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The Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA) is a trade group representing the Australian recording industry which was established in 1983 by six major record companies, EMI, Festival, CBS, RCA, WEA and Universal replacing the Association of Australian Record Manufacturers (AARM) which was formed in 1956.[1] It oversees the collection, administration and distribution of music licenses and royalties. The association has more than 100 members, including small labels typically run by one to five people, medium size organisations and very large companies with international affiliates. ARIA is administered by a Board of Directors comprising senior executives from record companies, both large and small. As of October 2010, the directors were Denis Handlin (chair, CEO of Sony Music), George Ash (Universal Music), Mark Poston (EMI), Sebastian Chase (MGM Distribution), David Vodica (Rubber Records/Music) and Tony Harlow (WAR).[2]

Contents

1 History 2 ARIA Charts 3 ARIA Awards

3.1 ARIA No. 1 Chart Awards 3.2 ARIA Music Awards

4 Criticisms 5 See also 6 References 7 External links

History[edit] In 1956, the Association of Australian Record Manufacturers (AARM) was formed by Australia's major record companies.[1] It was replaced in 1983 by the Australian Recording Industry Association, which was established by the six major record companies operating in Australia, EMI
EMI
(now part of Universal Music Group), Festival Records, CBS (now known as Sony Music), RCA (now part of Sony Music), WEA (now known as Warner Music Group) and Polygram
Polygram
(now known as Universal). It later included smaller record companies representing independent acts/labels and has over 100 members. By 1997, the six major labels provided 90% of all recordings made in Australia.[1] ARIA is administered by a Board of Directors comprising senior executives from record companies, both large and small. As of October 2010, the directors were Denis Handlin (chair, CEO of Sony Music), George Ash (Universal Music), Mark Poston (EMI), Sebastian Chase (MGM Distribution), David Vodica (Rubber Records/Music) and Tony Harlow (WAR).[2] Australian TV pop music show Countdown presented its own annual awards ceremony, Countdown Music and Video Awards, which was co-produced by Carolyn James (a.k.a. Carolyn Bailey) during 1981–1984 in collaboration with ARIA.[3][4][5] ARIA provided peer voting for some awards, while Countdown provided coupons in the related Countdown Magazine for viewers to vote for populist awards.[6] At the 1985 Countdown awards ceremony, held on 14 April 1986, fans of INXS
INXS
and Uncanny X-Men scuffled during the broadcast and as a result ARIA decided to hold their own awards.[5] Since 2 March 1987, ARIA administered its own entirely peer-voted ARIA Music Awards,[7] to "recognise excellence and innovation in all genres of Australian music" with an annual ceremony.[8][9] Initially included in the same awards ceremonies, it established the ARIA Hall of Fame
ARIA Hall of Fame
in 1988 and has held separate annual ceremonies since 2005. The ARIA Hall of Fame "honours Australian musicians' achievements [that] have had a significant impact in Australia or around the world".[10] In February 2004, the Australian Record Industry Association (ARIA) announced its own legal action against Kazaa, alleging massive copyright breaches. The trial began on 29 November 2004. On 6 February 2005, the homes of two Sharman Networks executives and the offices of Sharman Networks in Australia were raided under a court order by ARIA to gather evidence for the trial. In 2006, ARIA formed sponsorship deals with Motorola
Motorola
and Nova and changed the appearance and conduct of the charting. Motorola
Motorola
took naming-rights sponsorship seeing the charts referred to in the media as the Motorola
Motorola
ARIA Charts. ARIA, have commented that as part of the same marketing printed charts would be reintroduced into media retailing shops and their website would be redesigned. As part of the deal Nova began broadcasting the charted singles in reverse order on a Sunday afternoon show before it was released on the ARIA charts website. ARIA Charts[edit] Main article: ARIA Charts The ARIA Charts
ARIA Charts
is the main Australian music sales charts, issued weekly by the Australian Recording Industry Association. The charts are a record of the highest selling singles and albums in various genres. All charts are compiled from data of both physical and digital sales from retailers in Australia.[11] ARIA Awards[edit] ARIA No. 1 Chart Awards[edit] The ARIA No. 1 Chart Awards were established in 2002 to recognise Australian recording artists, who reached number one on the ARIA albums, singles and music DVDs charts.[12] ARIA Music Awards[edit] Main article: ARIA Music Awards The ARIA Music Awards
ARIA Music Awards
is an annual series of awards nights celebrating the Australian music industry. The event has been held annually since 1987; it encompasses the general genre-specific and popular awards known as the ARIA Awards, as well as the Fine Arts Awards and Artisan Awards (held separately from 2004), Lifetime Achievement Awards and the ARIA Hall of Fame
ARIA Hall of Fame
(held separately from 2005 to 2010 but returned to the general ceremony in 2011). Criticisms[edit] Like most recording industry associations, ARIA has been criticised for fighting copyright infringement matters aggressively, although in Australia this has largely taken the form of aggressive advertising campaigns particularly in cinemas directly preceding movies. This criticism is stauncher in Australia due to the absence of an equivalent Digital Millennium Copyright Act
Digital Millennium Copyright Act
or state crimes acts which clearly establish copyright infringement as a crime.[citation needed] In February 2004, the Australian Record Industry Association (ARIA) took legal action against Kazaa, alleging massive copyright breaches. The trial began on 29 November 2004. On 6 February 2005, the homes of two Sharman Networks executives and the offices of Sharman Networks in Australia were raided under a court order by ARIA to gather evidence for the trial.[citation needed] The ARIA charts have also been criticised as an easily manipulated market tool abused by aggressively marketed pop acts. "Gold" and "Platinum" ARIA awards are based on units shipped to retail outlets, not on how many of those units are sold to customers. A lukewarm album or single release can achieve Gold or Platinum status by flooding the market with copies, and if 99% are returned to the manufacturer that in no way affects the status of the award.[citation needed] ARIA has been criticised by former Australian Idol
Australian Idol
judge and record producer Ian Dickson for a perceived intolerance of Australian Idol contestants, and a lack of nomination in the ARIA Awards.[13] See also[edit]

Music of Australia
Music of Australia
portal

Music of Australia

References[edit]

^ a b c Siobhan O'Connor, ed. (1997) [1990]. The book of Australia : almanac 1997–98. Balmain, NSW: Ken Fin: Watermark Press for Social Club Books. p. 515. ISBN 1-875973-71-0.  ^ a b "Who We Are". Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). Archived from the original on 25 October 2010. Retrieved 28 October 2010.  ^ "WAM Scene". Western Australia Music Industry Association Incorporated. 2005. Archived from the original on 20 July 2008. Retrieved 2008-12-10.  ^ "The Countdown Story". Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC). 2006. Archived from the original on 25 July 2008. Retrieved 2008-12-10.  ^ a b "The quirks that made it work". The Sydney Morning Herald. 2006-08-05. Retrieved 2008-12-10.  ^ "Countdown Magazine" (PDF). Australian Broadcasting Corporation. January 1986. Retrieved 2009-02-07.  ^ Knox, David (2007-10-17). "ARIAs hall of infamy". TV Tonight. Archived from the original on 20 October 2008. Retrieved 2008-12-03.  ^ "ARIA Awards". Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). Archived from the original on 5 March 2009. Retrieved 2009-03-21.  ^ "ARIA Awards 2008 : Home". Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). Archived from the original on 5 March 2009. Retrieved 2009-03-21.  ^ " ARIA Hall of Fame
ARIA Hall of Fame
- Home page". Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). Archived from the original on 27 February 2009. Retrieved 2009-03-21.  ^ "How are the ARIA Charts
ARIA Charts
prepared each week?". Australian Recording Industry Association. Archived from the original on 26 January 2014. Retrieved 30 December 2013.  ^ "ARIA No. 1 Chart Awards (1 July 2005)". Australian Recording Industry Association. Archived from the original on 15 February 2014. Retrieved 30 December 2013.  ^ Zuel, Bernard (2007-09-06). "Scarlet letters". The Sydney Morning Herald. 

External links[edit]

ARIA Home Page

v t e

ARIA Charts

Official record chart keeping in Australia Go-Set
Go-Set
Top 40 (1966–1974) Kent Music Report
Kent Music Report
(1974–1998; 1940–2007 retrospect) ARIA Charts
ARIA Charts
(1988–present)

Albums

Top 50 albums (Number-ones)

By decade

1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s

By year

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

Top 25 albums (End-of-year/decade charts)

Year

1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017

Decade

1980s 2000s

Genre charts (Number-ones)

Country

2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

Urban

2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

Other charts (Number-ones)

Digital

2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

Artists who have reached number-one Best selling albums

Singles

Top 50 singles (Number-ones)

By decade

1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s

By year

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

Top 25 singles (End-of-year/decade charts)

Year

1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017

Decade

1980s 2000s

Genre charts (Number-ones)

Club

2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

Dance

2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

Urban

2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

Other charts (Number-ones)

Digital

2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

Streaming

2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

Artists who have reached number-one Best selling singles

Chart achievements and milestones

v t e

Music of Australia

Genres

Classical Country Folk Immigrant Indigenous Hip-hop Jazz Reggae Rock

Aboriginal Indie Metal Pub Punk Thrash

Ska

Organisations

AIR APRA AMCOS ARIA CMAA

Awards

AIR Awards ARIA Music Awards Australian Music Prize CMAA Country Music Awards of Australia Deadly Awards Gold Coast Music Awards J Awards National Indigenous Music Awards Perth Dance Music Awards WAMi Awards Australian pop music awards

Charts

AIR Charts ARIA Charts Kent Music Report The Rock Across Australia Triple J
Triple J
Hottest 100

Festivals

Current

Bluesfest Byron Bay Defqon.1 Festival Falls Festival Groovin' the Moo Mildura Country Music Festival National Folk Festival Splendour in the Grass Stereosonic
Stereosonic
(2016 hiatus) Tamworth Country Music Festival WOMADelaide

Former

Big Day Out
Big Day Out
(1992-1997; 1999-2014) Break the Ice (2012-2014) Creamfields Australia
Creamfields Australia
(2010-2012) Future Music Festival
Future Music Festival
(2006-2015) Homebake
Homebake
(1996; 1998-2012) Raggamuffin Music Festival
Raggamuffin Music Festival
(2008-2011) Soundwave (2004-2015) Summadayze
Summadayze
(2003-2013)

Media

3RRR 4ZZZ Channel V Australia CMC Community radio Countdown Go-Set Max MTV MTV Classic rage Rock Arena Rolling Stone Australia Triple J triple j tv Video Hits

National anthem

"Advance Australia Fair"

Cities and regions

Adelaide Brisbane Canberra Melbourne Perth Sydney

See also: Timeline Portal

v t e

Record charts (List of)

Africa

South Africa

Asia

China Israel India Japan Lebanon Malaysia Pakistan Philippines South Korea Taiwan

Europe

Austria Belgium Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany Greece Hungary Ireland Italy Netherlands

Dutch Top 40 MegaCharts

Norway Poland Portugal Romania

Romanian Top 100 Airplay 100

Russia Slovakia Slovenia Spain Sweden Switzerland Turkey Ukraine United Kingdom

North America

Canada Honduras Mexico

AMPROFON Monitor Latino

United States

Oceania

Australia New Zealand

South America

Argentina Brazil Colomb

.