HOME
        TheInfoList






Belligerents

Flag of Brazil (1889–1960).svg Liberal Alliance and tenentistas.

  • Coat of arms of the Brazilian Army.svg Brazilian Army
    • 3rd Military Region
    • 4th Military Region(majority)
    • 5th Military Region(majority)
    • 7th Military Region(majority)
    • other military organizations by country...


 Rio Grande do Sul
 Paraná
 Paraíba
 Minas Gerais

Flag of Brazil (1889–1960).svg First Brazilian Republic

  • Coat of arms of the Brazilian Army.svg Brazilian Army
    • 1st Military Region
    • 2nd Military Region
    • 6th Military Region (majority)


 São Paulo

Commanders and leaders Getúlio Vargas
Osvaldo Aranha
Juarez Távora
Gen. Augusto Tasso Fragoso
Admiral Isaías de Noronha
Cel. Góis Monteiro
Mrj. Plínio Tourinho Washington Luís
Júlio PrestesStrength ~50,000 approximately unknown

The Revolution of 1930 (Portuguese: Revolução de 1930),[1] was an armed movement in Brazil led by the states of Minas Gerais, Paraíba and Rio Grande do Sul, culminating in a coup. The revolution ousted President Washington Luís on October 24, 1930, prevented the inauguration of President-elect Júlio Prestes, and ended the Old Republic.Washington Luís deposed;

  • End of the Old Republic;
  • Vargas Era beginning.
  • Belligerents

    Flag of Brazil (1889–1960).svg Liberal Alliance and tenentistas.

    • Coat of arms of the Brazilian Army.svg Brazilian Army
      • 3rd Military Region
      • 4th Military Region(majority)
      • 5th Military Region(majority)
      • 7th Military Region(majority)
      • other military organizations by country...


    Flag of Brazil (1889–1960).svg Liberal Alliance and tenentistas.

    • Coat of arms of the Brazilian Army.svg Rio Grande do Sul
       Paraná
       Paraíba
       Minas Gerais

      Flag of Brazil (1889–1960).svgFlag of Brazil (1889–1960).svg First Brazilian Republic

      • Coat of arms of the Brazilian Army.svg Brazili


         
        São Paulo

        Commanders and leaders Portuguese: Revolução de 1930),[1] was an armed movement in Brazil led by the states of Minas Gerais, Paraíba and Rio Grande do Sul, culminating in a coup. The revolution ousted President Washington Luís on October 24, 1930, prevented the inauguration of President-elect Júlio Prestes, and ended the Old Republic.[2]

        In 1929, leaders of São Paulo broke the alliance with the mineiros (i.e. people from Minas Gerais state), known as the "coffee with milk policy" ("política do café-com-leite" in Portuguese), and indicated the paulista Júlio Prestes as a candidate for the presidency. In response, the President of Minas Gerais, Antônio Carlos Ribeiro de Andrada, supported the opposition candidate from the south, Getúlio Vargas.[3]

        On March 1, 1930, elections for President were held and victory was won by the government's candidate, Júlio Prestes, who was the president of São Paulo state. However, he did not take office because the coup was triggered on October 3, 1930; he was instead exiled.

        Getúlio Vargas assumed the leadership of the provisional government on November 3, 1930, a date that marks the end of the Old Republic.[4]

    [6]

    The 1930 deal made by politicians from São Paulo was bleak: they complained that, a

    The 1930 deal made by politicians from São Paulo was bleak: they complained that, after Julio Prestes in 1930, no citizen born in São Paulo was elected and held the Presidency except, and only for a few days, Ranieri Mazzilli, Dr. Ulysses Guimaraes and Michel Temer. The Paulistas also complained that only João Figueiredo reached the presidency (in 1979) as someone committed to the ideals of the 1932 revolution. Figueiredo was the son of General Euclides Figueiredo, the commander of the constitutional revolution of 1932 and who had been exiled to Argentina between 1932 and 1934. João Figueiredo created the "opening policy" of the military regime.

    Vargas was the first in Brazil to use personal advertisements touting himself and his political accomplishments on a large scale – the so-called cult of personality, amplified with the Voice of Brazil national radio, typical of fascism, but also predecessor to modern political marketing.

    The elite-proletariat alliance created by Vargas became standard in Brazilian politics, such as the PSD-PTB Alliance backed by the clandestine PCB (Brazilian Communist Party).

    Normal Exit PeriodicService.php