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Belizean cuisine
Belizean cuisine
is an amalgamation of all ethnicities in the nation of Belize
Belize
and their respectively wide variety of foods. Breakfast consists of bread, flour tortillas, or fry jacks that are often homemade. Fry jacks are eaten with various cheeses, refried beans, various forms of eggs or cereal, along with milk, coffee, or tea. Midday meals vary, from lighter foods such as rice and beans, tamales, panades (fried meat pies), escabeche (onion soup), chimole (soup), stew chicken and garnaches (fried tortillas with beans, cheese, and sauce) to various constituted dinners featuring some type of rice and beans, meat and salad or coleslaw. In the rural areas meals may be more simplified than in the cities. The Maya use recado, corn or maize for most of their meals, and the Garifuna are fond of seafood, cassava (particularly made into cassava bread or Ereba) and vegetables. Belize
Belize
abounds with restaurants and fast food establishments selling fairly cheaply. Local fruits are quite common, but raw vegetables from the markets less so. Mealtime is a communion for families and schools and some businesses close at midday for lunch, reopening later in the afternoon.

Contents

1 Mestizo
Mestizo
and Maya 2 Kriols 3 Garifuna 4 Popular ingredients 5 Popular dishes 6 References

Mestizo
Mestizo
and Maya[edit]

Traditional Mestizo-Belizean foods.

Regular deli items originally from the Mestizo
Mestizo
culture that are now considered pan-Belizean include garnaches, fried corn tortilla smeared with beans and shredded cheese, tamales made from corn and chicken or its sister and panades which can be thought of as a fried corn patty with beans or seasoned shredded fish inside and topped with pickled onions. The most famous Maya dish is called Caldo. Tortillas, cooked on a comal and used to wrap other foods (meat, beans, etc.), were common and are perhaps the most well-known pre-Columbian Mesoamerican food. Tamales
Tamales
consist of corn dough, often containing a filling, that are wrapped in a corn husk and steam-cooked. Both atole and pozole were liquid based gruel-like dishes that were made by mixing ground maize (hominy) with water, but being the first much more dense used as a drinking source and the second one with complete big grains of maize incorporated into a chicken broth. Though these dishes could be consumed plain, other ingredients were added to diversify flavor, including, for example, honey, chiles, meat, seafood, cacao, wild onions, and salt. Several different varieties of beans were grown, including pinto, red, and black beans. Other cultivated crops, including fruits, contributed to the overall diet of the ancient Maya, including tomato, chile peppers, avocado, breadnut, guava, guanabana, papaya, pineapple, pumpkin, and sweet potato. Various herbs were grown and used, including vanilla, epazote, achiote (and the annatto seed), white cinnamon, hoja santa, avocado leaf, and garlic vine. Kriols[edit]

A traditional Belizean breakfast.

A traditional Belizean dinner.

Kriols in general eat a relatively balanced diet. The bile up (or boil up) is considered the cultural dish of the Belizean Kriols. It is combination boiled eggs, fish or pig tail, with a number of ground foods such as Cassava, Green Plantains, Yams, Sweet Potatoes, cocoa, and Tomato
Tomato
Sauce. In Belize, cassava is traditionally made into "bammy," a small fried cassava cake inherited from the Garifuna. The cassava root is grated, rinsed well, dried, salted, and pressed to form flat cakes about 4 inches in diameter and 1/2-inch thick. The cakes are lightly fried, then dipped in coconut milk and fried again. Bammies are usually served as a starchy side dish with breakfast, with fish dishes or alone as a snack. Cassava
Cassava
Pone is a traditional Belizean Kriol and pan- West Indian dessert recipe for a classic cassava flour cake sometimes made with coconuts and raisins. The Kriol fish seré is similar to a dish from the Garifuna culture, called hudut. There are two main types of hudut – one made with coconut milk, similar to the seré described above, but made with mashed half-ripe plantain. The other type does not use coconut milk and may best be compared to a spicy fish soup. Bos a pepa, a Belizean pepper sauce made from the hot habanero or the milder jalapeño, is sometimes added. Every single part of the coconut has some use: the dried husk for ornamental arts and for getting the fire going in a bar-b-cue; the water as a refreshing beverage or as a mixer with alcoholic drinks; the meat grated for its milk for uses as described above, or in other preparations, like the distinctive coconut-flavored taste of Kriol bread and bun. Dukunu is a dish made with sweetened starch (usually cornmeal but can also be sweet corn wrapped and boiled in aluminum foil or a banana leaf. Cahn Sham is ground or powdered sweetened parched corn. The dried grated coconut meat, after you mix with water and squeeze out its milk, provides the basis for many Belizean desserts. Like coconut pie and tarts, coconut crust (the grated coconut is sweetened with sugar and baked in a flour crust folded over like a patty), tablata, which is the grated coconut meat mixed with thin ginger slices, sugar and water, baked and cut into squares; there is also the version called cut-o-brute, which is made of chunks of coconut instead of the grated pieces; and then there is trifle, made with half green grated coconut, milk, flour, sugar, eggs, lemon essence, margarine and baking powder (similar to coconut cake); coconut fudge; and coconut ice cream. As noted above, fry jacks or Johnny cakes accompanied by fried beans with sausage or eggs make a common Belizean breakfast.[1] Both the jacks and Johnny cakes are made from flour, but while the jacks are flattened and fried, the Johnny cakes are round fluffy savory biscuits, often topped by butter or a slice of cheese. Among the main staples of a Kriol dinner are rice and beans with some type of meat and salad, whether potato, vegetable, or coleslaw, seafoods including fish, conch, lobster, some game meats including iguana, deer, peccary and gibnut; and ground foods such as cassava, potatoes, cocoa and plantains.[2] Fresh juice or water are typically served, occasionally replaced by soft drinks and alcoholic beverages (homemade wines made from berries, cashew, sorosi, grapefruit and rice are especially common). Typical desserts include sweets such as wangla and powderbun, cakes and pies, and potato pudding (pound). Usually to be seen on a breakfast table are specially made bread and bun (officially named after them), johnny-cakes and fry-cakes (also called fry jacks). In recent years Kriols have adopted foods from other groups as they have adopted theirs. Garifuna[edit]

A traditional Garifuna dinner.

There is a wide variety of Garifuna dishes, including the more commonly known ereba (cassava bread) made from grated cassava or manioc. This is done in an ancient and time-consuming process involving a long, snake-like woven basket (ruguma) which strains the cassava of its juice. It is then dried overnight and later sieved through flat rounded baskets (hibise) to form flour that is baked into pancakes on a large iron griddle. Ereba is fondly eaten with fish, hudutu (pounded plantains) or alone with gravy (lasusu). Others include: Bundiga (a plantain lasusu), Mazapan, and Bimacacule (sticky sweet rice). Popular ingredients[edit] There is a difference in the flavors of meats, such as turkey and chicken, from other countries because of differences in the diet of the animals being fed on local foodstuffs as opposed to imported grains. Belizean chickens in particular some allege compared to other chickens have an unusually rich flavor. Belizeans eat much more chicken and fish, than beef or pork.

Cassava Cohune Plantain Banana Habanero Chayote
Chayote
(locally known as "chocho") Allspice Ginger Callaloo Escallion Mangos Breadfruit Yam Garlic Black pepper Dried and salted cod
Dried and salted cod
(locally known as "salt fish") Salted beef Thyme Cow
Cow
feet Pig
Pig
tail Coconut
Coconut
milk Coconut Guava Soursop Passion fruit Sugar cane Ketchup Onion Brown sauce Mamey sapote
Mamey sapote
(locally known as "mahmee") Calabash Avocado
Avocado
(locally known as "pear") Black bean Kidney bean Roselle (locally known as "sorrel") Tamarind
Tamarind
(locally known as "tambran") Starfruit Golden apple Craboo Jackfruit Pineapple Malay apple Vinegar Recado Masa Maize Curry

Popular dishes[edit]

Ceviche Fry jack Conch
Conch
fritter Dukunu Hudutu Bile up Tamales Curry
Curry
chicken Rice and beans
Rice and beans
- rice stewed with beans and coconut milk[3] Garnaches Panades Salbutes Burritos Brown stew chicken Brown stew beef Caldo Escoveitch fish Conch
Conch
soup Callaloo
Callaloo
and saltfish Cabbage and saltfish Steamed fish Cowfoot

References[edit]

^ "Food of Belize
Belize
- Caribya!". belize-guide.info. Retrieved 2 August 2017.  ^ "Food & Drink in Belize". Frommer's. Retrieved 10 October 2017.  ^ " Belize
Belize
Cuisine
Cuisine
- The Famous Belize
Belize
Rice
Rice
and Beans and Other Favorites". Belize.com. Retrieved 2 August 2017. 

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