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Duane Charles "Bill" Parcells (born August 22, 1941),[1] also known as The Big Tuna,[2] is a former American football
American football
coach, best known as a head coach in the National Football League
National Football League
(NFL) for 19 seasons. He rose to prominence as the head coach of the New York Giants, whom he led to two Super Bowl
Super Bowl
titles. Parcells later served as the head coach of the New England Patriots, New York Jets, and Dallas Cowboys. Throughout his career, he coached teams that were in a period of decline and turned them into postseason contenders. He is the only coach in NFL history to lead four different teams to the playoffs and three different teams to a conference championship game. Becoming the head coach of the Giants in 1983, Parcells took over a franchise that had qualified for the postseason only once (1981) in the past decade and had only one winning record in their last 10 seasons. Parcells brought new success to the team and within four years, guided them to their first Super Bowl
Super Bowl
win. His tenure with the Giants spanned eight seasons and concluded with a second championship victory in Super Bowl
Super Bowl
XXV. After the Super Bowl
Super Bowl
win, Parcells retired as a coach in 1991. In 1993, Parcells came out of retirement to become the head coach of the Patriots, another struggling franchise at the time. Once again, Parcells changed the fortunes for the team and led them to an appearance in Super Bowl
Super Bowl
XXXI during his fourth season as their coach, although the game ended in defeat for the Patriots. Amid conflicts with Patriots owner Robert Kraft, he left the franchise after their Super Bowl
Super Bowl
loss and became the head coach of the Jets for the next season. Under Parcells, the Jets went from having only one victory in the previous season to obtaining a winning record, and they reached the 1998 AFC Championship Game in his second year with the team. After three seasons as the Jets' head coach, Parcells retired for a second time in 1999, but came back to football in 2003 to become the head coach of the Cowboys. He coached the Cowboys for four seasons and helped them qualify for the playoffs twice, although the team was eliminated in the first round each time. Following the team's loss in a 2006 NFC Wild Card game, Parcells retired from coaching for good in 2007. Since his final retirement from coaching, Parcells currently serves as an NFL analyst for ESPN
ESPN
and since 2014, has been an unofficial consultant for the Cleveland Browns. He was also the Vice President of Football Operations with the Miami Dolphins, a position he held from 2008 to 2010. In 2013, Parcells was voted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.[3] His life story, "Parcells: A Football Life" was co-authored by Bill Parcells and writer Nunyo Demasio, a former Washington Post reporter. The collaboration was released by Penguin Random House in late 2014, and soon became a New York Times bestseller.

Contents

1 Early life 2 College years 3 Collegiate coaching career 4 Professional coaching career

4.1 New York Giants 4.2 First retirement 4.3 New England Patriots 4.4 New York Jets

4.4.1 1997–98 4.4.2 1999

4.5 Dallas Cowboys

4.5.1 2003 4.5.2 2004 4.5.3 2005 4.5.4 2006

4.6 Third retirement 4.7 Miami Dolphins 4.8 Potential return to coaching

5 Head coaching record

5.1 College 5.2 NFL

6 Coaching tree 7 See also 8 Notes and references

Early life[edit] Parcells was born in Englewood, New Jersey, on August 22, 1941. He grew up in the nearby town of Hasbrouck Heights.[4][5][6] His mother, Ida Parcells (née Naclerio), was a housewife while his father, Charles (Chubby) Parcells, played quarterback at Georgetown University and worked for the FBI
FBI
before becoming a lawyer for Uniroyal Tires. Bill Parcells
Bill Parcells
is of Irish, Scottish, English, and Italian descent. Prior to his sophomore year in high school, the Parcells family moved a few miles north to the town of Oradell, where he attended River Dell Regional High School. While he was at River Dell, he was routinely mistaken for another boy named Bill. As he had always disliked his given name of Duane, he decided to adopt Bill as his nickname.[7][8] He and his wife lived on Pleasant Avenue in upscale Upper Saddle River, N.J., which was also home to the Parcells family.[9] Parcells was an athlete as a youth. He was large for his age (6'2" upon entering River Dell), which enabled him to become a standout player on his high school's football, baseball, and basketball teams.[10] His football coach at River Dell was Tom Cahill, who would later become the head coach at Army. His basketball coach at River Dell was Mickey Corcoran, whom Parcells considers to be "next to my father ... the most important influence in my life."[11] Corcoran would serve Parcells as an advisor and confidant throughout his coaching career.[12] College years[edit] Upon graduating from high school, Parcells arrived at Colgate University. As a freshman, he was offered a contract by the Philadelphia Phillies. His father disapproved of a career in sports and wanted him to study law, so the younger Parcells declined the offer. He soon transferred to the University of Wichita (now known as Wichita State University), where he played linebacker and earned a physical education degree.[13] He was drafted in the seventh round by the Detroit Lions, but was released by the team before playing a single NFL game.[8] Collegiate coaching career[edit] At the conclusion of his playing days, Parcells decided to pursue a career in coaching. He began as an assistant coach at Hastings (1964) before moving on to Wichita State (1965), Army (1966–69), Florida State (1970–72), Vanderbilt (1973–74), and Texas Tech (1975–77). In 1978, he became the head coach at the Air Force Academy for one season.[14] While serving as linebackers coach at Army, Parcells was also a part-time assistant basketball coach for Bob Knight
Bob Knight
during the 1966–67 season, which led to their longtime friendship.[15][16] Professional coaching career[edit] New York Giants[edit] In 1979, Parcells accepted an offer to become the defensive coordinator of the New York Giants
New York Giants
under head coach Ray Perkins but, before the season started, he resigned and took a job with a land development company in Colorado. While living in Colorado, Parcells became a season ticket holder with the Denver Broncos. Parcells called it the most miserable year of his life.[14] Feeling dissatisfied with his life away from football, Parcells returned to the sport in 1980 as the linebackers coach of the New England Patriots under Ron Erhardt.[14] The following season, Parcells was approached once again by Perkins to join the Giants' staff as an assistant coach, and Parcells accepted the offer. As defensive coordinator and linebackers coach, he was allowed to change the team's 4–3 defense
4–3 defense
to a 3–4 system.[14] When Perkins announced on December 15, 1982, that he was leaving the Giants at the end of the season to become head coach and athletic director at the University of Alabama, the Giants announced that Parcells would succeed him as head coach.[14] When Parcells took over in 1983, the New York Giants
New York Giants
were a team that had posted just one winning season in the previous ten years. In his first year, he made a controversial decision to bench Phil Simms
Phil Simms
in favor of Scott Brunner. The result was a disastrous 3–12–1 season during which the Giants surreptitiously offered Parcells' job to University of Miami head coach Howard Schnellenberger
Howard Schnellenberger
after a week 14 loss to the St. Louis Cardinals; however, Schnellenberger declined, and Parcells remained as head coach.[17] After this dismal first season, Parcells made Simms the starter again. The team's record improved to 9–7 and 10–6 over the next two years, and earned them their first back-to-back playoff appearances since 1961–1963. In 1986, he led the Giants to the first of two Super Bowls. In the 1986 season, the Giants compiled a franchise best 14–2 record and the first of three division titles. Parcells, whose stifling 3–4 defense
3–4 defense
(known as the Big Blue Wrecking Crew) led by Lawrence Taylor, Carl Banks, Harry Carson, and Leonard Marshall, and an offense under the direction of Phil Simms, knocked off the San Francisco 49ers 49–3, and the Washington Redskins
Washington Redskins
17–0, in the playoffs before routing the Denver Broncos, 39–20, in Super Bowl XXI. Parcells is credited as the first coach to be doused with Gatorade at the end of a Super Bowl, which led to a Super Bowl tradition. While there are some claims that Chicago Bears
Chicago Bears
coach Mike Ditka had been doused a year earlier,[18] NFL Films
NFL Films
president Steve Sabol has stated that he can find no evidence to support it in any footage he has reviewed and that he believes the tradition started with Parcells and Jim Burt.[19] Following the Super Bowl
Super Bowl
win, Parcells was courted by the Atlanta Falcons to become the head coach and general manager of the franchise. However NFL Commissioner
NFL Commissioner
Pete Rozelle
Pete Rozelle
would not allow Parcells to break his contract with the Giants and he stayed in New York.[20] Parcells led the Giants to a second Super Bowl
Super Bowl
in 1990. The Giants began the 1990 season 10–0, and finished 13–3, but lost Simms to injury late in the season. Playing with a back-up quarterback in Jeff Hostetler and a 33-year-old veteran running back in Ottis Anderson, the Giants convincingly defeated the Chicago Bears
Chicago Bears
in the divisional playoff, 31–3, and won in dramatic, come-from-behind fashion over San Francisco, 15–13, in the NFC Championship
NFC Championship
on a last-second 42-yard field goal by Matt Bahr which was set up by a Roger Craig fumble caused by nose tackle Erik Howard. Super Bowl
Super Bowl
XXV proved equally exciting as the Giants used tough defense, and a ball-control and power-running Erhardt – Perkins style offense to stop the Buffalo Bills, 20–19, whose own last-second 47-yard field goal attempt by Scott Norwood missed wide right. Parcells retired from football after Super Bowl
Super Bowl
XXV due to health problems. During his coaching tenure, the Giants had secured three division titles (1986, 1989, 1990), had only two losing seasons (the Giants went 6–9 during the strike year of 1987) and tallied an 8–3 playoff record. Parcells, along with former Giants head coach Tom Coughlin, have both made the NFL playoffs
NFL playoffs
five times as Giants head coach, and the two Super Bowl
Super Bowl
titles they each have won with the Giants have occurred in their fourth and eighth seasons with the franchise, respectively.[21] First retirement[edit] Following retirement, Parcells spent time as a football analyst for NBC Sports
NBC Sports
from 1991–1992, working as a commentator. He also hosted a local sports show in New York with Mike Francesa
Mike Francesa
entitled Around the NFL. In 1992, Parcells made a handshake agreement to become head coach of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. At the last minute, Parcells opted not to take the job. Parcells did not feel the situation was right for him at that time. Tampa Bay owner Hugh Culverhouse said, "I feel like I've been jilted at the altar."[22] New England Patriots[edit] After a two-year hiatus, Parcells returned to the NFL in 1993 as the head coach for the New England Patriots. Within two years, he coached the team to a 10–6 record and its first playoff game in eight years. In 1996, he led the Patriots to their first division title in 11 years, and only the second and third home playoff games in franchise history. The Patriots went all the way to Super Bowl
Super Bowl
XXXI, but lost to the Green Bay Packers, 35–21, in New Orleans. Parcells left the Patriots after disagreements with owner Robert Kraft. He had effectively been the team's general manager since arriving in New England, but felt Kraft would not allow him enough input in player personnel decisions. Upon his departure, Parcells famously stated: "They want you to cook the dinner; at least they ought to let you shop for some of the groceries. Okay?" This was mainly in reference to an incident in the Patriots' war room during the 1996 Draft. Parcells wanted to draft DE Tony Brackens with their first-round choice, but was vetoed by Kraft. They ultimately selected Ohio State WR Terry Glenn.[23] New York Jets[edit] Although Parcells had decided to leave New England, his contract did not allow him to coach anywhere else. The New York Jets
New York Jets
sought Parcells as head coach and general manager after a 4–28 record under Rich Kotite. To circumvent Parcells' contractual obligations, the Jets hired Bill Belichick
Bill Belichick
(then the No. 1 assistant to Parcells) as the Jets coach, and then hired Parcells in an "advisory" role. New England threatened legal action against Parcells and the Jets, but NFL Commissioner Paul Tagliabue
Paul Tagliabue
brokered a deal between the two sides, with New England releasing Parcells from his contract and the Jets giving New England a third and fourth round pick that year, a second-round pick the next year and a first-round draft choice the year after that. Jets owner Leon Hess
Leon Hess
gave Parcells complete control over football operations, the main sticking point in his dispute with Kraft. 1997–98[edit] Parcells again orchestrated a remarkable turnaround in his first year with the Jets. In his first season with the Jets, the team barely missed the playoffs with a record of 9–7 (the Jets were 1-15 the year before Parcells arrived, and had won a total of 10 games in the previous three seasons combined). In 1998, the Jets went to the playoffs with a current franchise-best 12–4 record, which was good enough for second place in the conference[24][25] and earned the Jets their third home playoff game since moving to New Jersey in 1984 (their first home playoff game was against the New England Patriots following the 1985 season), but lost to the eventual Super Bowl-champion Denver Broncos
Denver Broncos
in the AFC Championship Game. 1999[edit] In 1999, expectations were high for the Jets to go to the Super Bowl. However, quarterback Vinny Testaverde
Vinny Testaverde
ruptured his Achilles tendon in the Jets home opener and the season went downhill from there. After starting the season 1–6, the Jets won three straight and faced the Indianapolis Colts. Parcells emphasized the importance of not obtaining a "7th loss" but they did lose to the Colts and then to the New York Giants
New York Giants
the following week. At 4–8, the Jets were in danger of finishing below .500. The Jets would finish 8–8, but out of the playoffs. In 1999, Parcells retired from football for the second time, vowing that he would not coach again. He remained with the Jets one more year as general manager. To date, he is the only Jets coach to leave the team with a winning record after coaching at least two seasons. Dallas Cowboys[edit] Following three straight 5–11 seasons, Dallas Cowboys' owner Jerry Jones lured Parcells out of retirement and made him the head coach in 2003. 2003[edit] In his first season with the Cowboys, he led them to the playoffs with a 10–6 record (losing to the eventual NFC Champion Carolina Panthers in the opening round), thus making him the first head coach in NFL history to guide four different teams to the playoffs. 2004[edit] The 2004 season was one of turmoil. Starting quarterback Quincy Carter was terminated for alleged drug use in favor of 40-year-old veteran Vinny Testaverde, who had been brought to the Cowboys from the New York Jets by his former coach in the off-season. While a favorite of Coach Parcells, Testaverde proved ineffective as a starter. The Cowboys started strong, with victories against the Cleveland Browns and Washington Redskins, but injuries, older personnel, spotty play calling, and persistent penalties hobbled the Cowboys, and they quickly fell off to a 3–5 record by midseason, finishing the season 6–10. 2005[edit] The Cowboys improved their defense before the 2005 season with the additions of first round draft picks DeMarcus Ware
DeMarcus Ware
and Marcus Spears. Parcells drafted these players in hopes of jumpstarting the team's transition from the traditional 4–3 defense
4–3 defense
to a 3–4 defense, which Parcells had run in all of his previous stops. Jerry Jones
Jerry Jones
also added a number of high-priced older veteran players, acquiring nose tackle Jason Ferguson
Jason Ferguson
and cornerback Anthony Henry via free agency, and linebacker Scott Fujita
Scott Fujita
via the Kansas City Chiefs. On offense, the Cowboys felt the need to upgrade their passing game to complement their top 2004 draft pick, running back Julius Jones, and acquired quarterback Drew Bledsoe
Drew Bledsoe
via free agency. During his tenure, Parcells made a point of signing players who had played for him in the past, including Bledsoe, Terry Glenn (with the Patriots), Testaverde, cornerback Aaron Glenn, wide receiver Keyshawn Johnson, and fullback Richie Anderson with the Jets. In 2005, the Cowboys went 9–7, missing the playoffs by one game. 2006[edit] In 2006 the Cowboys signed controversial former Philadelphia Eagles wide receiver Terrell Owens. Keyshawn Johnson
Keyshawn Johnson
was released and signed with the Carolina Panthers. Owens, whom Parcells never referred to by name, but rather as "The Player", was fairly successful with the team. In week 7 of the 2006 season, Parcells decided to replace veteran quarterback Drew Bledsoe
Drew Bledsoe
with fourth year quarterback Tony Romo. The Cowboys were 6–4 with Romo as the starter. They finished the season with a 9–7 overall record but failed to win the NFC East Division after a 23–7 loss to the Philadelphia Eagles
Philadelphia Eagles
on Christmas Day in week 16 followed by a loss to the last-place team in the NFC North, the Detroit Lions
Detroit Lions
in week 17. They were able to clinch a playoff berth as the 5th seed in the NFC, eventually losing 21–20 against the Seahawks in Seattle on January 6, on a botched hold by Tony Romo during a field goal attempt. Parcells would finish his Dallas stint with a 34–30 record and no playoff wins. Parcells' greatest accomplishment as Cowboys coach was the development of QB Tony Romo. He signed Romo in 2003 and developed him into a Pro Bowl quarterback by 2006. Third retirement[edit] Parcells would have entered the final year of his contract with the Cowboys in 2007, and had been facing questions all year as to whether he would return to the Cowboys to coach his final season. With his 0–2 playoff record over four years as coach of Dallas, many had begun to wonder if the game had simply "passed him by." Immediately following the Cowboys' loss to the Seattle Seahawks, Parcells said that he was unsure if he would return in 2007, and the rumors about Parcells' future escalated. On January 9, the Newark Star Ledger
Newark Star Ledger
reported through anonymous sources that Parcells had contacted the New York Giants
New York Giants
about their available general manager position, but the Giants were not interested in Parcells' services.[26] Parcells, the next day, quickly refuted any interest in the Giants GM position, stating, "There is absolutely nothing to it. Whoever said it is a liar."[27] On January 22, 2007, he announced his retirement as head coach of the Cowboys after 4 years, apparently ending his coaching career.[28] Evidently, there are still questions as to his specific reasons for leaving the game. There were even reports that Parcells had been holding out for more money, and that Cowboys' owner Jerry Jones
Jerry Jones
simply did not think Parcells' performance was worth the money he was demanding for the upcoming season.[29] After retiring from coaching, Parcells became a studio analyst for ESPN. This was his fourth stint with the network, having worked there before accepting the job in Dallas, where he coached both the Dallas Cowboys and a little league team for charity. It was rumored that ESPN offered him a position on Monday Night Football, but Parcells declined the opportunity. (It is also worth noting that ESPN
ESPN
still held a contract with Parcells as a broadcaster even as he coached the Cowboys.) Miami Dolphins[edit] On December 19, 2007, the Miami Herald
Miami Herald
reported that Parcells had agreed to become the new Executive Vice President of Football Operations of the Miami Dolphins.[30] ESPN
ESPN
reported the following day that he signed a four-year contract.[31] Just a day prior, reports linking Parcells to the Atlanta Falcons' position of vice president of football operations were leaked.[32] However, the following day the Falcons formally announced that Parcells had turned down the offer because of discussions with Miami.[33] In the first season as Executive Vice President of Football Operations, Parcells fired head coach Cam Cameron, GM Randy Mueller, along with a few assistant coaches, after a 1–15 finish in the 2007 season. With vacancies at the GM and head coaching spots, he brought in Jeff Ireland
Jeff Ireland
to be the general manager and signed Tony Sparano
Tony Sparano
as head coach. The new front office under Parcells then signed over 20 little-known players in the free-agent market. In the 2008 draft, they drafted offensive tackle Jake Long
Jake Long
with the No. 1 overall pick, along with Phillip Merling, Kendall Langford, Chad Henne, Lex Hilliard, and Donald Thomas. They also signed undrafted free agents Dan Carpenter
Dan Carpenter
and Davone Bess. They also released fan favorite Zach Thomas, who would end up signing with the Dallas Cowboys, and traded star defensive end Jason Taylor to the Washington Redskins
Washington Redskins
for a second-round pick in the 2009 draft. The Dolphins then went on to sign quarterback Chad Pennington
Chad Pennington
(drafted by Parcells in his Jets days), who had been cut by the Jets to make room for Brett Favre.[34] The Dolphins finished the 2008 season 11–5 and became AFC East champions when Pennington and the Dolphins defeated Favre and the Jets in the final game of the season.[35] They finished with a 10-game improvement from the previous season, making the Dolphins one of two teams in NFL history to accomplish a 10-game turnaround, the other being the 1999 Indianapolis Colts. It was also the first time since 2001 that the Dolphins made the playoffs. However, they were routed in the first round by the Baltimore Ravens, 27–9. Parcells left the Dolphins in 2010.[36] Potential return to coaching[edit] In March 2012, New Orleans Saints
New Orleans Saints
head coach Sean Payton
Sean Payton
was suspended for the entire upcoming 2012 season by the NFL for not reporting a bounty system set up by his defense during 2009 and 2010. Upon his suspension, Payton asked his former mentor Parcells if he would be interested in filling the head coaching vacancy. On April 11, 2012, Parcells revealed in an interview with Mike Tirico
Mike Tirico
that he had decided against joining the Saints but would help Sean Payton
Sean Payton
in any way he could. Head coaching record[edit] College[edit]

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs

Air Force Falcons (NCAA Division I-A independent) (1978)

1978 Air Force 3–8

Air Force: 3–8

Total: 3–8

NFL[edit]

Team Year Regular Season Post Season

Won Lost Ties Win % Finish Won Lost Win % Result

NYG 1983 3 12 1 .219 5th in NFC East – – – –

NYG 1984 9 7 0 .562 2nd in NFC East 1 1 .500 Lost to San Francisco 49ers
San Francisco 49ers
in NFC Divisional Game

NYG 1985 10 6 0 .625 2nd in NFC East 1 1 .500 Lost to Chicago Bears
Chicago Bears
in NFC Divisional Game

NYG 1986 14 2 0 .875 1st in NFC East 3 0 1.000 Super Bowl
Super Bowl
XXI Champions

NYG 1987 6 9 0 .400 5th in NFC East – – – –

NYG 1988 10 6 0 .625 2nd in NFC East – – – –

NYG 1989 12 4 0 .750 1st in NFC East 0 1 .000 Lost to Los Angeles Rams in NFC Divisional Game

NYG 1990 13 3 0 .812 1st in NFC East 3 0 1.000 Super Bowl
Super Bowl
XXV Champions

NYG Total 77 49 1 .611

8 3 .727

NE 1993 5 11 0 .312 4th in AFC East – – – –

NE 1994 10 6 0 .625 2nd in AFC East 0 1 .000 Lost to Cleveland Browns
Cleveland Browns
in AFC Wild-Card Game

NE 1995 6 10 0 .375 4th in AFC East – – – –

NE 1996 11 5 0 .687 1st in AFC East 2 1 .667 Lost to Green Bay Packers
Green Bay Packers
in Super Bowl
Super Bowl
XXXI

NE Total 32 32 0 .500

2 2 .500

NYJ 1997 9 7 0 .562 3rd in AFC East – – – –

NYJ 1998 12 4 0 .750 1st in AFC East 1 1 .500 Lost to Denver Broncos
Denver Broncos
in AFC Championship Game

NYJ 1999 8 8 0 .500 4th in AFC East – – – –

NYJ Total 29 19 0 .604

1 1 .500

DAL 2003 10 6 0 .625 2nd in NFC East 0 1 .000 Lost to Carolina Panthers
Carolina Panthers
in NFC Wild-Card Game

DAL 2004 6 10 0 .375 3rd in NFC East – – – –

DAL 2005 9 7 0 .562 3rd in NFC East – – – –

DAL 2006 9 7 0 .562 2nd in NFC East 0 1 .000 Lost to Seattle Seahawks
Seattle Seahawks
in NFC Wild-Card Game

DAL Total 34 30 0 .531

0 2 .000

Total[37] 172 130 1 .569

11 8 .578

Coaching tree[edit] As of 2011, former Parcells assistants who are currently head coaches in either the NFL or the college ranks include:

Bill Belichick, New England Patriots Sean Payton, New Orleans Saints Mike MacIntyre, University of Colorado Mike Zimmer, Minnesota Vikings Todd Bowles, New York Jets Anthony Lynn, Los Angeles Chargers

In addition, former Parcells assistants who previously served as NFL or College head coaches include:

Ray Handley, New York Giants
New York Giants
(1991–92) Chris Palmer, Cleveland Browns
Cleveland Browns
(1999–2000) Al Groh, New York Jets
New York Jets
(2000), University of Virginia
University of Virginia
(2001–2009) Eric Mangini, New York Jets
New York Jets
(2006–2008), Cleveland Browns (2009–2010) Tony Sparano, Miami Dolphins
Miami Dolphins
(2008–2011). Oakland Raiders
Oakland Raiders
(2014, Interim) Romeo Crennel, Cleveland Browns
Cleveland Browns
(2005–2008), Kansas City Chiefs (2011–2012) Todd Haley, Kansas City Chiefs
Kansas City Chiefs
(2009–2011) Charlie Weis, Notre Dame (2005–2009), University of Kansas (2012–2014) Tom Coughlin, Jacksonville Jaguars
Jacksonville Jaguars
(1995–2002), New York Giants (2004–2015)

See also[edit]

History of the New York Giants
New York Giants
(1979–93) List of National Football League
National Football League
head coaches with 50 wins

Notes and references[edit]

^ Gutman, Bill (2000). Parcells: A Biography. Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc. Retrieved 2008-03-08.  ^ " Bill Parcells
Bill Parcells
"The Tuna"". chickenortuna.com. 1997. Retrieved 2010-07-27.  "I think it goes back to my first time with the Patriots. There was an old commercial from StarKist with Charlie the StarKist tuna. So my players were trying to con me on something one time, and I said, 'You must think I'm Charlie the Tuna.'" ^ Corbett, Jim (February 2, 2013). "Parcells, Carter finally make Pro Football Hall of Fame". USA Today. Retrieved 2 February 2013.  ^ "For Parcells, there is no greater game".  ^ ""Bill and Don shared a bed in the family's small house in Hasbrouck Heights, N.J."".  ^ "Bill is his nickname. His real name is Duane Charles Parcells, but once he became a teen-ager only his mother called him Duane. He was raised in Hasbrouck Heights, N.J., and everyone knew him as Duane except his fourth-grade teacher. She used to say, Duane Parcells, is she here?" ^ ""Young Bill usually got his way, even when it came to unofficially changing his birth name, Duane Charles, which Doug said his brother "always hated.' Assigned to a new school, River Dell High, in his sophomore year, he found that students confused him with a boy named Bill. So Parcells adopted the name and made it stick."".  ^ a b "THE TWO SIDES OF BILL PARCELLS". The New York Times. January 19, 1987.  ^ OATES, BOB (October 24, 1989). "Through the Wars : New York Giants Are Riding High After a History of Ups and Downs" – via LA Times.  ^ Puma, Mike. Parcells made struggling franchises into winners, ESPN.com. Accessed October 11, 2006. "When he entered River Dell High School in 1955, Parcells was one of the biggest kids in his class at 6-foot-2 and 180 pounds." ^ Gutman, Bill (2000). Parcells: A Biography, p. 17. Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc. ^ Art, Stapleton,. "Stapleton: Mickey Corcoran's captivating trip down memory lane".  ^ ""Charles viewed sports as a healthy diversion, but wanted his son to study law. Bill decided to play football in college. He was a freshman at Colgate when the Philadelphia Phillies
Philadelphia Phillies
offered him a contract. Charles quickly nixed that idea. Parcells then transferred to the University of Wichita (now Wichita State), where he played linebacker in 1958–59 and earned a physical education degree."".  ^ a b c d e Litsky, Frank (September 13, 1987). "SUPER BOWL XXI: THE GIANTS VS. THE BRONCOS; THE TWO SIDES OF BILL PARCELLS" – via www.nytimes.com.  ^ http://www.mahalo.com/Bill_Parcells " Bill Parcells
Bill Parcells
started his [head] coaching career with the Air Force Academy and was part-time assistant basketball coach at Army, while Bobby Knight was the head coach." ^ "Knight equals Dean Smith on all-time wins list after Texas Tech tops Bucknell". USA Today. 2006-12-23. Retrieved 2010-04-26.  ^ "Young Is Angry". The New York Times. 1983-12-12. Retrieved 2010-04-26.  ^ "ESPN.com: Page 2 : How the dunk was born".  ^ Borden, Sam (2012-01-20). "A Splashy Tradition, Gatorade Style". The New York Times.  ^ Myers, Gary (2007-12-19). "Report: Bill Parcells
Bill Parcells
considering Falcons' VP of football operations post". Daily News. New York.  ^ "As Bill Parcells
Bill Parcells
enters Football Hall, Tom Coughlin's resume displays Fame appeal". Daily News. New York. 2013-08-03.  ^ "With Parcells, it's the same old song, different verse". Sports Illustrated. Associated Press. 2002-01-19. Retrieved 2007-01-02.  ^ "Give Parcells picks, he will Find gold".  ^ https://www.pro-football-reference.com/years/1998/ – 1998 NFL Standings, Team & Offensive StatisticsPro-Football-Reference.com ^ "1998 NFL Standings - The Football Database".  ^ "Giants: Say no thanks to Parcells". Newark Star-Ledger. January 9, 2007. Archived from the original on January 11, 2007. Retrieved January 9, 2007.  ^ "Parcells denies interest in Giants' GM job". MSNBC. 2007-01-10. Archived from the original on January 24, 2007. Retrieved 2007-01-22.  ^ [1] Archived January 25, 2007, at the Wayback Machine. ^ "SI.com – Money men – Jul 2, 2007". CNN. 2007-07-02. Retrieved 2010-04-26.  ^ "Parcells accepts top job with Dolphins – December 19, 2007 – MiamiHerald.com".  ^ "Parcells inks 4-year deal as Dolphins VP". December 20, 2007.  ^ "Parcells says he'll likely accept Falcons' VP offer". December 19, 2007.  ^ "11Alive.com - Atlanta, GA - Parcells Leaves Falcons At Altar".  ^ "The Tuna has reeled in a starting QB and some sizable Fish up front. The verdict: bigger, and a bit better". Sports Illustrated. 2008-09-01. Retrieved 2009-01-20.  ^ "Pennington finds redemption in New York". MSNBC. 2008-12-28. Archived from the original on January 22, 2009. Retrieved 2009-01-20.  ^ Wilkening, Mike (July 17, 2013). " Bill Parcells
Bill Parcells
believes his departure hurt the Dolphins". NBC Sports. Retrieved February 16, 2015.  ^ " Bill Parcells
Bill Parcells
Record, Statistics, and Category Ranks - Pro-Football-Reference.com". 

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Air Force Falcons head football coaches

Robert V. Whitlow
Robert V. Whitlow
(1955) Buck Shaw
Buck Shaw
(1956–1957) Ben Martin (1958–1977) Bill Parcells
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(1930) Steve Owen (1931–1953) Jim Lee Howell (1954–1960) Allie Sherman (1961–1968) Alex Webster (1969–1973) Bill Arnsparger (1974–1976) John McVay (1976–1978) Ray Perkins (1979–1982) Bill Parcells
Bill Parcells
(1983–1990) Ray Handley (1991–1992) Dan Reeves
Dan Reeves
(1993–1996) Jim Fassel (1997–2003) Tom Coughlin
Tom Coughlin
(2004–2015) Ben McAdoo
Ben McAdoo
(2016–2017) Steve Spagnuolo
Steve Spagnuolo
# (2017) Pat Shurmur
Pat Shurmur
(2018– )

Pound sign (#) denotes interim head coach

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Boston / New England Patriots
New England Patriots
head coaches

Lou Saban
Lou Saban
(1960–1961) Mike Holovak
Mike Holovak
(1961–1968) Clive Rush (1969–1970) John Mazur
John Mazur
(1970–1972) Phil Bengtson # (1972) Chuck Fairbanks (1973–1978) Hank Bullough & Ron Erhardt # (1978) Ron Erhardt (1979–1981) Ron Meyer (1982–1984) Raymond Berry
Raymond Berry
(1984–1989) Rod Rust (1990) Dick MacPherson (1991–1992) Bill Parcells
Bill Parcells
(1993–1996) Pete Carroll
Pete Carroll
(1997–1999) Bill Belichick
Bill Belichick
(2000– )

Pound sign (#) denotes interim head coach.

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Boston / New England Patriots
New England Patriots
general managers

Edward McKeever (1960–1961) Mike Holovak
Mike Holovak
(1961–1968) George Sauer
George Sauer
(1969–1970) Upton Bell (1971–1972) Peter Hadhazy * Chuck Fairbanks Bucko Kilroy
Bucko Kilroy
(1979–1982) Patrick Sullivan (1983–1990) Sam Jankovich # (1990–1993) Bill Parcells
Bill Parcells
# (1993–1996) Bobby Grier # (1996–2000) Bill Belichick
Bill Belichick
# (2000– )

Asterisk (*) denotes acting general manager. Pound sign (#) denotes de facto general manager.

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New York Titans / Jets head coaches

Sammy Baugh
Sammy Baugh
(1960–1961) Bulldog Turner
Bulldog Turner
(1962) Weeb Ewbank (1963–1973) Charley Winner (1974–1975) Ken Shipp # (1975) Lou Holtz
Lou Holtz
(1976) Mike Holovak
Mike Holovak
# (1976) Walt Michaels
Walt Michaels
(1977–1982) Joe Walton
Joe Walton
(1983–1989) Bruce Coslet (1990–1993) Pete Carroll
Pete Carroll
(1994) Rich Kotite (1995–1996) Bill Parcells
Bill Parcells
(1997–1999) Al Groh
Al Groh
(2000) Herman Edwards (2001–2005) Eric Mangini
Eric Mangini
(2006–2008) Rex Ryan
Rex Ryan
(2009–2014) Todd Bowles (2015– )

Pound sign (#) denotes interim head coach.

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New York Titans / Jets general managers

Steve Sebo (1960–1962) George Sauer
George Sauer
(1962) Weeb Ewbank * (1963–1974) Al Ward (1975–1977) Jim Kensil (1977–1987) Joe Walton
Joe Walton
* (1988–1989) Dick Steinberg (1990–1994) Dick Haley # (1994) Rich Kotite * (1995–1996) Bill Parcells
Bill Parcells
* (1997–2000) Terry Bradway (2001–2006) Mike Tannenbaum (2006–2012) John Idzik, Jr. (2013–2014) Mike Maccagnan (2015– )

Asterisk (*) denotes de facto general manager. Pound sign (#) denotes interim general manager.

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Dallas Cowboys
Dallas Cowboys
head coaches

Tom Landry
Tom Landry
(1960–1988) Jimmy Johnson (1989–1993) Barry Switzer (1994–1997) Chan Gailey (1998–1999) Dave Campo (2000–2002) Bill Parcells
Bill Parcells
(2003–2006) Wade Phillips
Wade Phillips
(2007–2010) Jason Garrett
Jason Garrett
(2010– )

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New York Giants
New York Giants
Super Bowl
Super Bowl
XXI champions

2 Raul Allegre 3 Joe Cooper 5 Sean Landeta 9 Bob Thomas 11 Phil Simms
Phil Simms
(MVP) 15 Jeff Hostetler 17 Jeff Rutledge 20 Joe Morris 22 Lee Rouson 23 Perry Williams 24 Ottis Anderson 25 Mark Collins 27 Herb Welch 28 Tom Flynn 30 Tony Galbreath 33 George Adams 34 Elvis Patterson 34 Terry Kinard 44 Maurice Carthon 46 Greg Lasker 48 Kenny Hill 51 Robbie Jones 52 Pepper Johnson 53 Harry Carson 54 Andy Headen 55 Gary Reasons 56 Lawrence Taylor 57 Byron Hunt 58 Carl Banks 59 Brian Johnston 60 Brad Benson 61 Chris Godfrey 63 Karl Nelson 64 Jim Burt 65 Bart Oates 66 William Roberts 67 Billy Ard 68 Damian Johnson 70 Leonard Marshall 73 John Washington 74 Erik Howard 75 George Martin 76 Curtis McGriff 77 Eric Dorsey 78 Jerome Sally 80 Phil McConkey 81 Stacy Robinson 83 Vince Warren 84 Zeke Mowatt 86 Lionel Manuel 87 Solomon Miller 88 Bobby Johnson 89 Mark Bavaro

Head coach: Bill Parcells

Coaches: Bill Belichick Romeo Crennel Ron Erhardt Len Fontes Ray Handley Fred Hoaglin Pat Hodgson Lamar Leachman Johnny Parker Mike Pope Mike Sweatman

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New York Giants
New York Giants
Super Bowl
Super Bowl
XXV champions

2 Raul Allegre 3 Matt Stover 5 Sean Landeta 6 Matt Cavanaugh 9 Matt Bahr 11 Phil Simms 15 Jeff Hostetler 21 Reyna Thompson 22 Lee Rouson 23 Perry Williams 24 Ottis Anderson
Ottis Anderson
(MVP) 25 Mark Collins 26 Dave Duerson 27 Rodney Hampton 28 Everson Walls 29 Myron Guyton 30 Dave Meggett 34 Lewis Tillman 43 David Whitmore 44 Maurice Carthon 46 Roger Brown 47 Greg Jackson 51 Bobby Abrams 52 Pepper Johnson 55 Gary Reasons 56 Lawrence Taylor 57 Larry McGrew 58 Carl Banks 59 Brian Williams 60 Eric Moore 61 Bob Kratch 64 Tom Rehder 65 Bart Oates 66 William Roberts 70 Leonard Marshall 72 Doug Riesenberg 73 John Washington 74 Erik Howard 76 Jumbo Elliott 77 Eric Dorsey 80 Bob Mrosko 81 Stacy Robinson 82 Mark Ingram 83 Odessa Turner 84 Troy Kyles 85 Stephen Baker 86 Lionel Manuel 87 Howard Cross 89 Mark Bavaro 93 Mike Fox 98 Johnie Cooks 99 Steve DeOssie

Head coach: Bill Parcells

Coaches: Bill Belichick Romeo Crennel Tom Coughlin Ron Erhardt Al Groh Ray Handley Fred Hoaglin Johnny Parker Mike Pope Mike Sweatman Bob Trott Charlie Weis

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Associated Press NFL Coach of the Year Award
Associated Press NFL Coach of the Year Award
winners

1957: Wilson 1958: Ewbank 1959: Lombardi 1960: Shaw 1961: Sherman 1962: Sherman 1963: Halas 1964: Shula 1965: Halas 1966: Landry 1967: Allen & Shula 1968: Shula 1969: Grant 1970: Nolan 1971: Allen 1972: Shula 1973: Knox 1974: Coryell 1975: Marchibroda 1976: Gregg 1977: Miller 1978: Patera 1979: Pardee 1980: Knox 1981: Walsh 1982: Gibbs 1983: Gibbs 1984: Knox 1985: Ditka 1986: Parcells 1987: Mora 1988: Ditka 1989: Infante 1990: Johnson 1991: Fontes 1992: Cowher 1993: Reeves 1994: Parcells 1995: Rhodes 1996: Capers 1997: Fassel 1998: Reeves 1999: Vermeil 2000: Haslett 2001: Jauron 2002: Reid 2003: Belichick 2004: Schottenheimer 2005: L. Smith 2006: Payton 2007: Belichick 2008: M. Smith 2009: Lewis 2010: Belichick 2011: Harbaugh 2012: Arians 2013: Rivera 2014: Arians 2015: Rivera 2016: Garrett 2017: McVay

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National Football League
National Football League
NFL's 1990s All-Decade Team

Brett Favre John Elway Barry Sanders Emmitt Smith Terrell Davis Thurman Thomas Cris Carter Jerry Rice Tim Brown Michael Irvin Shannon Sharpe Ben Coates Willie Roaf Gary Zimmerman Tony Boselli Richmond Webb Bruce Matthews Randall McDaniel Larry Allen Steve Wisniewski Dermontti Dawson Mark Stepnoski Bruce Smith Reggie White Chris Doleman Neil Smith Cortez Kennedy John Randle Warren Sapp Bryant Young Kevin Greene Junior Seau Derrick Thomas Cornelius Bennett Hardy Nickerson Levon Kirkland Deion Sanders Rod Woodson Darrell Green Aeneas Williams Steve Atwater LeRoy Butler Carnell Lake Ronnie Lott Darren Bennett Sean Landeta Morten Andersen Gary Anderson Mel Gray Michael Bates Bill Parcells Marv Levy

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New England Patriots
New England Patriots
All-1990s Team

Offense Bledsoe (QB) Martin (RB) Russell (RB) Glenn (WR) Jefferson (WR) Coates (TE) Armstrong (T) Harlow (T) Rucci (G) Lane (G) Wohlabaugh (C)

Defense McGinest (DE) Williams (DE) Goad (NT) Tippett (OLB) Slade (OLB) Brown (ILB) Johnson (ILB) Hurst (CB) Law (CB) Clay (S) Milloy (S)

Special
Special
Teams Meggett (Ret.) Vinatieri (PK) Tupa (P) Whigham (ST)

Coach Parcells

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New York Giants
New York Giants
Ring of Honor

Ernie Accorsi Jessie Armstead Tiki Barber Al Blozis Rosey Brown Harry Carson Charlie Conerly Tom Coughlin Frank Gifford Pete Gogolak Mel Hein Jim Lee Howell Sam Huff John Johnson Tuffy Leemans Dick Lynch Jack Mara Tim Mara Wellington Mara George Martin Joe Morrison Steve Owen Bill Parcells Andy Robustelli Phil Simms Michael Strahan Ken Strong Lawrence Taylor Bob Tisch Y. A. Tittle Amani Toomer Justin Tuck Emlen Tunnell Osi Umenyiora George Young

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Pro Football Hall of Fame
Pro Football Hall of Fame
Class of 2013

Larry Allen Cris Carter Curley Culp Jonathan Ogden Bill Parcells Dave Robinson Warren Sapp

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Members of the Pro Football Hall of Fame

Quarterbacks

Pre-modern era

Baugh Clark Conzelman Driscoll Friedman Herber Luckman A. Parker

Modern era

Aikman Blanda Bradshaw L. Dawson Elway Favre Fouts Graham Griese Jurgensen J. Kelly Layne Marino Montana Moon Namath Stabler Starr Staubach Tarkenton Tittle Unitas Van Brocklin Warner Waterfield Young

Running backs

Pre-modern era

Battles Canadeo Dudley Grange Guyon Hinkle Lambeau Leemans McAfee McNally Nagurski Nevers Pollard Strong Thorpe Van Buren

Modern era

M. Allen Bettis J. Brown Campbell Csonka T. Davis Dickerson Dorsett Faulk Gifford Harris Hornung J. H. Johnson L. Kelly F. Little Martin Matson McElhenny Moore Motley Payton Perry Riggins B. Sanders Sayers Simpson E. Smith Jim Taylor T. Thomas Tomlinson Trippi Walker

Wide receivers / ends

Pre-modern era

Badgro Chamberlin Flaherty Halas Hewitt Hutson Millner

Modern era

Alworth Berry Biletnikoff T. Brown Carter Fears Harrison Hayes Hirsch Irvin Joiner Largent Lavelli Lofton Maynard McDonald Mitchell Monk Moss Owens Pihos Reed Rice Stallworth Swann C. Taylor Warfield

Tight ends

Casper Ditka Mackey Newsome C. Sanders Sharpe J. Smith Winslow

Offensive linemen

L. Allen B. Brown R. Brown Creekmur D. Dawson DeLamielleure Dierdorf Gatski Gregg Grimm Hannah Hickerson S. Jones W. Jones Kramer Langer L. Little Mack Matthews McCormack McDaniel Mix Munchak Muñoz Ogden Otto Pace J. Parker Ringo Roaf Shaw Shell Shields Slater St. Clair Stanfel Stephenson Tingelhoff Upshaw Webster Wright Yary Zimmerman

Pre-modern era two-way players

Edwards Fortmann Healey Hein Henry Hubbard Kiesling Kinard Lyman Michalske Musso Owen Stydahar Trafton Turner Wojciechowicz

Defensive linemen

Atkins Bethea Buchanan Culp W. Davis Dean Dent Doleman Donovan Eller Ford J. Greene Haley Hampton Humphrey D. Jones Jordan Kennedy Lilly Long Marchetti Nomellini Olsen Page Randle Robustelli Sapp Selmon B. Smith Stautner Strahan Ja. Taylor Weinmeister Ra. White Re. White Willis Youngblood

Linebackers

Bednarik Bo. Bell Brazile Brooks Buoniconti Butkus Carson Connor George K. Greene Ham Hanburger Hendricks Huff Jackson Lambert Lanier Lewis Nitschke Richter Robinson Schmidt Seau Singletary L. Taylor D. Thomas Tippett Urlacher Wilcox

Defensive backs

Adderley Barney Blount W. Brown Butler Christiansen Dawkins Easley Green Haynes Houston J. Johnson Krause Lane Lary LeBeau Lott Renfro D. Sanders E. Thomas Tunnell Wehrli Williams L. Wilson Wood Woodson

Placekickers and punters

Andersen Groza Guy Stenerud

Coaches

G. Allen P. Brown Chamberlin Conzelman Dungy Ewbank Flaherty Gibbs Gillman Grant Halas Lambeau Landry Levy Lombardi Madden Neale Noll Owen Parcells Shula Stram Walsh

Contributors

Beathard Be. Bell Bidwill Carr A. Davis DeBartolo Finks Halas Hunt J. Jones Lambeau T. Mara W. Mara Marshall Polian Ray Reeves A. Rooney D. Rooney Rozelle Sabol Schramm R. Wilson Wolf

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 38441172 LCC

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