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Saint
Saint
Bonaventure
Bonaventure
(/ˈbɒnəˌvɛntʃər, ˌbɒnəˈvɛn-/; Italian: Bonaventura [bɔnavenˈtura]; 1221 – 15 July 1274),[2] born Giovanni di Fidanza, was an Italian medieval Franciscan, scholastic theologian and philosopher. The seventh Minister General of the Order of Friars Minor, he was also Cardinal Bishop
Cardinal Bishop
of Albano. He was canonised on 14 April 1482 by Pope Sixtus IV
Pope Sixtus IV
and declared a Doctor of the Church in the year 1588 by Pope
Pope
Sixtus V. He is known as the "Seraphic Doctor" (Latin: Doctor Seraphicus). Many writings believed in the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
to be his are now collected under the name Pseudo-Bonaventure.

Contents

1 Life 2 Feast day 3 Theology and works

3.1 Writings 3.2 Philosophy

4 Places, churches, and schools named in his honour

4.1 United States 4.2 Canada 4.3 Philippines 4.4 United Kingdom 4.5 Latin America 4.6 South Asia 4.7 Europe

5 Works 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External links

Life[edit] He was born at Bagnorea in Umbria, not far from Viterbo, then part of the Papal States. Almost nothing is known of his childhood, other than the names of his parents, Giovanni di Fidanza and Maria di Ritella.[3][4] He entered the Franciscan
Franciscan
Order in 1243 and studied at the University of Paris, possibly under Alexander of Hales, and certainly under Alexander's successor, John of Rochelle.[5] In 1253 he held the Franciscan
Franciscan
chair at Paris. A dispute between seculars and mendicants delayed his reception as Master until 1257, where his degree was taken in company with Thomas Aquinas.[6] Three years earlier his fame had earned him the position of lecturer on The Four Books of Sentences—a book of theology written by Peter Lombard
Peter Lombard
in the twelfth century—and in 1255 he received the degree of master, the medieval equivalent of doctor.[5] After having successfully defended his order against the reproaches of the anti-mendicant party, he was elected Minister General of the Franciscan
Franciscan
Order. On 24 November 1265, he was selected for the post of Archbishop
Archbishop
of York; however, he was never consecrated and resigned the appointment in October 1266.[7] During his tenure, the General Chapter of Narbonne, held in 1260, promulgated a decree prohibiting the publication of any work out of the order without permission from the higher superiors. This prohibition has induced modern writers to pass severe judgment upon Roger Bacon's superiors being envious of Bacon's abilities. However, the prohibition enjoined on Bacon was a general one, which extended to the whole order. Its promulgation was not directed against him, but rather against Gerard of Borgo San Donnino. Gerard had published in 1254 without permission a heretical work, Introductorius in Evangelium æternum (An Introduction to the Eternal Gospel). Thereupon the General Chapter of Narbonne promulgated the above-mentioned decree, identical with the "constitutio gravis in contrarium" Bacon speaks of. The above-mentioned prohibition was rescinded in Roger's favour unexpectedly in 1266.[8]

Bonaventure's coat of arms of Cardinal Bishop
Cardinal Bishop
of Albano

Bonaventure
Bonaventure
was instrumental in procuring the election of Pope
Pope
Gregory X, who rewarded him with the title of Cardinal Bishop
Cardinal Bishop
of Albano, and insisted on his presence at the great Second Council of Lyon
Lyon
in 1274.[5] There, after his significant contributions led to a union of the Greek and Latin churches, Bonaventure
Bonaventure
died suddenly and in suspicious circumstances. The 1913 edition of the Catholic Encyclopedia has citations that suggest he was poisoned, but no mention is made of this in the 2003 second edition of the New Catholic Encyclopedia. The only extant relic of the saint is the arm and hand with which he wrote his Commentary on the Sentences, which is now conserved at Bagnoregio, in the parish church of St. Nicholas.[9] He steered the Franciscans
Franciscans
on a moderate and intellectual course that made them the most prominent order in the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
until the coming of the Jesuits. His theology was marked by an attempt completely to integrate faith and reason. He thought of Christ as the "one true master" who offers humans knowledge that begins in faith, is developed through rational understanding, and is perfected by mystical union with God.[10] Feast day[edit] Bonaventure's feast day was included in the General Roman Calendar immediately upon his canonisation in 1482. It was at first celebrated on the second Sunday in July, but was moved in 1568 to 14 July, since 15 July, the anniversary of his death, was at that time taken up with the feast of Saint
Saint
Henry. It remained on that date, with the rank of "double", until 1960, when it was reclassified as a feast of the third class. In 1969 it was classified as an obligatory memorial and assigned to the date of his death, 15 July.[11] Theology and works[edit] Writings[edit] Bonaventure
Bonaventure
was formally canonised in 1484 by the Franciscan
Franciscan
Pope Sixtus IV, and ranked along with Thomas Aquinas
Thomas Aquinas
as the greatest of the Doctors of the Church
Doctors of the Church
by another Franciscan, Pope
Pope
Sixtus V, in 1587. Bonaventure
Bonaventure
was regarded as one of the greatest philosophers of the Middle Ages.[12] His works, as arranged in the most recent Critical Edition by the Quaracchi Fathers (Collegio S. Bonaventura), consist of a Commentary on the Sentences
Sentences
of Lombard, in four volumes, and eight other volumes, including a Commentary on the Gospel of St Luke and a number of smaller works; the most famous of which are The Mind's Road to God (Itinerarium mentis in Deum), an outline of his theology or Brief Reading (Breviloquium), Reduction of the Arts to Theology (De reductione artium ad theologiam), and Soliloquy on the Four Spiritual Exercises (Soliloquium de quatuor mentalibus exercitiis), The Tree of Life (Lignum vitae), and The Triple Way (De Triplici via), the latter three written for the spiritual direction of his fellow Franciscans. The German philosopher Dieter Hattrup denies that Reduction of the Arts to Theology was written by Bonaventure, claiming that the style of thinking does not match Bonaventure's original style.[13] His position is no longer tenable given recent research: the text remains "indubitably authentic".[14][15] A work that for many years was falsely attributed to Bonaventure, De septem itineribus aeternitatis, was actually written by Rudolf von Biberach (c. 1270 – 1329).[16] For St. Isabelle of France, the sister of King St. Louis IX of France, and her monastery of Poor Clares
Poor Clares
at Longchamps, St. Bonaventure
Bonaventure
wrote the treatise, Concerning the Perfection of Life.[2] The Commentary on the Sentences, written at the command of his superiors when he was twenty-seven,[12] is Bonaventure's major work and most of his other theological and philosophical writings are in some way dependent on it. However, some of Bonaventure's later works, such as the Lectures on the Six Days of Creation, show substantial developments beyond the Sentences.[17][18] Philosophy[edit] Bonaventure
Bonaventure
wrote on almost every subject treated by the Schoolmen, and his writings are very numerous. The greater number of them deal with philosophy and theology. No work of Bonaventure's is exclusively philosophical, a striking illustration of the mutual interpenetration of philosophy and theology that is a distinguishing mark of the Scholastic period.[12] Much of St. Bonaventure’s philosophical thought shows a considerable influence by St. Augustine. So much so that De Wulf considers him the best medieval representative of Augustinianism. St. Bonaventure
Bonaventure
adds Aristotelian principles to the Augustinian doctrine, especially in connection with the illumination of the intellect and the composition of human beings and other living creatures in terms of matter and form.[19] Augustine, who had introduced into the west many of the doctrines that would define scholastic philosophy, was an incredibly important source of Bonaventure's Platonism. The mystic Dionysius the Areopagite was another notable influence. In philosophy Bonaventure
Bonaventure
presents a marked contrast to his contemporaries, Roger Bacon, Albert the Great, and Thomas Aquinas. While these may be taken as representing, respectively, physical science yet in its infancy, and Aristotelian scholasticism in its most perfect form, he presents the mystical and Platonizing mode of speculation that had already, to some extent, found expression in Hugo and Richard of St. Victor, Alexander of Hales, and in Bernard of Clairvaux. To him, the purely intellectual element, though never absent, is of inferior interest when compared with the living power of the affections or the heart.[5]

St. Bonaventure
Bonaventure
receives the envoys of the Byzantine Emperor
Byzantine Emperor
at the Second Council of Lyon.

Like Thomas Aquinas, with whom he shared numerous profound agreements in matters theological and philosophical, he combated the Aristotelian notion of the eternity of the world vigorously (though he disagreed with Aquinas about the abstract possibility of an eternal universe). Bonaventure
Bonaventure
accepts the neo-Platonic doctrine that "forms" do not exist as subsistent entities, but as ideals or archetypes in the mind of God, according to which actual things were formed; and this conception has no slight influence upon his philosophy.[5] Due to this philosophy, physicist and philosopher Max Bernhard Weinstein
Max Bernhard Weinstein
contended that Bonaventure
Bonaventure
showed strong pandeistic inclinations.[20] Like all the great scholastic doctors, Bonaventura starts with the discussion of the relations between reason and faith. All the sciences are but the handmaids of theology; reason can discover some of the moral truths that form the groundwork of the Christian system, but others it can only receive and apprehend through divine illumination. To obtain this illumination, the soul must employ the proper means, which are prayer, the exercise of the virtues, whereby it is rendered fit to accept the divine light, and meditation that may rise even to ecstatic union with God. The supreme end of life is such union, union in contemplation or intellect and in intense absorbing love; but it cannot be entirely reached in this life, and remains as a hope for the future.[5] Like Aquinas and other notable thirteenth-century philosophers and theologians, Bonaventure
Bonaventure
believed that it is possible to prove the existence of God
God
and the immortality of the soul. He offers several arguments for the existence of God, including versions of St. Anselm's ontological argument and Augustine's argument from eternal truths. His main argument for the immortality of the soul appeals to humans' natural desire for perfect happiness, and is reminiscent of C. S. Lewis's argument from desire. Contrary to Aquinas, Bonaventure
Bonaventure
did not believe that philosophy was an autonomous disciple that could be pursued successfully independently of theology. Any philosopher is bound to fall into serious error, he believed, who lacks the light of faith.[21] A master of the memorable phrase, Bonaventure
Bonaventure
held that philosophy opens the mind to at least three different routes humans can take on their journey to God. Non-intellectual material creatures he conceived as shadows and vestiges (literally, footprints) of God, understood as the ultimate cause of a world philosophical reason can prove was created at a first moment in time. Intellectual creatures he conceived of as images and likenesses of God, the workings of the human mind and will leading us to God
God
understood as illuminator of knowledge and donor of grace and virtue. The final route to God
God
is the route of being, in which Bonaventure
Bonaventure
brought Anselm's argument together with Aristotelian and Neoplatonic metaphysics to view God
God
as the absolutely perfect being whose essence entails its existence, an absolutely simple being that causes all other, composite beings to exist.[10] Bonaventure, however, is not only a meditative thinker, whose works may form good manuals of devotion; he is a dogmatic theologian of high rank, and on all the disputed questions of scholastic thought, such as universals, matter, seminal reasons, the principle of individualism, or the intellectus agens, he gives weighty and well-reasoned decisions. He agrees with Saint
Saint
Albert the Great
Albert the Great
in regarding theology as a practical science; its truths, according to his view, are peculiarly adapted to influence the affections. He discusses very carefully the nature and meaning of the divine attributes; considers universals to be the ideal forms pre-existing in the divine mind according to which things were shaped; holds matter to be pure potentiality that receives individual being and determinateness from the formative power of God, acting according to the ideas; and finally maintains that the agent intellect has no separate existence. On these and on many other points of scholastic philosophy the "Seraphic Doctor" exhibits a combination of subtlety and moderation, which makes his works particularly valuable.[5] In form and intent the work of St. Bonaventure
Bonaventure
is always the work of a theologian; he writes as one for whom the only angle of vision and the proximate criterion of truth is the Christian faith. This fact influences his importance for the history of philosophy; when coupled with his style, it makes Bonaventure
Bonaventure
perhaps the least accessible of the major figures of the thirteenth century. This is true, not because he is a theologian, but because philosophy interests him largely as a praeparatio evangelica, as something to be interpreted as a foreshadow of or deviation from what God
God
has revealed.[22] In a way that is not true of Aquinas or Albert or Scotus, Bonaventure does not survive well the transition from his time to ours. It is difficult to imagine a contemporary philosopher, Christian or not, citing a passage from Bonaventure
Bonaventure
to make a specifically philosophical point. One must know philosophers to read Bonaventure, but the study of Bonaventure
Bonaventure
is seldom helpful for understanding philosophers and their characteristic problems. Bonaventure
Bonaventure
as a theologian is something different again, as is Bonaventure
Bonaventure
the edifying author. It is in those areas, rather than in philosophy proper, that his continuing importance must be sought.[23] Places, churches, and schools named in his honour[edit] United States[edit]

St. Bonaventure
Bonaventure
University, a Franciscan
Franciscan
university, in Allegany, New York Mission San Buenaventura
Mission San Buenaventura
and the City of Ventura, California, officially named San Buenaventura St. Bonaventure High School
St. Bonaventure High School
in Ventura, California, United States St. Bonaventure
Bonaventure
Monastery, a complex of religious buildings, built for the Order of Friars Minor Capuchin, located in Detroit, Michigan. Venerable
Venerable
Father Solanus Casey
Solanus Casey
served here as the monastery porter from 1924 to 1946, meeting visitors at the friary door. The site is a popular pilgrimage site for Metro Detroit
Metro Detroit
Catholics. Bonaventure
Bonaventure
Hall, in Sacred Heart Parish Catholic School, in Patterson, California, United States Bonaventure
Bonaventure
Residence Hall, in Viterbo
Viterbo
University, in La Crosse, Wisconsin, United States Buenaventura Boulevard in Redding, California St. Bonaventure
Bonaventure
Parish in Huntington Beach, California San Buenaventura de los Tres Arrollos, a lost settlement in the far NE of Custer County, Colorado San Buenaventura de Cochiti built in 1628 in [Pueblo de Cochiti, New Mexico] who remains the patron saint for Native American Village who celebrate on July 14. St. Bonaventure
Bonaventure
- St. Benedict the Moor (combined) parish, Jamaica, New York St. Bonaventure
Bonaventure
Church, in Paterson, New Jersey.

Canada[edit]

The town of Bonaventure, Quebec, Canada Bonaventure
Bonaventure
Highway in Quebec Place Bonaventure
Place Bonaventure
and the adjacent Bonaventure
Bonaventure
Metro Station in Montreal, Quebec Bonaventure Island
Bonaventure Island
and the Bonaventure River
Bonaventure River
in the Gaspé Peninsula Region of Quebec St. Bonaventure's College, a private Roman Catholic school, in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada St Bonaventure
Bonaventure
Catholic School, at Edwards Gardens, Toronto, Ontario, Canada St. Bonaventure
Bonaventure
School, Calgary, Alberta, Canada Lake Bonaventure, in the community of Lake Bonavista, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Philippines[edit]

St. Bonaventure
Bonaventure
chapel or Capilla de San Buenaventura in St. John the Baptist Parish, Liliw, Laguna, Philippines, erected in honor of the Seraphic Doctor, San Buenaventura because of the 1664 miracle were tears of blood were seen flowing from the eyes of the venerated image, which was witnessed by the Cura Parroco, Padre Juan Pastor and 120 witnesses; in recognition of this miracle, the first major bell in the church of Lilio was dedicated in honor of San Buenaventura Barangay San Buenaventura, a village in San Pablo City, Laguna, Philippines. Three small chapels can be found within the village in honour of Saint
Saint
Bonaventura St. Bonaventure
Bonaventure
Parish, Balangkayan Eastern Samar, Philippines St. Bonaventure
Bonaventure
Parish, Mauban, Quezon, Philippines

United Kingdom[edit]

St Bonaventure's Catholic School, in Forest Gate, London, England St Bonaventure's Catholic Church, and Primary School
Primary School
in Bristol, England

Latin America[edit]

The Municipality of Buenaventura on the Pacific Coast of Colombia The cities of San Buenaventura in Chihuahua, San Buenaventura in Coahuila, and San Buenaventura in the state of Mexico, all in Mexico

South Asia[edit]

St. Bonaventure's Church, a 16th-century Portuguese church is situated on the beach in Erangal near Mumbai. The annual Erangal Feast held on second Sunday of January, celebrating the Feast day of St. Bonaventure, attracts thousands of people of all faiths to this scenic spot. The Birthday Of St. Bonaventure
Bonaventure
is celebrated on 15 July every year. St Bonaventure's High School, a school in Hyderabad, Pakistan

Europe[edit] Bonaventuracollege is a Dutch Catholic Highschool situated in Leiden. Works[edit]

Bonaventure
Bonaventure
Texts in Translation Series, St. Bonaventure, NY, Franciscan
Franciscan
Institute Publications (15 volumes):

On the Reduction of the Arts to Theology, Translation, Introduction and Commentary by Zachary Hayes, OFM, vol. 1, 1996. Journey of the Soul into God
God
- Itinerarium Mentis in Deum translation and Introduction by Zachary Hayes, OFM, and Philotheus Boehner, OFM, vol. 2, 2002. ISBN 978-1-57659-044-7 Disputed Questions on the Mystery of the Trinity, translated by Zachary Hayes, vol. 3, 1979. ISBN 978-1-57659-045-4. Disputed Questions on the Knowledge of Christ, translated by Zachary Hayes, vol. 4, 1992. Writings Concerning the Franciscan
Franciscan
Order, translated by Dominic V. Monti, OFM, vol. 5, 1994. Collations on the Ten Commandments, translated by Paul Spaeth, vol. 6, 1995. Commentary on Ecclesiastes, translated by Campion Murray and Robert J. Karris, vol. 7, 2005. Commentary on the Gospel of Luke, translated by Robert J. Karris (3 vols), vol. 8, 2001-4. Breviloquium, translated by Dominic V. Monti, OFM, vol. 9, 2005. Writings on the Spiritual Life, [includes translations of The Threefold Way, On the Perfection of Life, On Governing the Soul, and The Soliloquium: A Dialogue on the Four Spiritual Exercises, the prologue to the Commentary on Book
Book
II of the Sentences
Sentences
of Peter Lombard and three short sermons: On the Way of Life, On Holy Saturday, and On the Monday after Palm Sunday, vol. 10, 2006.] Commentary on the Gospel of John, translated by Robert J. Karris, vol. 11, 2007. The Sunday sermons of St. Bonaventure, edited and translated by Timothy J. Johnson, vol. 12, 2008. Disputed questions on evangelical perfection, edited and translated by Thomas Reist and Robert J. Karris, vol. 13, 2008. Collations on the seven gifts of the Holy Spirit, introduced and translated by Zachary Hayes, vol. 14, 2008. Defense of the mendicants, translated by Jose de Vinck and Robert J. Karris, vol. 15, 2010.

The Life of Christ translated and edited by William Henry Hutchings, 1881. The Journey of the Mind into God
God
(Itinerarium mentis in Deum), Indianapolis: Hackett, 1993. ISBN 978-0-8722-0200-9 On the Reduction of the Arts to Theology (De Reductione Artium ad Theologiam), translated by Zachary Hayes, ( Saint
Saint
Bonaventure, NY: Franciscan
Franciscan
Institute, 1996. ISBN 978-1-57659-043-0 Bringing forth Christ: five feasts of the child Jesus, translated by Eric Doyle, Oxford: SLG Press, 1984. The soul's journey into God; The tree of life; The life of St. Francis. Ewert Cousins, translator (The Classics of Western Spirituality ed.). Mahwah, New Jersey: Paulist Press. 1978. ISBN 0-8091-2121-2.  The Mystical Vine: a Treatise on the Passion of Our Lord, translated by a friar of SSF, London: Mowbray, 1955. Life of St Francis of Assisi, TAN Books, 2010. ISBN 978-0-89555-151-1

References[edit]

^ " Anselm of Canterbury
Anselm of Canterbury
(1033–1109)", Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy, 2006, retrieved 10 November 2017  ^ a b M. Walsh, ed. (1991). Butler's Lives of the Saints. New York: HarperCollins. p. 216.  ^  Herbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "St. Bonaventure". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company.  ^ Hammond, Jay M. (2003). "Bonaventure, St.". In Marthaler, Bernard L. New Catholic Encyclopedia. Volume 2 (2nd. ed.). Detroit: Thomson/Gale in association with the Catholic University of America. p. 479. ISBN 0-7876-4006-9.  ^ a b c d e f g  One or more of the preceding sentences incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Bonaventura, Saint". Encyclopædia Britannica. 4 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. pp. 197–198.  ^ Knowles, David
David
(1988). The Evolution of Medieval
Medieval
Thought (2nd ed.). Edinburgh Gate: Longman Group. ISBN 978-0-394-70246-9.  ^ Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1996). Handbook of British Chronology (3rd ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. 282. ISBN 0-521-56350-X.  ^ Witzel, Theophilus (1912). "Roger Bacon". The Catholic Encyclopedia. 13. New York: Robert Appleton Company. Retrieved 12 February 2014.  ^ Laurence Costelloe (1911). Saint
Saint
Bonaventure: The Seraphic Doctor, Minister-general of the Franciscan
Franciscan
Order, Cardinal Bishop
Cardinal Bishop
of Albano. Longmans, Green & Company.  ^ a b Noone, Tim and Houser, R. E., " Saint
Saint
Bonaventure", The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Winter 2010 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.) ^ Calendarium Romanum. Libreria Editrice Vaticana. 1969. pp. 97, 130.  ^ a b c Robinson, Paschal (1907). "St. Bonaventure". The Catholic Encyclopedia. 2. New York: Robert Appleton Company. Retrieved 5 January 2013.  ^ Hattrup, Dieter (1993). Ekstatik der Geschichte. Die Entwicklung der christologischen Erkenntnistheorie Bonaventuras (in German). Paderborn: Schöningh. ISBN 3-506-76273-7.  ^ Schlosser, Marianne (2013). "Bonaventure: Life and Works". In Hammond, Jay M.; Hellmann, J. A. Wayne; Goff, Jared. A Companion to Bonaventure. Brill's Companions to the Christian Tradition. Boston: Brill. p. 12. n.7. ISBN 978-90-04-26072-6. This treatise has always been recognized as indubitably authentic. A few years ago, Dieter Hattrup voiced his doubts: 'Bonaventura zwischen Mystik und Mystifikation. Wer ist der Autor von De reductione?' Theologie und Glaube 87 (1997): 541–562. However, the recent research of Joshua Benson indicates the text's authenticity: 'Identifying the Literary Genre of the De reductione artium ad theologiam: Bonaventure's Inaugural Lecture at Paris', Franciscan
Franciscan
Studies 67 (2009): 149–178.  ^ "Identifying the Literary Genre of the "De reductione artium ad theologiam": Bonaventure's Inaugural Lecture at Paris". Franciscan Studies. Franciscan
Franciscan
Institute Publications. 67: 149–178. 2009. JSTOR i40092600.  ^ Hindsley, Leonard P. (March 1990). "Reviewed Work: De septem itinerabus aeternitatis. Mystik in Geschichte und Gegenwart, Abteilung I, Christliche Mystik Band 1 & 2 by Rudolf von Biberach, edited and translated by Margot Schmidt". Mystics Quarterly. Penn State University Press. 16 (1): 48–50. JSTOR 20716971.  ^ Ratzinger, J. (1971) Theology of History in St. Bonaventure, trans. Zachary Hayes, Chicago: Franciscan
Franciscan
Herald Press ^ White, J. (2011). "St. Bonaventure
Bonaventure
and the problem of doctrinal development". American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly. pp. 177–202.  ^ Brother John Raymond, "The Theory of Illumination in St. Bonaventure" ^ Max Bernhard Weinsten, Welt- und Lebensanschauungen, Hervorgegangen aus Religion, Philosophie und Naturerkenntnis (World and Life Views, Emerging From Religion, Philosophy and Nature) (1910), page 303: "Andere Ganz- oder Halbmystiker, wie den Alanus (gegen 1200), seinerzeit ein großes Kirchenlicht und für die unseligen Waldenser von verhängnisvoller Bedeutung, den Bonaventura (1221 im Kirchenstaate geboren), der eine Reise des Geistes zu Gott geschrieben hat und stark pandeistische Neigungen zeigt, den Franzosen Johann Gersan (zu Gersan bei Rheims 1363 geboren) usf., übergehen wir, es kommt Neues nicht zum Vorschein." ^ Frederick Copleston, S.J., A History of Philosophy, vol. 2 (Westminster, MD: Newman Press, 1950), p. 248. ^ McInerny, Ralph, A History of Western Philosophy, Vol.II, Chapter 5, "St. Bonaventure: the Man and His Work", Jacques Maritain
Jacques Maritain
Center, Notre Dame University ^ McInerny, Ralph, A History of Western Philosophy, Vol.II, Chapter 5, "St. Bonaventure: the Man and His Work", Jacques Maritain
Jacques Maritain
Center, Notre Dame University

Further reading[edit]

Hammond, Jay M. (2003). "Bonaventure, St.". In Marthaler, Bernard L. New Catholic Encyclopedia. Volume 2 (2nd. ed.). Detroit: Thomson/Gale in association with the Catholic University of America. pp. 479–493. ISBN 0-7876-4006-9.  Hammond, Jay M.; Hellmann, J.A. Wayne; Goff, Jared, eds. (2013). A Companion to Bonaventure. Brill's Companions to the Christian Tradition. Boston: Brill. ISBN 978-90-04-26072-6.  LaNave, Gregory F. "Bonaventure", in Paul L. Gavrilyuk and Sarah Coakley (eds.), The Spiritual Senses: Perceiving God
God
in Western Christianity, Cambridge: Cambridge, University of Cambridge, 2011, 159–173. Quinn, John Francis. The Historical Constitution of St. Bonaventure's Philosophy, Toronto: Pontificial Institute of Mediaeval Studies, 1973. Tavard, George Henry. From Bonaventure
Bonaventure
to the Reformers, Milwaukee: Marquette University Press, 2005 (Marquette Studies in Theology). ISBN 0-87462-695-1 ISBN 9780874626957. Tim Noone and R. E. Houser, " Saint
Saint
Bonaventure." Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/bonaventure/.

External links[edit]

Wikisource
Wikisource
has original text related to this article: Bonaventure

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Latin Wikisource
Wikisource
has original text related to this article: Scriptor:Bonaventura

Noone, Tim; Houser, R.E. " Saint
Saint
Bonaventure". In Zalta, Edward N. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.  St Bonaventure
Bonaventure
from the Franciscan
Franciscan
Archive. S Bonaventura: Opera Omnia Peltiero Edente (Latin original texts). Colonnade Statue St Peter's Square Works by Bonaventure
Bonaventure
at LibriVox
LibriVox
(public domain audiobooks)

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Theology

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Mariology

Assumption History Immaculate Conception Mariology of the popes Mariology of the saints Mother of God Perpetual virginity Veneration

Philosophy

Natural law Moral theology Personalism Social teaching Philosophers

Sacraments

Baptism Confirmation Eucharist Penance Anointing of the Sick

Last rites

Holy orders Matrimony

Saints

Mary Apostles Archangels Confessors Disciples Doctors of the Church Evangelists Church Fathers Martyrs Patriarchs Prophets Virgins

Doctors of the Church

Gregory the Great Ambrose Augustine of Hippo Jerome John Chrysostom Basil of Caesarea Gregory of Nazianzus Athanasius of Alexandria Cyril of Alexandria Cyril of Jerusalem John of Damascus Bede
Bede
the Venerable Ephrem the Syrian Thomas Aquinas Bonaventure Anselm of Canterbury Isidore of Seville Peter Chrysologus Leo the Great Peter Damian Bernard of Clairvaux Hilary of Poitiers Alphonsus Liguori Francis de Sales Peter Canisius John of the Cross Robert Bellarmine Albertus Magnus Anthony of Padua Lawrence of Brindisi Teresa of Ávila Catherine of Siena Thérèse of Lisieux John of Ávila Hildegard of Bingen Gregory of Narek

Institutes, orders, and societies

Assumptionists Annonciades Augustinians Basilians Benedictines Bethlehemites Blue nuns Camaldoleses Camillians Carmelites Carthusians Cistercians Clarisses Conceptionists Crosiers Dominicans Franciscans Good Shepherd Sisters Hieronymites Jesuits Mercedarians Minims Olivetans Oratorians Piarists Premonstratensians Redemptorists Servites Theatines Trappists Trinitarians Visitandines

Associations of the faithful

International Federation of Catholic Parochial Youth Movements International Federation of Catholic Universities International Kolping Society Schoenstatt Apostolic Movement International Union of Catholic Esperantists Community of Sant'Egidio

Charities

Aid to the Church in Need Caritas Internationalis Catholic Home Missions Catholic Relief Services CIDSE

Particular churches (By country)

Latin Church Eastern Catholic Churches: Albanian Armenian Belarusian Bulgarian Chaldean Coptic Croatian and Serbian Eritrean Ethiopian Georgian Greek Hungarian Italo-Albanian Macedonian Maronite Melkite Romanian Russian Ruthenian Slovak Syriac Syro-Malabar Syro-Malankara Ukrainian

Liturgical rites

Alexandrian Antiochian Armenian Byzantine East Syrian Latin

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West Syrian

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History of the Catholic Church

General

History of the Catholic Church

By country or region

History of the Papacy Timeline of the Catholic Church Catholic ecumenical councils History of the Roman Curia Catholic Church
Catholic Church
art Religious institutes Christian monasticism Papal States Role of Christianity in civilization

Church beginnings, Great Church

Jesus John the Baptist Apostles

Peter John Paul

Saint
Saint
Stephen Great Commission Council of Jerusalem Apostolic Age Apostolic Fathers Ignatius of Antioch Irenaeus Pope
Pope
Victor I Tertullian

Constantine to Pope
Pope
Gregory I

Constantine the Great
Constantine the Great
and Christianity Arianism Archbasilica of St. John Lateran First Council of Nicaea Pope
Pope
Sylvester I First Council of Constantinople Biblical canon Jerome Vulgate Council of Ephesus Council of Chalcedon Benedict of Nursia Second Council of Constantinople Pope
Pope
Gregory I Gregorian chant

Early Middle Ages

Third Council of Constantinople Saint
Saint
Boniface Byzantine Iconoclasm Second Council of Nicaea Charlemagne Pope
Pope
Leo III Fourth Council of Constantinople East–West Schism

High Middle Ages

Pope
Pope
Urban II Investiture Controversy Crusades First Council of the Lateran Second Council of the Lateran Third Council of the Lateran Pope
Pope
Innocent III Latin Empire Francis of Assisi Fourth Council of the Lateran Inquisition First Council of Lyon Second Council of Lyon Bernard of Clairvaux Thomas Aquinas

Late Middle Ages

Pope
Pope
Boniface VIII Avignon Papacy Pope
Pope
Clement V Council of Vienne Knights Templar Catherine of Siena Pope
Pope
Alexander VI

Reformation Counter-Reformation

Reformation Counter-Reformation Thomas More Pope
Pope
Leo X Society of Jesus Ignatius of Loyola Francis Xavier Dissolution of the Monasteries Council of Trent Pope
Pope
Pius V Tridentine Mass Teresa of Ávila John of the Cross Philip Neri Robert Bellarmine

Baroque
Baroque
Period to the French Revolution

Pope
Pope
Innocent XI Pope
Pope
Benedict XIV Suppression of the Society of Jesus Anti-clericalism Pope
Pope
Pius VI Shimabara Rebellion Edict of Nantes Dechristianization of France during the French Revolution

19th century

Pope
Pope
Pius VII Pope
Pope
Pius IX Dogma of the Immaculate Conception
Immaculate Conception
of the Virgin Mary Our Lady of La Salette Our Lady of Lourdes First Vatican Council Papal infallibility Pope
Pope
Leo XIII Mary of the Divine Heart Prayer of Consecration to the Sacred Heart Rerum novarum

20th century

Pope
Pope
Pius X Our Lady of Fátima Persecutions of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
and Pius XII Pope
Pope
Pius XII Pope
Pope
Pius XII Consecration to the Immaculate Heart of Mary Dogma of the Assumption of the Virgin Mary Lateran Treaty Pope
Pope
John XXIII Second Vatican Council Pope
Pope
Paul VI Pope
Pope
John Paul I Pope
Pope
John Paul II World Youth Day

1995 2000

21st century

Catholic Church
Catholic Church
sexual abuse cases Pope
Pope
Benedict XVI World Youth Day

2002 2005 2008 2011 2013 2016

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Francis

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History of Catholic theology

General history

History of the Catholic Church Early Christianity History of the papacy Ecumenical Councils Timeline of the Catholic Church History of Christianity History of Christian theology

Church beginnings

Paul Clement of Rome First Epistle of Clement Didache Ignatius of Antioch Polycarp Epistle of Barnabas The Shepherd of Hermas Aristides of Athens Justin Martyr Epistle to Diognetus Irenaeus Montanism Tertullian Origen Antipope Novatian Cyprian

Constantine to Pope
Pope
Gregory I

Eusebius Athanasius of Alexandria Arianism Pelagianism Nestorianism Monophysitism Ephrem the Syrian Hilary of Poitiers Cyril of Jerusalem Basil of Caesarea Gregory of Nazianzus Gregory of Nyssa Ambrose John Chrysostom Jerome Augustine of Hippo John Cassian Orosius Cyril of Alexandria Peter Chrysologus Pope
Pope
Leo I Boethius Pseudo-Dionysius
Pseudo-Dionysius
the Areopagite Pope
Pope
Gregory I

Early Middle Ages

Isidore of Seville John Climacus Maximus the Confessor Monothelitism Ecthesis Bede John of Damascus Iconoclasm Transubstantiation
Transubstantiation
dispute Predestination
Predestination
disputes Paulinus II of Aquileia Alcuin Benedict of Aniane Rabanus Maurus Paschasius Radbertus John Scotus Eriugena

High Middle Ages

Roscellinus Gregory of Narek Berengar of Tours Peter Damian Anselm of Canterbury Joachim of Fiore Peter Abelard Decretum Gratiani Bernard of Clairvaux Peter Lombard Anselm of Laon Hildegard of Bingen Hugh of Saint
Saint
Victor Dominic de Guzmán Robert Grosseteste Francis of Assisi Anthony of Padua Beatrice of Nazareth Bonaventure Albertus Magnus Boetius of Dacia Henry of Ghent Thomas Aquinas Siger of Brabant Thomism Roger Bacon

Mysticism
Mysticism
and reforms

Ramon Llull Duns Scotus Dante Alighieri William of Ockham Richard Rolle John of Ruusbroec Catherine of Siena Brigit of Sweden Meister Eckhart Johannes Tauler Walter Hilton The Cloud of Unknowing Heinrich Seuse Geert Groote Devotio Moderna Julian of Norwich Thomas à Kempis Nicholas of Cusa Marsilio Ficino Girolamo Savonarola Giovanni Pico della Mirandola

Reformation Counter-Reformation

Erasmus Thomas Cajetan Thomas More John Fisher Johann Eck Francisco de Vitoria Thomas of Villanova Ignatius of Loyola Francisco de Osuna John of Ávila Francis Xavier Teresa of Ávila Luis de León John of the Cross Peter Canisius Luis de Molina
Luis de Molina
(Molinism) Robert Bellarmine Francisco Suárez Lawrence of Brindisi Francis de Sales

Baroque
Baroque
period to French Revolution

Tommaso Campanella Pierre de Bérulle Pierre Gassendi René Descartes Mary of Jesus
Jesus
of Ágreda António Vieira Jean-Jacques Olier Louis Thomassin Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet François Fénelon Cornelius Jansen
Cornelius Jansen
(Jansenism) Blaise Pascal Nicolas Malebranche Giambattista Vico Alphonsus Liguori Louis de Montfort Maria Gaetana Agnesi Alfonso Muzzarelli Johann Michael Sailer Clement Mary Hofbauer Bruno Lanteri

19th century

Joseph Görres Felicité de Lamennais Luigi Taparelli Antonio Rosmini Ignaz von Döllinger John Henry Newman Henri Lacordaire Jaime Balmes Gaetano Sanseverino Giovanni Maria Cornoldi Wilhelm Emmanuel Freiherr von Ketteler Giuseppe Pecci Joseph Hergenröther Tommaso Maria Zigliara Matthias Joseph Scheeben Émile Boutroux Modernism Léon Bloy Désiré-Joseph Mercier Friedrich von Hügel Vladimir Solovyov Marie-Joseph Lagrange George Tyrrell Maurice Blondel Thérèse of Lisieux

20th century

G. K. Chesterton Reginald Garrigou-Lagrange Joseph Maréchal Pierre Teilhard de Chardin Jacques Maritain Étienne Gilson Ronald Knox Dietrich von Hildebrand Gabriel
Gabriel
Marcel Marie-Dominique Chenu Romano Guardini Edith Stein Fulton Sheen Henri de Lubac Jean Guitton Josemaría Escrivá Adrienne von Speyr Karl Rahner Yves Congar Bernard Lonergan Emmanuel Mounier Jean Daniélou Hans Urs von Balthasar Alfred Delp Edward Schillebeeckx Thomas Merton René Girard Johann Baptist Metz Jean Vanier Henri Nouwen

21st century

Pope
Pope
Benedict XVI Walter Kasper Raniero Cantalamessa Michał Heller Peter Kreeft Jean-Luc Marion Tomáš Halík Scott Hahn Robert Barron

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Medieval
Medieval
philosophers

Islamic

Early

Al-Jahiz Alkindus Ibn al-Rawandi Al-Razi (Rhazes) Al-Farabi
Al-Farabi
(Alpharabius) Ibn Masarra Al Amiri Ebn Meskavayh Ibn al-Haytham (Alhazen) Abu Rayhan Biruni "Brethren of Purity"

High

Ibn Sīnā (Avicenna) Ibn Hazm Al-Ghazali
Al-Ghazali
(Algazel) Abu'l-Barakāt al-Baghdādī Ibn Bajjah (Avempace) Ayn al-Quzat Hamadani Ibn Tufail Ibn Rushd (Averroes)

Late

Ibn Sab'in Shahab al-Din Suhrawardi Fakhr ad-Din ar-Razi Rashid al-Din Ibn Arabi Zachariah Kazwin Abd-el-latif Athīr al-Dīn al-Abharī Nasir al-Din al-Tusi Ibn al-Nafis Qutb al-Din al-Shirazi Ibn Taymiyyah Ibn Khaldun

Jewish

Medieval

Isaac
Isaac
Israeli ben Solomon Saadia Gaon Solomon
Solomon
ibn Gabirol Judah Halevi Abraham
Abraham
ibn Daud Maimonides Nachmanides Gersonides Hasdai Crescas Joseph Albo

Christian

Early

"Church Fathers" Augustine of Hippo Boethius Pseudo-Dionysius
Pseudo-Dionysius
the Areopagite Isidore of Seville Johannes Scotus Eriugena Alcuin

11–12th century

"Scholasticism" Anselm of Canterbury Peter Abelard Anselm of Laon Hugh of Saint
Saint
Victor Richard of Saint
Saint
Victor Roscelin Peter Lombard Alexander of Hales Bernard of Chartres Dominicus Gundissalinus Gilbert de la Porrée Alain de Lille

13–14th century

Robert Grosseteste Albertus Magnus Bonaventure Thomas Aquinas Siger of Brabant Boetius of Dacia Henry of Ghent Roger Bacon John Peckham Ramon Llull Petrus Aureolus Petrus Peregrinus de Maricourt Durandus Giles of Rome Godfrey of Fontaines Duns Scotus William of Ockham

Late

Jean Buridan Nicole Oresme Albert of Saxony Francesc Eiximenis Vincent Ferrer Paul of Venice Lambertus de Monte John Hennon

See also Renaissance philosophy

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Doctors of the Catholic Church

Gregory the Great Ambrose Augustine of Hippo Jerome John Chrysostom Basil of Caesarea Gregory of Nazianzus Athanasius of Alexandria Cyril of Alexandria Cyril of Jerusalem John of Damascus Bede
Bede
the Venerable Ephrem the Syrian Thomas Aquinas Bonaventure Anselm of Canterbury Isidore of Seville Peter Chrysologus Leo the Great Peter Damian Bernard of Clairvaux Hilary of Poitiers Alphonsus Liguori Francis de Sales Peter Canisius John of the Cross Robert Bellarmine Albertus Magnus Anthony of Padua Lawrence of Brindisi Teresa of Ávila Catherine of Siena Thérèse of Lisieux John of Ávila Hildegard of Bingen Gregory of Narek

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Saints of the Catholic Church

Virgin Mary

Mother of God
God
(Theotokos) Immaculate Conception Perpetual virginity Assumption Marian apparition

Guadalupe Laus Miraculous Medal Lourdes Fatima

Titles of Mary

Apostles

Andrew Barnabas Bartholomew James of Alphaeus James the Greater John Jude Matthew Matthias Paul Peter Philip Simon Thomas

Archangels

Gabriel Michael Raphael

Confessors

Anatolius Chariton the Confessor Edward the Confessor Maximus the Confessor Michael of Synnada Paphnutius the Confessor Paul I of Constantinople Salonius Theophanes the Confessor

Disciples

Apollos Mary Magdalene Priscilla and Aquila Silvanus Stephen Timothy Titus Seventy disciples

Doctors

Gregory the Great Ambrose Augustine of Hippo Jerome John Chrysostom Basil of Caesarea Gregory of Nazianzus Athanasius of Alexandria Cyril of Alexandria Cyril of Jerusalem John of Damascus Bede
Bede
the Venerable Ephrem the Syrian Thomas Aquinas Bonaventure Anselm of Canterbury Isidore of Seville Peter Chrysologus Leo the Great Peter Damian Bernard of Clairvaux Hilary of Poitiers Alphonsus Liguori Francis de Sales Peter Canisius John of the Cross Robert Bellarmine Albertus Magnus Anthony of Padua Lawrence of Brindisi Teresa of Ávila Catherine of Siena Thérèse of Lisieux John of Ávila Hildegard of Bingen Gregory of Narek

Evangelists

Matthew Mark Luke John

Church Fathers

Alexander of Alexandria Alexander of Jerusalem Ambrose
Ambrose
of Milan Anatolius Athanasius of Alexandria Augustine of Hippo Caesarius of Arles Caius Cappadocian Fathers Clement of Alexandria Clement of Rome Cyprian
Cyprian
of Carthage Cyril of Alexandria Cyril of Jerusalem Damasus I Desert Fathers Desert Mothers Dionysius of Alexandria Dionysius of Corinth Dionysius Ephrem the Syrian Epiphanius of Salamis Fulgentius of Ruspe Gregory the Great Gregory of Nazianzus Gregory of Nyssa Hilary of Poitiers Hippolytus of Rome Ignatius of Antioch Irenaeus
Irenaeus
of Lyons Isidore of Seville Jerome
Jerome
of Stridonium John Chrysostom John of Damascus Maximus the Confessor Melito of Sardis Quadratus of Athens Papias of Hierapolis Peter Chrysologus Polycarp
Polycarp
of Smyrna Theophilus of Antioch Victorinus of Pettau Vincent of Lérins Zephyrinus

Martyrs

Canadian Martyrs Carthusian Martyrs Forty Martyrs of England and Wales Four Crowned Martyrs Great Martyr The Holy Innocents Irish Martyrs Joan of Arc Lübeck martyrs Korean Martyrs Martyrology Martyrs of Albania Martyrs of China Martyrs of Japan Martyrs of Laos Martyrs of Natal Martyrs of Otranto Martyrs of the Spanish Civil War Maximilian Kolbe Perpetua and Felicity Saints of the Cristero War Stephen Three Martyrs of Chimbote Uganda Martyrs Vietnamese Martyrs

Patriarchs

Adam Abel Abraham Isaac Jacob Joseph Joseph (father of Jesus) David Noah Solomon Matriarchs

Popes

Adeodatus I Adeodatus II Adrian III Agapetus I Agatho Alexander I Anacletus Anastasius I Anicetus Anterus Benedict II Boniface I Boniface IV Caius Callixtus I Celestine I Celestine V Clement I Cornelius Damasus I Dionysius Eleuterus Eugene I Eusebius Eutychian Evaristus Fabian Felix I Felix III Felix IV Gelasius I Gregory I Gregory II Gregory III Gregory VII Hilarius Hormisdas Hyginus Innocent I John I John XXIII John Paul II Julius I Leo I Leo II Leo III Leo IV Leo IX Linus Lucius I Marcellinus Marcellus I Mark Martin I Miltiades Nicholas I Paschal I Paul I Peter Pius I Pius V Pius X Pontian Sergius I Silverius Simplicius Siricius Sixtus I Sixtus II Sixtus III Soter Stephen I Stephen IV Sylvester I Symmachus Telesphorus Urban I Victor I Vitalian Zachary Zephyrinus Zosimus

Prophets

Agabus Amos Anna Baruch ben Neriah David Dalua Elijah Ezekiel Habakkuk Haggai Hosea Isaiah Jeremiah Job Joel John the Baptist Jonah Judas Barsabbas Malachi Melchizedek Micah Moses Nahum Obadiah Samuel Seven Maccabees and their mother Simeon Zechariah (prophet) Zechariah (NT) Zephaniah

Virgins

Agatha of Sicily Agnes of Rome Bernadette Soubirous Brigid of Kildare Cecilia Clare of Assisi Eulalia of Mérida Euphemia Genevieve Kateri Tekakwitha Lucy of Syracuse Maria Goretti Mother Teresa Narcisa de Jesús Rose of Lima

See also

Military saints Virtuous pagan

Catholicism portal Saints portal

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 100905228 LCCN: n79043613 ISNI: 0000 0001 1774 1110 GND: 118513176 SELIBR: 180099 SUDOC: 027281701 BNF: cb118857861 (data) NLA: 36330595 NDL: 00433788 NKC: jn19981000304 ICCU: ITICCUCFIV29314 BNE: XX875

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