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The Info List - Baking Chocolate


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Baking
Baking
chocolate, also referred to as bitter chocolate,[1] cooking chocolate[2] and unsweetened chocolate,[3] is a type of chocolate that is prepared or manufactured for baking.[1] It is used as an ingredient in desserts and in baked goods. It is typically prepared in unsweetened,[1] bitter-sweet[2] semi-sweet[4] and sweet varieties.[5] It may be prepared with chocolate liquor or cocoa solids. Recipes that include unsweetened baking chocolate typically use a significant amount of sugar.[5] Bittersweet baking chocolate "must contain 35 percent chocolate liquor or higher."[5] Most baking chocolates have at least a 50% cocoa content, with the remaining content usually being "almost all sugar."[1] Sweet varieties may be referred to as "sweet baking chocolate" or "sweet chocolate."[6] Sweet baking chocolate contains more sugar than bittersweet[5] and semi-sweet varieties, and semi-sweet varieties contain more sugar than bittersweet varieties.[6] Sweet and semi-sweet baking chocolate is prepared with a chocolate liquor content between 15 and 35 percent.[5] Modern manufactured baking chocolate is typically formed from chocolate liquor into bars[1] and chocolate chips. Manufacturers may process the chocolate and then form it into bulk-sized ten-pound bars, which are then sold to confectioners and bakers.[2] Baking
Baking
chocolate may be of a lower quality compared to other types of chocolate, and may have part of the cocoa butter replaced with other fats that do not require tempering.[7] This type of baking chocolate may be easier to handle compared to those that have not had their cocoa butter content lowered.[7] Lower quality baking chocolate may not be as flavorful compared to higher-quality chocolate, and may have a different mouthfeel.[7]

Contents

1 Varieties 2 Manufacturers 3 See also 4 References 5 Bibliography

Varieties[edit] The table below denotes the four primary varieties of baking chocolate.

Type Content Sources

Unsweetened Contains no sugar, and contains 99% chocolate liquor or cocoa solids. [1][5][8]

Bittersweet Usually has less sugar and more chocolate liquor compared to semi-sweet varieties. [1][6][8][9]

Semi-sweet Has less sugar than sweet varieties. In Europe, a regulation exists stating that semi-sweet varieties must contain more sugar and less chocolate liquor compared to bittersweet varieties. No such regulation exists in the United States, and due to this, semi-sweet and bittersweet varieties can vary in sweetness and chocolate liquor content. In the U.S., bittersweet varieties are even sometimes sweeter than semi-sweet varieties. [1]

Sweet Has the most sugar. [5]

Manufacturers[edit] Manufacturers of baking chocolate include Baker's Chocolate,[10] Callebaut, Ghirardelli, Guittard, Lindt, Menier, Scharffen Berger and Valrhona,[2] among others. See also[edit]

Food portal

Types of chocolate

References[edit]

^ a b c d e f g h Mushet, C.; Sur La Table; Caruso, M. (2008). The Art and Soul of Baking. Andrews McMeel Publishing. pp. 39–40. ISBN 978-0-7407-7334-1.  ^ a b c d Risley, M. S. (2009). The Tante Marie's Cooking School Cookbook: More Than 250 Recipes for the Passionate Home Cook. Simon & Schuster. p. 370. ISBN 978-1-4391-4221-9.  ^ Patrick-Goudreau, C. (2007). The Joy of Vegan Baking: The Compassionate Cooks' Traditional Treats and Sinful Sweets. Fair Winds Press. p. 241. ISBN 978-1-61673-850-1.  ^ Gonzalez, E. (1998). The Art of Chocolate: Techniques and Recipes for Simply Spectacular Desserts and Confec Tions. Chronicle Books. p. 2. ISBN 978-0-8118-1811-7.  ^ a b c d e f g Better Homes and Gardens (2013). Better Homes and Gardens Baking: More than 350 Recipes Plus Tips and Techniques. Better Homes and Gardens Cooking. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. p. 18. ISBN 978-0-544-17781-9.  ^ a b c Phillips, S. (2008). Baking
Baking
9-1-1: Rescue from Recipe Disasters; Answers to Your Most Frequently Asked Baking
Baking
Questions; 40 Recipes for Every Baker. Touchstone. p. 162. ISBN 978-0-7432-5374-1.  ^ a b c Gisslen, W. (2012). Professional Baking. Wiley. p. 88. ISBN 978-1-118-08374-1.  ^ a b Holmberg, M.; Editors of Fine Cooking Magazine (2009). Absolutely Chocolate: Irresistible Excuses to Indulge. Taunton Press. p. 4. ISBN 978-1-60085-133-9. CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link) ^ Marcus, J. B. (2013). Culinary Nutrition: The Science and Practice of Healthy Cooking. Elsevier Science. p. 367. ISBN 978-0-12-391883-3.  ^ Goldstein, D.; Mintz, S.; Krondl, M.; Rath, E.; Mason, L.; Quinzio, G.; Heinzelmann, U. (2015). The Oxford Companion to Sugar and Sweets. Oxford University Press. p. 45. ISBN 978-0-19-931361-7. 

Bibliography[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Baking
Baking
chocolate.

Look up baker's chocolate in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

Sammarco, A. M. (2011). The Baker Chocolate
Chocolate
Company: A Sweet History. History Press. ISBN 978-1-61423-113-4.  136 pages.

v t e

Chocolate

Overview

Outline History (in Spain)

Theobroma

Theobroma

Theobroma
Theobroma
cacao Theobroma
Theobroma
grandiflorum Theobroma
Theobroma
bicolor

Components

Cocoa bean Cocoa butter Cocoa solids Chocolate
Chocolate
liquor

Drugs

Anandamide Caffeine Phenethylamine Theobromine Theophylline

Types

Baking Compound Couverture Dark Milk Modeling Organic White Raw

Products

Chocolate
Chocolate
bar

brands

Chocolate
Chocolate
beverages Chocolate
Chocolate
biscuit Chocolate
Chocolate
brownie Chocolate
Chocolate
cake Chocolate
Chocolate
chip Chocolate
Chocolate
chip cookie Chocolate
Chocolate
coins Chocolate
Chocolate
crackles Chocolate
Chocolate
gravy Chocolate
Chocolate
ice cream Chocolate
Chocolate
liqueur Chocolate
Chocolate
milk Chocolate
Chocolate
pudding Chocolate
Chocolate
spread Chocolate
Chocolate
syrup Chocolate
Chocolate
truffle Chocolate-covered foods Cioccolato di Modica Fudge Ganache Hot chocolate Mint chocolate Mocaccino Mole sauce Belgian chocolate Swiss chocolate

Processes

Aerated chocolate Broma process Chocolate
Chocolate
bloom Chocolate
Chocolate
temper meter Conche Dutch process Enrober Sugar crust

Industry

Big Chocolate Children in cocoa production Chocolaterie Chocolatier The Dark Side of Chocolate European Cocoa and Chocolate
Chocolate
Directive Ghana Cocoa Board Ghana production Harkin–Engel Protocol International Cocoa Organization Ivory Coast production Manufacturers (vertical) Nigeria production Philippine chocolate industry World Cocoa Foundation

Other topics

Chocoholic Chocolate
Chocolate
fountain Chocolate
Chocolate
museums Chocolatiers Health effects United States

.
Baking Chocolate
HOME
The Info List - Baking Chocolate


--- Advertisement ---



Baking
Baking
chocolate, also referred to as bitter chocolate,[1] cooking chocolate[2] and unsweetened chocolate,[3] is a type of chocolate that is prepared or manufactured for baking.[1] It is used as an ingredient in desserts and in baked goods. It is typically prepared in unsweetened,[1] bitter-sweet[2] semi-sweet[4] and sweet varieties.[5] It may be prepared with chocolate liquor or cocoa solids. Recipes that include unsweetened baking chocolate typically use a significant amount of sugar.[5] Bittersweet baking chocolate "must contain 35 percent chocolate liquor or higher."[5] Most baking chocolates have at least a 50% cocoa content, with the remaining content usually being "almost all sugar."[1] Sweet varieties may be referred to as "sweet baking chocolate" or "sweet chocolate."[6] Sweet baking chocolate contains more sugar than bittersweet[5] and semi-sweet varieties, and semi-sweet varieties contain more sugar than bittersweet varieties.[6] Sweet and semi-sweet baking chocolate is prepared with a chocolate liquor content between 15 and 35 percent.[5] Modern manufactured baking chocolate is typically formed from chocolate liquor into bars[1] and chocolate chips. Manufacturers may process the chocolate and then form it into bulk-sized ten-pound bars, which are then sold to confectioners and bakers.[2] Baking
Baking
chocolate may be of a lower quality compared to other types of chocolate, and may have part of the cocoa butter replaced with other fats that do not require tempering.[7] This type of baking chocolate may be easier to handle compared to those that have not had their cocoa butter content lowered.[7] Lower quality baking chocolate may not be as flavorful compared to higher-quality chocolate, and may have a different mouthfeel.[7]

Contents

1 Varieties 2 Manufacturers 3 See also 4 References 5 Bibliography

Varieties[edit] The table below denotes the four primary varieties of baking chocolate.

Type Content Sources

Unsweetened Contains no sugar, and contains 99% chocolate liquor or cocoa solids. [1][5][8]

Bittersweet Usually has less sugar and more chocolate liquor compared to semi-sweet varieties. [1][6][8][9]

Semi-sweet Has less sugar than sweet varieties. In Europe, a regulation exists stating that semi-sweet varieties must contain more sugar and less chocolate liquor compared to bittersweet varieties. No such regulation exists in the United States, and due to this, semi-sweet and bittersweet varieties can vary in sweetness and chocolate liquor content. In the U.S., bittersweet varieties are even sometimes sweeter than semi-sweet varieties. [1]

Sweet Has the most sugar. [5]

Manufacturers[edit] Manufacturers of baking chocolate include Baker's Chocolate,[10] Callebaut, Ghirardelli, Guittard, Lindt, Menier, Scharffen Berger and Valrhona,[2] among others. See also[edit]

Food portal

Types of chocolate

References[edit]

^ a b c d e f g h Mushet, C.; Sur La Table; Caruso, M. (2008). The Art and Soul of Baking. Andrews McMeel Publishing. pp. 39–40. ISBN 978-0-7407-7334-1.  ^ a b c d Risley, M. S. (2009). The Tante Marie's Cooking School Cookbook: More Than 250 Recipes for the Passionate Home Cook. Simon & Schuster. p. 370. ISBN 978-1-4391-4221-9.  ^ Patrick-Goudreau, C. (2007). The Joy of Vegan Baking: The Compassionate Cooks' Traditional Treats and Sinful Sweets. Fair Winds Press. p. 241. ISBN 978-1-61673-850-1.  ^ Gonzalez, E. (1998). The Art of Chocolate: Techniques and Recipes for Simply Spectacular Desserts and Confec Tions. Chronicle Books. p. 2. ISBN 978-0-8118-1811-7.  ^ a b c d e f g Better Homes and Gardens (2013). Better Homes and Gardens Baking: More than 350 Recipes Plus Tips and Techniques. Better Homes and Gardens Cooking. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. p. 18. ISBN 978-0-544-17781-9.  ^ a b c Phillips, S. (2008). Baking
Baking
9-1-1: Rescue from Recipe Disasters; Answers to Your Most Frequently Asked Baking
Baking
Questions; 40 Recipes for Every Baker. Touchstone. p. 162. ISBN 978-0-7432-5374-1.  ^ a b c Gisslen, W. (2012). Professional Baking. Wiley. p. 88. ISBN 978-1-118-08374-1.  ^ a b Holmberg, M.; Editors of Fine Cooking Magazine (2009). Absolutely Chocolate: Irresistible Excuses to Indulge. Taunton Press. p. 4. ISBN 978-1-60085-133-9. CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link) ^ Marcus, J. B. (2013). Culinary Nutrition: The Science and Practice of Healthy Cooking. Elsevier Science. p. 367. ISBN 978-0-12-391883-3.  ^ Goldstein, D.; Mintz, S.; Krondl, M.; Rath, E.; Mason, L.; Quinzio, G.; Heinzelmann, U. (2015). The Oxford Companion to Sugar and Sweets. Oxford University Press. p. 45. ISBN 978-0-19-931361-7. 

Bibliography[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Baking
Baking
chocolate.

Look up baker's chocolate in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

Sammarco, A. M. (2011). The Baker Chocolate
Chocolate
Company: A Sweet History. History Press. ISBN 978-1-61423-113-4.  136 pages.

v t e

Chocolate

Overview

Outline History (in Spain)

Theobroma

Theobroma

Theobroma
Theobroma
cacao Theobroma
Theobroma
grandiflorum Theobroma
Theobroma
bicolor

Components

Cocoa bean Cocoa butter Cocoa solids Chocolate
Chocolate
liquor

Drugs

Anandamide Caffeine Phenethylamine Theobromine Theophylline

Types

Baking Compound Couverture Dark Milk Modeling Organic White Raw

Products

Chocolate
Chocolate
bar

brands

Chocolate
Chocolate
beverages Chocolate
Chocolate
biscuit Chocolate
Chocolate
brownie Chocolate
Chocolate
cake Chocolate
Chocolate
chip Chocolate
Chocolate
chip cookie Chocolate
Chocolate
coins Chocolate
Chocolate
crackles Chocolate
Chocolate
gravy Chocolate
Chocolate
ice cream Chocolate
Chocolate
liqueur Chocolate
Chocolate
milk Chocolate
Chocolate
pudding Chocolate
Chocolate
spread Chocolate
Chocolate
syrup Chocolate
Chocolate
truffle Chocolate-covered foods Cioccolato di Modica Fudge Ganache Hot chocolate Mint chocolate Mocaccino Mole sauce Belgian chocolate Swiss chocolate

Processes

Aerated chocolate Broma process Chocolate
Chocolate
bloom Chocolate
Chocolate
temper meter Conche Dutch process Enrober Sugar crust

Industry

Big Chocolate Children in cocoa production Chocolaterie Chocolatier The Dark Side of Chocolate European Cocoa and Chocolate
Chocolate
Directive Ghana Cocoa Board Ghana production Harkin–Engel Protocol International Cocoa Organization Ivory Coast production Manufacturers (vertical) Nigeria production Philippine chocolate industry World Cocoa Foundation

Other topics

Chocoholic Chocolate
Chocolate
fountain Chocolate
Chocolate
museums Chocolatiers Health effects United States

.
Baking Chocolate
HOME
The Info List - Baking Chocolate


--- Advertisement ---



Baking
Baking
chocolate, also referred to as bitter chocolate,[1] cooking chocolate[2] and unsweetened chocolate,[3] is a type of chocolate that is prepared or manufactured for baking.[1] It is used as an ingredient in desserts and in baked goods. It is typically prepared in unsweetened,[1] bitter-sweet[2] semi-sweet[4] and sweet varieties.[5] It may be prepared with chocolate liquor or cocoa solids. Recipes that include unsweetened baking chocolate typically use a significant amount of sugar.[5] Bittersweet baking chocolate "must contain 35 percent chocolate liquor or higher."[5] Most baking chocolates have at least a 50% cocoa content, with the remaining content usually being "almost all sugar."[1] Sweet varieties may be referred to as "sweet baking chocolate" or "sweet chocolate."[6] Sweet baking chocolate contains more sugar than bittersweet[5] and semi-sweet varieties, and semi-sweet varieties contain more sugar than bittersweet varieties.[6] Sweet and semi-sweet baking chocolate is prepared with a chocolate liquor content between 15 and 35 percent.[5] Modern manufactured baking chocolate is typically formed from chocolate liquor into bars[1] and chocolate chips. Manufacturers may process the chocolate and then form it into bulk-sized ten-pound bars, which are then sold to confectioners and bakers.[2] Baking
Baking
chocolate may be of a lower quality compared to other types of chocolate, and may have part of the cocoa butter replaced with other fats that do not require tempering.[7] This type of baking chocolate may be easier to handle compared to those that have not had their cocoa butter content lowered.[7] Lower quality baking chocolate may not be as flavorful compared to higher-quality chocolate, and may have a different mouthfeel.[7]

Contents

1 Varieties 2 Manufacturers 3 See also 4 References 5 Bibliography

Varieties[edit] The table below denotes the four primary varieties of baking chocolate.

Type Content Sources

Unsweetened Contains no sugar, and contains 99% chocolate liquor or cocoa solids. [1][5][8]

Bittersweet Usually has less sugar and more chocolate liquor compared to semi-sweet varieties. [1][6][8][9]

Semi-sweet Has less sugar than sweet varieties. In Europe, a regulation exists stating that semi-sweet varieties must contain more sugar and less chocolate liquor compared to bittersweet varieties. No such regulation exists in the United States, and due to this, semi-sweet and bittersweet varieties can vary in sweetness and chocolate liquor content. In the U.S., bittersweet varieties are even sometimes sweeter than semi-sweet varieties. [1]

Sweet Has the most sugar. [5]

Manufacturers[edit] Manufacturers of baking chocolate include Baker's Chocolate,[10] Callebaut, Ghirardelli, Guittard, Lindt, Menier, Scharffen Berger and Valrhona,[2] among others. See also[edit]

Food portal

Types of chocolate

References[edit]

^ a b c d e f g h Mushet, C.; Sur La Table; Caruso, M. (2008). The Art and Soul of Baking. Andrews McMeel Publishing. pp. 39–40. ISBN 978-0-7407-7334-1.  ^ a b c d Risley, M. S. (2009). The Tante Marie's Cooking School Cookbook: More Than 250 Recipes for the Passionate Home Cook. Simon & Schuster. p. 370. ISBN 978-1-4391-4221-9.  ^ Patrick-Goudreau, C. (2007). The Joy of Vegan Baking: The Compassionate Cooks' Traditional Treats and Sinful Sweets. Fair Winds Press. p. 241. ISBN 978-1-61673-850-1.  ^ Gonzalez, E. (1998). The Art of Chocolate: Techniques and Recipes for Simply Spectacular Desserts and Confec Tions. Chronicle Books. p. 2. ISBN 978-0-8118-1811-7.  ^ a b c d e f g Better Homes and Gardens (2013). Better Homes and Gardens Baking: More than 350 Recipes Plus Tips and Techniques. Better Homes and Gardens Cooking. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. p. 18. ISBN 978-0-544-17781-9.  ^ a b c Phillips, S. (2008). Baking
Baking
9-1-1: Rescue from Recipe Disasters; Answers to Your Most Frequently Asked Baking
Baking
Questions; 40 Recipes for Every Baker. Touchstone. p. 162. ISBN 978-0-7432-5374-1.  ^ a b c Gisslen, W. (2012). Professional Baking. Wiley. p. 88. ISBN 978-1-118-08374-1.  ^ a b Holmberg, M.; Editors of Fine Cooking Magazine (2009). Absolutely Chocolate: Irresistible Excuses to Indulge. Taunton Press. p. 4. ISBN 978-1-60085-133-9. CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link) ^ Marcus, J. B. (2013). Culinary Nutrition: The Science and Practice of Healthy Cooking. Elsevier Science. p. 367. ISBN 978-0-12-391883-3.  ^ Goldstein, D.; Mintz, S.; Krondl, M.; Rath, E.; Mason, L.; Quinzio, G.; Heinzelmann, U. (2015). The Oxford Companion to Sugar and Sweets. Oxford University Press. p. 45. ISBN 978-0-19-931361-7. 

Bibliography[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Baking
Baking
chocolate.

Look up baker's chocolate in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

Sammarco, A. M. (2011). The Baker Chocolate
Chocolate
Company: A Sweet History. History Press. ISBN 978-1-61423-113-4.  136 pages.

v t e

Chocolate

Overview

Outline History (in Spain)

Theobroma

Theobroma

Theobroma
Theobroma
cacao Theobroma
Theobroma
grandiflorum Theobroma
Theobroma
bicolor

Components

Cocoa bean Cocoa butter Cocoa solids Chocolate
Chocolate
liquor

Drugs

Anandamide Caffeine Phenethylamine Theobromine Theophylline

Types

Baking Compound Couverture Dark Milk Modeling Organic White Raw

Products

Chocolate
Chocolate
bar

brands

Chocolate
Chocolate
beverages Chocolate
Chocolate
biscuit Chocolate
Chocolate
brownie Chocolate
Chocolate
cake Chocolate
Chocolate
chip Chocolate
Chocolate
chip cookie Chocolate
Chocolate
coins Chocolate
Chocolate
crackles Chocolate
Chocolate
gravy Chocolate
Chocolate
ice cream Chocolate
Chocolate
liqueur Chocolate
Chocolate
milk Chocolate
Chocolate
pudding Chocolate
Chocolate
spread Chocolate
Chocolate
syrup Chocolate
Chocolate
truffle Chocolate-covered foods Cioccolato di Modica Fudge Ganache Hot chocolate Mint chocolate Mocaccino Mole sauce Belgian chocolate Swiss chocolate

Processes

Aerated chocolate Broma process Chocolate
Chocolate
bloom Chocolate
Chocolate
temper meter Conche Dutch process Enrober Sugar crust

Industry

Big Chocolate Children in cocoa production Chocolaterie Chocolatier The Dark Side of Chocolate European Cocoa and Chocolate
Chocolate
Directive Ghana Cocoa Board Ghana production Harkin–Engel Protocol International Cocoa Organization Ivory Coast production Manufacturers (vertical) Nigeria production Philippine chocolate industry World Cocoa Foundation

Other topics

Chocoholic Chocolate
Chocolate
fountain Chocolate
Chocolate
museums Chocolatiers Health effects United States

.
l> Baking Chocolate
HOME
The Info List - Baking Chocolate


--- Advertisement ---



Baking
Baking
chocolate, also referred to as bitter chocolate,[1] cooking chocolate[2] and unsweetened chocolate,[3] is a type of chocolate that is prepared or manufactured for baking.[1] It is used as an ingredient in desserts and in baked goods. It is typically prepared in unsweetened,[1] bitter-sweet[2] semi-sweet[4] and sweet varieties.[5] It may be prepared with chocolate liquor or cocoa solids. Recipes that include unsweetened baking chocolate typically use a significant amount of sugar.[5] Bittersweet baking chocolate "must contain 35 percent chocolate liquor or higher."[5] Most baking chocolates have at least a 50% cocoa content, with the remaining content usually being "almost all sugar."[1] Sweet varieties may be referred to as "sweet baking chocolate" or "sweet chocolate."[6] Sweet baking chocolate contains more sugar than bittersweet[5] and semi-sweet varieties, and semi-sweet varieties contain more sugar than bittersweet varieties.[6] Sweet and semi-sweet baking chocolate is prepared with a chocolate liquor content between 15 and 35 percent.[5] Modern manufactured baking chocolate is typically formed from chocolate liquor into bars[1] and chocolate chips. Manufacturers may process the chocolate and then form it into bulk-sized ten-pound bars, which are then sold to confectioners and bakers.[2] Baking
Baking
chocolate may be of a lower quality compared to other types of chocolate, and may have part of the cocoa butter replaced with other fats that do not require tempering.[7] This type of baking chocolate may be easier to handle compared to those that have not had their cocoa butter content lowered.[7] Lower quality baking chocolate may not be as flavorful compared to higher-quality chocolate, and may have a different mouthfeel.[7]

Contents

1 Varieties 2 Manufacturers 3 See also 4 References 5 Bibliography

Varieties[edit] The table below denotes the four primary varieties of baking chocolate.

Type Content Sources

Unsweetened Contains no sugar, and contains 99% chocolate liquor or cocoa solids. [1][5][8]

Bittersweet Usually has less sugar and more chocolate liquor compared to semi-sweet varieties. [1][6][8][9]

Semi-sweet Has less sugar than sweet varieties. In Europe, a regulation exists stating that semi-sweet varieties must contain more sugar and less chocolate liquor compared to bittersweet varieties. No such regulation exists in the United States, and due to this, semi-sweet and bittersweet varieties can vary in sweetness and chocolate liquor content. In the U.S., bittersweet varieties are even sometimes sweeter than semi-sweet varieties. [1]

Sweet Has the most sugar. [5]

Manufacturers[edit] Manufacturers of baking chocolate include Baker's Chocolate,[10] Callebaut, Ghirardelli, Guittard, Lindt, Menier, Scharffen Berger and Valrhona,[2] among others. See also[edit]

Food portal

Types of chocolate

References[edit]

^ a b c d e f g h Mushet, C.; Sur La Table; Caruso, M. (2008). The Art and Soul of Baking. Andrews McMeel Publishing. pp. 39–40. ISBN 978-0-7407-7334-1.  ^ a b c d Risley, M. S. (2009). The Tante Marie's Cooking School Cookbook: More Than 250 Recipes for the Passionate Home Cook. Simon & Schuster. p. 370. ISBN 978-1-4391-4221-9.  ^ Patrick-Goudreau, C. (2007). The Joy of Vegan Baking: The Compassionate Cooks' Traditional Treats and Sinful Sweets. Fair Winds Press. p. 241. ISBN 978-1-61673-850-1.  ^ Gonzalez, E. (1998). The Art of Chocolate: Techniques and Recipes for Simply Spectacular Desserts and Confec Tions. Chronicle Books. p. 2. ISBN 978-0-8118-1811-7.  ^ a b c d e f g Better Homes and Gardens (2013). Better Homes and Gardens Baking: More than 350 Recipes Plus Tips and Techniques. Better Homes and Gardens Cooking. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. p. 18. ISBN 978-0-544-17781-9.  ^ a b c Phillips, S. (2008). Baking
Baking
9-1-1: Rescue from Recipe Disasters; Answers to Your Most Frequently Asked Baking
Baking
Questions; 40 Recipes for Every Baker. Touchstone. p. 162. ISBN 978-0-7432-5374-1.  ^ a b c Gisslen, W. (2012). Professional Baking. Wiley. p. 88. ISBN 978-1-118-08374-1.  ^ a b Holmberg, M.; Editors of Fine Cooking Magazine (2009). Absolutely Chocolate: Irresistible Excuses to Indulge. Taunton Press. p. 4. ISBN 978-1-60085-133-9. CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link) ^ Marcus, J. B. (2013). Culinary Nutrition: The Science and Practice of Healthy Cooking. Elsevier Science. p. 367. ISBN 978-0-12-391883-3.  ^ Goldstein, D.; Mintz, S.; Krondl, M.; Rath, E.; Mason, L.; Quinzio, G.; Heinzelmann, U. (2015). The Oxford Companion to Sugar and Sweets. Oxford University Press. p. 45. ISBN 978-0-19-931361-7. 

Bibliography[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Baking
Baking
chocolate.

Look up baker's chocolate in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

Sammarco, A. M. (2011). The Baker Chocolate
Chocolate
Company: A Sweet History. History Press. ISBN 978-1-61423-113-4.  136 pages.

v t e

Chocolate

Overview

Outline History (in Spain)

Theobroma

Theobroma

Theobroma
Theobroma
cacao Theobroma
Theobroma
grandiflorum Theobroma
Theobroma
bicolor

Components

Cocoa bean Cocoa butter Cocoa solids Chocolate
Chocolate
liquor

Drugs

Anandamide Caffeine Phenethylamine Theobromine Theophylline

Types

Baking Compound Couverture Dark Milk Modeling Organic White Raw

Products

Chocolate
Chocolate
bar

brands

Chocolate
Chocolate
beverages Chocolate
Chocolate
biscuit Chocolate
Chocolate
brownie Chocolate
Chocolate
cake Chocolate
Chocolate
chip Chocolate
Chocolate
chip cookie Chocolate
Chocolate
coins Chocolate
Chocolate
crackles Chocolate
Chocolate
gravy Chocolate
Chocolate
ice cream Chocolate
Chocolate
liqueur Chocolate
Chocolate
milk Chocolate
Chocolate
pudding Chocolate
Chocolate
spread Chocolate
Chocolate
syrup Chocolate
Chocolate
truffle Chocolate-covered foods Cioccolato di Modica Fudge Ganache Hot chocolate Mint chocolate Mocaccino Mole sauce Belgian chocolate Swiss chocolate

Processes

Aerated chocolate Broma process Chocolate
Chocolate
bloom Chocolate
Chocolate
temper meter Conche Dutch process Enrober Sugar crust

Industry

Big Chocolate Children in cocoa production Chocolaterie Chocolatier The Dark Side of Chocolate European Cocoa and Chocolate
Chocolate
Directive Ghana Cocoa Board Ghana production Harkin–Engel Protocol International Cocoa Organization Ivory Coast production Manufacturers (vertical) Nigeria production Philippine chocolate industry World Cocoa Foundation

Other topics

Chocoholic Chocolate
Chocolate
fountain Chocolate
Chocolate
museums Chocolatiers Health effects United States

.

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