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The Badami
Badami
Chalukya
Chalukya
architecture was a temple building idiom that evolved in the 5th – 8th centuries in the Malaprabha
Malaprabha
river basin, in present-day Bagalkot district
Bagalkot district
of Karnataka
Karnataka
state, under the Chalukya dynasty. This style is sometimes called the Vesara
Vesara
style and Chalukya style, a term that also includes the much later Western Chalukya architecture of the 11th and 12th centuries. Early Chalukya architecture, used by George Michell and others, equates to Badami Chalukya. The earliest Badami
Badami
Chalukya
Chalukya
temples date back to around 450 A.D. in Aihole
Aihole
when the Badami Chalukyas
Badami Chalukyas
were vassals of the Kadambas of Banavasi. According to historian K.V. Sounder Rajan, the Badami Chalukyas contribution to temple building matched their valor and their achievements in battle. About 450 CE, the Early Chalukya
Chalukya
style originated in Aihole
Aihole
and was perfected in Badami
Badami
and Pattadakal.[1] The unknown architects and artists experimented with different styles, blended the Nagara and Dravidian styles.[2] Their style includes two types of monuments: rock cut halls or "cave temples", and "structural" temples, built above ground.

Contents

1 Badami
Badami
cave temples

1.1 Important Badami
Badami
Chalukya
Chalukya
temples

2 References 3 Notes 4 External links

Badami
Badami
cave temples[edit]

Cave temple at Badami
Badami
Karnataka

Bhutanatha temple complex

Badami
Badami
cave temples have rock cut halls with three basic features: pillared veranda, columned hall and a sanctum cut out deep into rock. Early experiments in rock cut halls were attempted in Aihole
Aihole
where they built three cave temples, one each in Vedic, Buddhist
Buddhist
and Jaina styles. Later they refined their style and cut out four marvellous cave temples at Badami. One noteworthy feature of these cave temples is the running frieze of Ganas in various amusing postures caved in relief on each plinth. The outside verandas of the cave temples are rather plain, but the inner hall contains rich and prolific sculptural symbolism. Art critic Dr. M. Sheshadri wrote of the Chalukya
Chalukya
art that they cut rock like Titans but finished like jewellers. Critic Zimmer wrote that the Chalukya
Chalukya
cave temples are a fine balance of versatility and restrain. The finest structural temples are located in Pattadakal. Of the ten temples in Pattadakal, six are in Dravidian style and four in Rekhanagara style. The Virupaksha temple in many ways holds resemblance to the Kailasanatha temple in Kanchipuram which came into existence a few years earlier. This is a fully inclusive temple, it has a central structure, nandi pavilion in front and has a walled enclosure that is entered by a gateway. The main sanctum has a Pradakshinapatha and mantapa. The mantapa is pillared and has perforated windows (pierced window screens). The external wall surface is divided by pilasters into well-spaced ornamental niches filled with either sculptures or perforated windows. Art critic Percy Brown says about the sculptures that they flow into the architecture in a continuous stream. It is said that the Virupaskha temple is one of those monuments where the spirit of the men who built it, still lives. Many centuries later, the serene art of the Badami
Badami
Chalukya
Chalukya
reappeared in the pillared architecture of the Vijayanagar Empire. Their caves include finely engraved sculptures of Harihara, Trivikrama, Mahisa Mardhini, Tandavamurthi, Paravasudeva, Nataraja, Varaha, Gomateshvara and others. Plenty of animal and foliage motifs are also included. Some important sculptors of their time were Gundan Anivaritachari, Revadi Ovajja and Narasobba. Important Badami
Badami
Chalukya
Chalukya
temples[edit]

Virupaksha temple at Pattadakal

Ravana Phadi cave, Aihole

Pattadakal

Virupaksha Temple Sangameswarar Temple Kashivisvanatha Temple (Rashtrakuta) Mallikarjuna Temple Galganatha Temple Kadasiddeshvara Temple Jambulinga Temple Jain
Jain
Narayana Temple (Rashtrakuta) Papanatha Temple Museum of the Plains and Sculpture gallery Naganatha Temple Chandrashekara Mahakuteshwara Temple Sun Temple

Jain
Jain
tirthankara Parshvanath, cave No. 4, Badami
Badami
cave temples

Aihole

Lad Khan Temple Huchiappayyagudi Temple Huchiappayya math Durga Temple Meguti Jain
Jain
Temple Ravanaphadi Temple Gowda Temple Museum & Art Gallery Suryanarayana Temple

Badami

Cave 1 (Shiva) Cave 2 (Vishnu as Trivikrama
Trivikrama
or Vamana, Varaha
Varaha
and Krishna) Cave 3 (Vishnu as Narasimha, Varaha, Harihara
Harihara
and Trivikrama.) Cave 4 ( Jain
Jain
Tirthankara
Tirthankara
Parsvanatha) Bhutanatha group of temples ( Badami
Badami
and Kalyani Chalukya)

Gerusoppa

Vardhamanaswamy Temple

Sanduru

Parvati temple

Alampur, Andhra Pradesh

Navabrahma temples Kudavelly Sangameshwara Temple

References[edit]

^ "Echoes from Chalukya
Chalukya
caves". Retrieved 2009-04-01.  ^ "Architecture, The Chalukyan magnificence". Archived from the original on 10 May 2009. Retrieved 2009-04-01. 

Notes[edit]

Nilakanta Sastri, K.A. (1955). A History of South India, From Prehistoric times to fall of Vijayanagar, OUP, New Delhi (Reprinted 2002). Dr. Suryanath U. Kamat (2001). Concise History of Karnataka, MCC, Bangalore
Bangalore
(Reprinted 2002). History Of Karnataka, Mr. Arthikaje © 1998-00 OurKarnataka.com

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Architecture of the Chalukya Empire.

Official site of Bagalkot District Karnataka
Karnataka
Tourism Guide Karnataka
Karnataka
Hotels Tourism of India Temples of Karnataka, Dr. Jyotsna Kamat

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Architecture of Karnataka
Karnataka
(345 to present)

0345 to 0525: Kadamba architecture
Kadamba architecture
– synthesis of several schools 0350 to 0550: Dravidian architecture
Dravidian architecture
(Western Ganga Dynasty) 0543 to 0753: Badami
Badami
Chalukya
Chalukya
architecture or the Vesara
Vesara
style 0753 to 0973: Dravidian & Rekhanagara architecture of Rashtrakutas 1000 to 1200: Western Chalukya
Chalukya
architecture ( Gadag
Gadag
style of architecture) 1100 to 1400: Hoysala architecture
Hoysala architecture
of the Hoysala Empire 1336 to 1648: Vijayanagara architecture
Vijayanagara architecture
of the Vijayanagar Empire 1490 to 1686: Islamic
Islamic
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Keladi Nayaka
architecture of the Nayaka kingdoms 1399 to 1947: Architecture of Kingdom of Mysore
Kingdom of Mysore
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Indo-Sarcenic
and Muslim
Muslim
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Sikh
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Bidar
& Bangalore 1933 to 1956: Neo-Gothic church architecture 1947 to present: Neo-Dravidian architecture 1953 to present: Buddhist
Buddhist
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Tibetan Culture
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