired with Musburger in the booth. By 1975 at CBS, Musburger went from doing NFL play-by-play (and other items, mostly on CBS' Sports Saturday/Sunday programs) to rising to prominence as the host of the network's National Football League studio show, The NFL Today. Suddenly, Musburger began to cover many assignments for CBS
CBS
Sports. Among the other events he covered, either as studio host or play-by-play announcer, were college football and basketball, the National Basketball Association, horse racing, the U.S. Open (tennis)
U.S. Open (tennis)
tournament, and The Masters[7] golf tournament. He would even lend his talents to weekend afternoon fare such as The World's Strongest Man contests and the like. Musburger also called Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
games for CBS
CBS
Radio. The NFL Today[edit] But it was Musburger's association with The NFL Today
The NFL Today
that made him famous. During his tenure, CBS' NFL pregame show was consistently the #1 rated pregame show. One of the signatures of the program was Musburger's show-opening teases to the various games CBS
CBS
would cover, along with live images from the various stadiums. Musburger's accompanying intro to each visual, "You are looking live at..." became one of his catch phrases. In promoting the network, his voice often tailed off on the last letter of "CBS" ("C.B. eeezz"), creating another catch phrase. Musburger made headlines when he got into a fist-fight with The NFL Today's betting analyst Jimmy "The Greek" Snyder in a Manhattan bar on October 27, 1980. However, the fist-fight incident was quickly regarded as water under the bridge as the two cheerfully appeared on The NFL Today
The NFL Today
the following week wearing boxing gloves on camera.[citation needed] CBS
CBS
departure[edit] By the late 1980s, Musburger was CBS's top sportscaster. He was the main host and play-by-play announcer for the NBA Finals, college basketball, college football, the Belmont Stakes, and the College World Series. He also hosted a New Year's Eve countdown for CBS. Musburger is regarded as the first broadcaster to apply the term March Madness to the annual NCAA
NCAA
Men's Division I Basketball Championship tournament.[8] Early in 1990, CBS
CBS
underwent a significant management change. During the early morning hours of April 1, 1990, Musburger was fired from CBS. His final assignment for CBS
CBS
came the following evening, doing play-by-play for the 1990 NCAA
NCAA
men's basketball final, which was Duke versus UNLV. When the game was completed, Musburger thanked the audience and CBS
CBS
Sports, and the analysts that he had worked with through the years like Billy Packer, who was standing next to him.[9] At the time of his firing, Musburger had been set to handle play-by-play duties for CBS's television coverage of Major League Baseball later that month; he was replaced by Jack Buck[10] in that capacity. His position at The NFL Today
The NFL Today
was filled by Greg Gumbel. His position as the lead play-by-play announcer for college basketball was filled by Jim Nantz. ABC Sports and ESPN
ESPN
(1990–2017)[edit] Following his dismissal from CBS, Musburger considered several offers – including one to return to Chicago and work at WGN-TV. Musburger settled at ABC. With Al Michaels
Al Michaels
entrenched as ABC's top broadcaster, Musburger focused on college football and basketball. After his hiring, ABC's merger with ESPN
ESPN
under the Disney umbrella allowed him[11] to work on ESPN
ESPN
as well (increasingly since 2006), including Major League Baseball,[12][13][14][15] NBA games, ESPN
ESPN
Radio, golf tournaments, horse racing, the Indianapolis 500, Little League World Series, soccer games, college football, and even some NFL games (including hosting halftime duties for Monday Night Football
Monday Night Football
and Wild Card round games). Musburger was also the main studio host during ABC's coverage of the 1998 World Cup and the 2006 World Cup, was briefly the studio host for ESPN
ESPN
and ABC's NASCAR
NASCAR
coverage and has hosted Tour de France
Tour de France
coverage for ABC. College football[edit]

Brent Musburger
Brent Musburger
departs the College GameDay bus in Austin, Texas
Austin, Texas
in 2006

Musburger's college football duties for ESPN
ESPN
and ABC have included calling seven BCS National Championship games (2000, 2004, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014). Beginning in 2006, Musburger called ABC Sports' college football prime time series, along with analysts Bob Davie and Kirk Herbstreit. Musburger called the 2007 Rose Bowl, taking over for the retired Keith Jackson. He also called games on ESPN
ESPN
during his time at ABC. On September 17, 2005, after broadcasting the Nebraska Cornhuskers vs. Pittsburgh Panthers game, Musburger was cited for having an open container in a motor vehicle.[16] During the 2013 BCS National Championship Game
2013 BCS National Championship Game
between Alabama and Notre Dame, a camera turned to Katherine Webb, who was in the stands cheering for her boyfriend, Alabama quarterback, AJ McCarron. Musburger, impressed with Webb's beauty, remarked, "I'm telling you, you quarterbacks get all the good-looking women. What a beautiful woman. Wow!" and continued commenting in a similar fashion.[17] The next day, ESPN
ESPN
apologized for his comments, saying they "went too far".[18] The controversy died down quickly afterwards, largely due to Webb stating that she was not bothered at all by Musburger's comments. On March 12, 2014, ESPN
ESPN
named Musburger and Jesse Palmer
Jesse Palmer
as the lead game commentators for college football coverage on the SEC Network, ending his involvement with Saturday Night Football.[19] Also, this meant Musburger would not be participating in calling the College Football Playoff championship. Ever since, Musburger infrequently called select football games on ESPN
ESPN
and ABC, including the 2014 Iron Bowl[20] and 2016 Magnolia Bowl,[21] the 2014, 2015, and 2016 Las Vegas
Las Vegas
Bowls, the 2016 contest between Clemson and Auburn[22] and the 2014 Orange Bowl, 2016 Rose Bowl, and 2017 Sugar Bowl.[23] During the 2017 Sugar Bowl, Musburger drew criticism for complimentary statements about Oklahoma running back Joe Mixon, a player who had been involved in an assault with a woman; the criticism included numerous members of the sports media.[24] During the second half of the same broadcast, he angrily defended his position and derided people on social media who criticized him.[25][26] ESPN/ABC departure and retirement from play-by-play[edit] On January 25, 2017, Musburger announced that he would retire from play-by-play broadcasting[27][28][29] and would call his final game at Rupp Arena
Rupp Arena
in Lexington, Kentucky
Lexington, Kentucky
on January 31, 2017. [30] Musburger stated he plans to help his family get a sports handicapping business started in Las Vegas, have a sports gambling show on Sirius XM Radio, and enjoy personal travel.[30][31] The new venture, Vegas Sports Information Network (VSiN) is the first multichannel network dedicated to sports gambling information and is broadcast from a custom-built studio at the South Point Hotel, Casino & Spa.[32][33] The network officially launched February 27, 2017. Musburger hosted a special early premiere episode of his new show on February 5 before Super Bowl LI.[34] Vegas Stats & Information Network[edit] Musburger now resides in Las Vegas, Nevada
Las Vegas, Nevada
where he is the face of the Vegas Stats & Information Network. VSiN (pronounced VEE-sin) broadcasts from inside the South Point Hotel & Casino sports book. Musburger's show My Guys in the Desert broadcasts on Mondays, Thursdays & Fridays from 6 p.m. ET - 8 p.m. ET & weekends from 3 p.m. ET - 5 p.m. ET on SiriusXM
SiriusXM
and the network's website VSiN.com, with Ron Flatter serving as his co-host. Style[edit] Musburger has a down-to-earth manner of speaking, often addressing his viewers as "folks." In a Sports Illustrated
Sports Illustrated
profile done on Musburger in January 1984, he stressed his hesitance to "pontificate" during his broadcasts. CNN Sports Illustrated's Stewart Mandel selected him as the second-best college football announcer, behind Ron Franklin. Mandel said of Musburger, "His voice will always be associated with some of the sport's most memorable, modern moments."[35] Musburger has a reputation for pointing out attractive women in the crowds of the games he calls; among those who later rose to fame in part because of Musburger's attention are Susan “Busty Heart” Sykes,[36] Jenn Sterger,[37] and Katherine Webb
Katherine Webb
McCarron.[38] Other media[edit] Musburger was a reporter in Rocky II
Rocky II
and had his role immortalized in a 1979 action figure. [39]He also plays the fictional monster "Scuzzlebutt"s right leg on an episode of South Park.[40] He also made cameo appearances in The Main Event and The Waterboy. In Cars 2
Cars 2
and Planes, he played Brent Mustangburger, a fictionalized version of himself. He appeared as himself in the episode "Lying Around" on the ABC sitcom Happy Endings.[41] Career timeline[edit]

1973–1975: NFL on CBS
CBS
play-by-play 1975–1980; 1983–1989: NBA on CBS
CBS
play-by-play (lead play-by-play 1975–1980) 1975–1989: The NFL Today
The NFL Today
studio host[42] 1976–1989: US Open (tennis) play-by-play 1981–1984: College Basketball on CBS
CBS
studio host 1983–1988: The Masters Studio Host[43] 1984–1989: NCAA
NCAA
Football on CBS
CBS
play-by-play (lead play-by-play, 1984–1988) 1984: World Series commentator for CBS
CBS
Radio Network 1985–1990: College Basketball on CBS
CBS
lead play-by-play 1990–1996: Monday Night Football
Monday Night Football
studio host[43] 1990–2009: College Basketball on ABC play-by-play 1990–2014: College Football on ABC
College Football on ABC
play-by-play[43] 1990–2017: College Basketball on ESPN
ESPN
play-by-play 1991–1992, 1997–1998, 2000–2011: Little League World Series Play-by-Play[44] 1993, 1997, 2003, 2007–2014, 2016: Rose Bowl play-by-play 1994–1995: Baseball Night in America #2 play-by-play for ABC 1996–2004: NBA Finals
NBA Finals
play-by-play for ESPN
ESPN
Radio 1998, 2006: World Cup studio host 2000, 2004, 2010–2014: BCS National Championship Game
BCS National Championship Game
play-by-play (television) 2002–2006: NBA on ESPN
ESPN
and NBA on ABC
NBA on ABC
play-by-play 2005–2012: Indianapolis 500
Indianapolis 500
studio host 2006–2013: Saturday Night Football
Saturday Night Football
play-by-play 2007: NASCAR
NASCAR
on ABC studio host[45] 2007–2009: BCS National Championship Game
BCS National Championship Game
play-by-play ( ESPN
ESPN
Radio) 2014–2017: SEC Network
SEC Network
lead play-by-play 2017–present: Vegas Stats & Information Network[46]

References[edit]

Notes

^ "Pardon My Take: Brent Musburger
Brent Musburger
and Draymond Green/Reggie Miller (Sort Of, Not Really)". PodcastOne. Barstool Sports. Retrieved 30 August 2017.  ^ " Brent Musburger
Brent Musburger
(1939 – )". Montana Broadcasters Association. Retrieved August 26, 2011.  ^ " Brent Musburger
Brent Musburger
Biography (1939-)". www.filmreference.com.  ^ a b c "Not Just A Pretty Face". Sports Illustrated. Turner Sports & Entertainment Digital Network. January 16, 1984. Retrieved August 1, 2011.  ^ Richard Sandomir, Now on Film: Raised Fists And the Yogi Love Letters, The New York Times, August 6, 1999, accessed September 10, 2012. ^ Dave Zirin, After Forty-four Years, It's Time Brent Musburger Apologized to John Carlos
John Carlos
and Tommie Smith, The Nation, June 4, 2012, Accessed September 10, 2012. ^ Beall, Joel (January 25, 2017). "Remembering Brent Musburger's infamous stint with the Masters and golf coverage". Golf Digest.  ^ " Brent Musburger
Brent Musburger
explains history of 'March Madness' name". Sporting News. 2016-03-15. Retrieved 2017-01-26.  ^ Brent Musburger's Final CBS
CBS
Appearance 1990 on YouTube ^ Rusnak, Jeff (April 6, 1990). "Buck In Brent At Cbs". Sun Sentinel.  ^ "Brent bounces back". 1 June 1990.  ^ Foster, Jason (January 25, 2017). "Remember when Brent Musburger called baseball games?". Sporting News.  ^ Townsend, Mark (January 25, 2017). "Brent Musburger's greatest baseball call was one for the ages". Big League Stew.  ^ Sandomir, Richard (October 10, 1995). "PLAYOFFS 95: TV SPORTS;The Wrong Man in the Baseball Booth". The New York Times.  ^ Rabinowitz, Gershon (October 7, 2015). "Revisiting the 1995 Division Series". Baseball Essential.  ^ Star, HILARY KINDSCHUH / Lincoln Journal. "ABC's Musburger cited for consuming alcohol in motor vehicle".  ^ Video on YouTube ^ Hiestand, Michael (January 8, 2013). " ESPN
ESPN
apologizes for remarks about McCarron's girlfriend". USA Today.  ^ "Musburger, Palmer lead SEC Network
SEC Network
team".  ^ "Brent Musburger, Jesse Palmer
Jesse Palmer
will call 2014 Iron Bowl
Iron Bowl
on ESPN".  ^ "ESPN/ABC College Football Week 8 Slate: No. 2 Ohio State on ABC's Saturday Night Football
Saturday Night Football
and Two Top 25 SEC Matchups in Prime Time - ESPN
ESPN
MediaZone". espnmediazone.com.  ^ "Brent Musburger's third year in exile at SEC Network
SEC Network
is a travesty". 29 August 2016.  ^ Groller, Keith. " NCAA
NCAA
Football Bowl TV Schedule with announcers: Brent Musburger
Brent Musburger
back at the Rose Bowl".  ^ Connor Riley, WATCH: Brent Musburger
Brent Musburger
goes on lengthy rant regarding Joe Mixon comments, SEC Country, January 3, 2017. ^ A.J. Perez,ESPN's Brent Musburger
Brent Musburger
defends comments wishing Joe Mixon well in NFL, USA Today, January 3, 2017. ^ Chuck Schilken, Brent Musburger
Brent Musburger
angrily defends himself on air after Twitter users criticize his Joe Mixon comments, Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Times, January 3, 2017. ^ Fang, Ken (January 25, 2017). "THE BRENT MUSBURGER TIMELINE". Awful Announcing.  ^ Weber, Jim (January 25, 2017). "FORCED OUT AT ABC/ESPN, MYSTERIOUS NEW VENTURE TO BE FULLY DISCLOSED ON MONDAY". Awful Announcing.  ^ Lucia, Joe (January 25, 2017). "BRENT MUSBURGER IS RETIRING NEXT WEEK". Awful Announcing.  ^ a b Cindy Boren, ESPN
ESPN
official says the network learned that Musburger was thinking of retiring 10 days, Washington Post, January 25, 2017. ^ Brent Musburger
Brent Musburger
to Retire From ESPN
ESPN
Next Week, Associated Press, January 25, 2017. ^ Deitsch, Richard. " Brent Musburger
Brent Musburger
talks ESPN
ESPN
career, new Las Vegas venture". SI.com. Retrieved 2017-01-30.  ^ "Vegas Sports Information Network". Sport Information Traders. 2017-01-30. Retrieved 2017-01-30.  ^ "Listen Live Vegas Stats & Information Network". www.vsin.com. Archived from the original on 2017-01-31. Retrieved 2017-01-31.  ^ Mandel, Stuart (21 July 2004). "College Football Masters of the Mic". sportsillustrated.cnn.com. Archived from the original on 21 August 2004. Retrieved 1 February 2017.  ^ "The Ballad of Busty Heart, Boston's Super Fan - Boston Magazine".  ^ Hoppes, Lynn (2009-11-17). "Catching up with: Jenn Sterger". ESPN.com. Retrieved 2010-10-12.  ^ Pilon, Mary (2013-01-08). "Musburger Criticized for Remarks About Star's Girlfriend During Title Game". The New York Times. Retrieved 2013-01-09.  ^ "Musburger animates Cars 2
Cars 2
- ESPN
ESPN
Front Row". 24 June 2011.  ^ "Scuzzlebutt".  ^ Murschel, Matt (2011-11-03). " Brent Musburger
Brent Musburger
makes cameo on ABC's 'Happy Endings'". Orlando Sentinel. Archived from the original on 2012-11-27. Retrieved 2011-12-14.  ^ "Bowl Championship Series - Musburger, Brent". espn.go.com.  ^ a b c Reiss, Craig (June 1, 1990). "Brent bounces back". Entertainment Weekly.  ^ "I want my Musburger TV". CNN. June 25, 2004. Retrieved April 26, 2010.  ^ Pierce, Scott D. (12 January 2007). "Scott D. Pierce: Move over, football, hoops: NASCAR
NASCAR
is back on ESPN".  ^ https://www.vsin.com/news/brent-musburger-columns/

Bibliography

Sandomir, Richard "TV Sports: Now on Film: Raised Fists And the Yogi Love Letters", New York Times, 6 August 1999

External links[edit]

ESPN
ESPN
profile Brent Musburger
Brent Musburger
on IMDb

Preceded by Pat Summerall Play-by-Play announcer, NBA Finals 1975–1980 Succeeded by Gary Bender

Preceded by Jack Whitaker The NFL Today
The NFL Today
host 1975–1989 Succeeded by Greg Gumbel

Preceded by Bryant Gumbel Studio Host, College Basketball on CBS 1982–1984 Succeeded by Dick Stockton

Preceded by Gary Bender Play-by-Play announcer, NCAA
NCAA
Men's Basketball Final Four 1985–1990 Succeeded by Jim Nantz

Preceded by None Studio Host, Monday Night Football 1990–1995 Succeeded by Chris Berman

Preceded by Jim McKay U.S. World Cup Television Studio Host 1998 Succeeded by Terry Gannon

Preceded by Terry Gannon Lead Play-by-Play, Little League World Series 2000–2011 Succeeded by Karl Ravech

Preceded by Terry Gannon U.S. World Cup Television Studio Host 2006 Succeeded by Chris Fowler

Preceded by none ABC Saturday Night Football
Saturday Night Football
Play-By-Play Announcer 2006–2013 Succeeded by Chris Fowler
Chris Fowler
and Brad Nessler

Preceded by Keith Jackson Television Play-by-Play announcer, Rose Bowl 2007–2014 Succeeded by Chris Fowler

Preceded by Thom Brennaman Television Play-by-Play announcer, BCS National Championship Game 2010–2014 Succeeded by BCS defunct

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(analyst – Sundays) Deion Sanders
Deion Sanders
(analyst – Thursdays) Jason La Canfora (NFL insider) Jim Rome
Jim Rome
(contributor)

Former

Marcus Allen Terry Bradshaw Dick Butkus Charlsie Cantey Charley Casserly Irv Cross Randy Cross Mike Ditka Phyllis George Jerry Glanville Tony Gonzalez Greg Gumbel Craig James Brent Jones Jayne Kennedy Michael Lombardi Dan Marino Will McDonough Brent Musburger Jim Nantz Pat O'Brien Bart Scott George Seifert Shannon Sharpe Jimmy "The Greek" Snyder Lesley Visser

CBS
CBS
Sports NFL on CBS The NFL Today List of NFL Today personalities

v t e

Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
on CBS
CBS
Radio

Related programs

Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
on CBS
CBS
(1955–1965; 1990–1993) Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
Game of the Week (1985–1997) Sunday Night Baseball
Sunday Night Baseball
(1990–1997)

Related articles

Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
on the radio 1950 Brooklyn Dodgers season (simulcasts)

Commentators

All-Star Game ALCS ALDS NLCS NLDS World Series

Key figures

Marty Brennaman Steve Busby Jack Buck Gary Cohen Jerry Coleman Win Elliot Gene Elston Curt Gowdy Hank Greenwald Ernie Harwell Jim Hunter Harry Kalas Ralph Kiner Denny Matthews Frank Messer Bob Murphy Brent Musburger Ned Martin Lindsey Nelson Ross Porter Ted Robinson John Rooney Herb Score Vin Scully Dick Stockton Bill White

Color commentators

Sparky Anderson Johnny Bench Rick Cerone Al Downing Steve Garvey Brooks Robinson Duke Snider Jeff Torborg Joe Torre

Pre-1976 commentators

Mel Allen Red Barber Boake Carter Bob Elson Jack Graney Fred Hoey Ted Husing France Laux

Lore

1978 American League East tie-breaker game The Double (Seattle Mariners)

World Series games

Babe Ruth's called shot
Babe Ruth's called shot
(1932) Ladies and Gentlemen, the Bronx Is Burning (1977) Michael Sergio (1986) Kirk Gibson's 1988 World Series
1988 World Series
home run 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake

LCS games

Francisco Cabrera game (1992) Jeffrey Maier (1996)

AL Championship Series

1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1995 1996 1997

NL Championship Series

1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1995 1996 1997

AL Division Series

1981 1995 1996 1997

NL Division Series

1981 1995 1996 1997

All-Star Game

1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997

World Series

1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 (cancelled) 1995 1996 1997

v t e

NBA on ABC

Related programs

NBA Countdown NBA Access with Ahmad Rashad NBA Inside Stuff NBA Saturday Primetime NBA Sunday Showcase

NBA on ESPN

Radio NBA Wednesday NBA Friday WNBA on ESPN

NBA Drafts

2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016

Non-NBA programs

ESPN
ESPN
College Basketball on ABC Olympics on ABC

Related articles

Ratings (NBA Finals) Game history

Key figures

All-Star Game ESPN NBA Finals WNBA Finals

Play-by-play

Mike Breen Jim Durham Bill Flemming Chet Forte Jim Gordon Curt Gowdy Chuck Howard Keith Jackson Mark Jones Jim McKay Al Michaels Brent Musburger Brad Nessler Dave Pasch John Saunders Chris Schenkel

Color commentators

Greg Anthony Hubie Brown Bob Cousy Sean Elliott Len Elmore Tim Legler Mark Jackson Steve Jones Johnny Kerr Dan Majerle Jack Ramsay Doc Rivers Bill Russell Tom Tolbert Jack Twyman Jeff Van Gundy Bill Walton Jerry West

Sideline reporters

David Aldridge Doris Burke Howard Cosell Heather Cox Dave Diles Israel Gutierrez Mark Jones Sal Masekela Tom Rinaldi Craig Sager Lisa Salters Michele Tafoya Bob Wolff

Studio hosts

Michelle Beadle Dan Patrick Stuart Scott Sage Steele Hannah Storm Mike Tirico Michael Wilbon

Studio analysts

Jon Barry Chauncey Billups Chris Broussard Doug Collins Steve Javie Avery Johnson Magic Johnson George Karl Scottie Pippen Jalen Rose Byron Scott Bill Simmons

ABC Radio announcers

Marv Albert Dave Barnett Chick Hearn Rod Hundley Steve Jones Fred Manfra Earl Monroe Johnny Most Oscar Robertson Dick Vitale

NBA Finals

1965 (Games 1, 5) 1966 (Games 1, 5) 1967 (Games 2, 5) 1968 (Games 1, 4) 1969 (Games 3, 5-7) 1970 1971 1972 1973 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017

ABC Radio's coverage

1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990

WNBA Finals

2003 (Game 2 on ABC) 2004 2005 (Game 3 on ABC) 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 (Game 1 on ABC) 2011 2012 2013 2014 (Game 1 on ABC) 2015 (Game 1 on ABC) 2016 (Game 1 on ABC) 2017 (Game 1 on ABC)

All-Star Game

1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973

ABC Radio's coverage

1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990

Lore

Music "I think we see Willis coming out!" "The Block" Christmas Day

Rivalries

Bryant–O'Neal Lakers–Pistons Celtics–Lakers Cavaliers–Warriors

ESPN
ESPN
lore

Pacers–Pistons brawl

v t e

College World Series on CBS

Related programs

CBS Sports
CBS Sports
Spectacular Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
on CBS

Key figures

Greg Gumbel Sean McDonough Brent Musburger

Color commentators

Joe Carter Rick Cerone Steve Garvey Jim Kaat Jerry Kindall Ray Knight Fred Lynn Rick Monday Joe Morgan Jeff Torborg

Field reporters

John Dockery Michele Tafoya

World Series

1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002

v t e

Thoroughbred Racing on CBS

Related programs

CBS Sports
CBS Sports
Spectacular

Related articles

United States
United States
Triple Crown of Thoroughbred Racing on television

Sponsorship and broadcasting Broadcasting contracts

Commentators

Belmont Stakes Kentucky Derby Preakness Stakes

Key figures

Chic Anderson Fred Capossela Jack Drees Bryan Field Marshall Cassidy

Hosts

Mel Allen Win Elliot Brent Musburger Bud Palmer Chris Schenkel Jack Whitaker

Analysts

Don Ameche Eddie Arcaro Heywood Hale Broun Jimmy Snyder Frank I. Wright

Reporters

Charlsie Cantey Bill Corum Phyllis George Jim Kelly Pia Lindström John Madden Gil Stratton

Belmont Stakes

1948 1949 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985

Kentucky Derby

1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974

Preakness Stakes

1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976

v t e

Sports Lifetime Achievement Award

Jim McKay
Jim McKay
(1989) Lindsey Nelson
Lindsey Nelson
(1990) Curt Gowdy (1991) Chris Schenkel
Chris Schenkel
(1992) Pat Summerall
Pat Summerall
(1993) Howard Cosell
Howard Cosell
(1994) Vin Scully
Vin Scully
(1995) Frank Gifford
Frank Gifford
(1996) Jim Simpson (1997) Keith Jackson
Keith Jackson
(1998) Jack Buck
Jack Buck
(1999) Dick Enberg
Dick Enberg
(2000) Herb Granath (2001) Roone Arledge (2002) Ed Sabol and Steve Sabol
Steve Sabol
(2003) Chet Simmons (2004) Bud Greenspan (2005) Don Ohlmeyer (2006) Frank Chirkinian (2007) Dick Ebersol
Dick Ebersol
(2008) John Madden
John Madden
(2009) Al Michaels
Al Michaels
(2010) Jack Whitaker (2011) Not awarded (2012) Ted Turner
Ted Turner
(2013) George Bodenheimer (2014) Verne Lundquist
Verne Lundquist
(2015) Brent Musburger
Brent Musburger
(2016)

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 24324590 LCCN: no2005003035 ISNI: 0

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