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A service star is a miniature bronze or silver five-pointed star316 inch (4.8 mm) in diameter that is authorized to be worn by members of the eight uniformed services of the United States on medals and ribbons to denote an additional award or service period.[1] The service star may also be referred to as a campaign star or battle star depending on which award is authorized the star and the manner in which the device is used for the award.[2]

Service stars, campaign stars, and battle stars are worn with one point of the star pointing up on the suspension ribbon of a medal or service ribbon. A silver star is worn instead of five bronze stars.[1] A service star is sometimes mistaken for a Bronze Star (Bronze Star Medal) or Silver Star (Silver Star Medal). The service star is also similar to the gold and silver 516 -inch stars that may be authorized to be worn on specific individual decorations of certain services to denote additional decorations.

Service stars

Expeditionary medals

Service stars are authorized for these United States expeditionary medals:

Enduring Freedom: Sep. 11, 2001 – to be determined (TBD)
Iraqi Freedom: Mar. 19, 2003 – Aug. 31, 2010
Nomad Shadow: Nov. 05, 2007 – TBD
New Dawn: Sep. 01, 2010 – Dec. 31, 2011
Inherent Resolve: Jun. 15, 2014 – TBD

Service medals

Service stars are authorized to denoted additional awards for these United States service medals:

For the National Defense Service Medal, the addition of bronze service stars to denote participation in four of the designated wartime conflicts would be shown as (the time span from the end of the Korean War era in 1954 to the beginning of the Global War on Terrorism era in 2001 is 47 years, so it is highly improbable that any individual qualified for all four National Defense Service Medals in each of four eras):[4]

Korean War
Vietnam Conflict
Gulf War
War on Terrorism
First award: any one of four conflicts

Service stars, campaign stars, and battle stars are worn with one point of the star pointing up on the suspension ribbon of a medal or service ribbon. A silver star is worn instead of five bronze stars.[1] A service star is sometimes mistaken for a Bronze Star (Bronze Star Medal) or Silver Star (Silver Star Medal). The service star is also similar to the gold and silver 516 -inch stars that may be authorized to be worn on specific individual decorations of certain services to denote additional decorations.

Service stars are authorized for these United States expeditionary medals:

Enduring Freedom: Sep. 11, 2001 – to be determined (TBD)
Iraqi Freedom: Mar. 19, 2003 – Aug. 31, 2010
Nomad Shadow: Nov. 05, 2007 – TBD
New Dawn: Sep. 01, 2010 – Dec. 31, 2011
Inherent Resolve: Jun. 15, 2014 – TBD

Service medals

Service stars are authorized to denoted additional awards for these United States service medals: