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The Australian Olympic Committee
Australian Olympic Committee
(AOC) is the National Olympic Committee responsible for developing, promoting and protecting the Olympic Movement in Australia. The AOC has the exclusive responsibility for the representation of Australia
Australia
at the Olympic Games (Summer and Winter), the Youth Olympic Games and at Regional Games patronised by the International Olympic Committee
International Olympic Committee
(IOC). All National Olympic Committees (currently 205 worldwide) are constituents of the International Olympic Committee.

Contents

1 Organisation 2 History 3 Administration

3.1 Presidents/Chair 3.2 Honorary Secretary/Secretary-General 3.3 International Olympic Committee
International Olympic Committee
members

4 Funding 5 International Olympic Committee
International Olympic Committee
members 6 See also 7 References 8 Bibliography 9 External links

Organisation[edit] The Australian Olympic Committee
Australian Olympic Committee
is composed of 35 member National Sport Federations representing each sport on the Olympic program for the Summer Olympic Games
Summer Olympic Games
and the Olympic Winter Games. The AOC is represented in each State and Territory in Australia
Australia
through State Olympic Councils who are responsible for promoting the Olympic ideals and values and raising funds for the Australian Olympic Teams. The AOC is responsible for selecting the Team that represents Australia
Australia
at the Olympic Games, after considering nominations by each National Sport Federation. The AOC Executive comprises the President since 1990 John Coates, Vice-Presidents Helen Brownlee and Ian Chesterman, chief executive officer Matt Carroll and members Matt Allen, Mark Arbib, Craig Carracher, Kitty Chiller, Evelyn Halls, Steve Hooker, Nicole Livingstone and Michael Murphy.[1] John Coates and James Tomkins are current IOC members. John Coates has been a member since 2001, served on the Executive Board from 2009 – 2013 and was elected Vice-president in 2013. James Tomkins has been a member since 2013.[1] Patron in Chief is the Governor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia, General Sir Peter Cosgrove, and Patron is the Prime Minister of Australia, currently Malcolm Turnbull.[1] The AOC has an Athletes' Commission, responsible for advising the AOC Executive on all matters pertaining to the Olympic Movement from an athletes perspective. The Commission is made up of 11 members, all Olympians who have been elected by their Olympic teammates during a Summer and Winter Olympic Games. The Chairperson is Steve Hooker (Athletics) who also has a seat on the AOC Executive. Deputy Chairperson is Kim Brennan
Kim Brennan
(Rowing) and remaining members are Alana Boyd (Athletics), Cate Campbell
Cate Campbell
(Swimming), Ramone Cooper (Freestyle Skiing), Jamie Dwyer
Jamie Dwyer
(Hockey), Jessica Fox (Canoe/Kayak), Lydia Lassila (Freestyle Skiing, Aerials), James Tomkins (Rowing), Ken Wallace (Canoe/Kayak) and Shelley Watts (Boxing).[2] History[edit]

Former logo (1953–2015).

Australia
Australia
was represented by Edwin Flack
Edwin Flack
at the 1896 Athens Olympics. Flack won two gold medals. In 1905, Richard Coombes became Australia's first International Olympic Committee
International Olympic Committee
member when he replaced New Zealander Leonard Cuff who represented Australasia. In 1914, the Olympic Federation of Australia
Australia
and New Zealand (OFANZ) was established. In 1920, New Zealand leaves the OFANZ and the Australian Olympic Council was established with James Taylor being its first president. In 1923, Australian Olympic Council changed its name to the Australian Olympic Federation (AOF). In 1990, the AOF rescinded its constitution and became the Australian Olympic Committee
Australian Olympic Committee
(AOC).[3] Australia
Australia
has hosted two Summer Olympics: 1956 Melbourne Olympics
1956 Melbourne Olympics
and 2000 Sydney
Sydney
Olympics.[3] Brisbane, Queensland
Queensland
made at bid for the 1992 Summer Olympics
Summer Olympics
and Melbourne, Australia
Australia
made a bid for the 1996 Summer Olympics.[4] Administration[edit] Presidents/Chair[edit]

James Taylor (1920–1944) Sir Harold Alderson (1944–1973) Sir Edgar Tanner (1973–1977) Sydney
Sydney
Grange (1977–1985) Kevan Gosper
Kevan Gosper
(1985–1990) John Coates (1990–present)

[3][5] Honorary Secretary/Secretary-General[edit]

George Shand (acting) (1920) Oswald G H Merrett (1921–1924) James S W Eve (1924–1947) Sir Edgar Tanner(1947–1973) Julius L Patching (1973–1985) Phillip Coles (1985–1993) Perry Crosswhite (1993–1995) Craig McLatchey (1995–2001) Robert Elphinston (2001–2004) Craig Phillips (2005–2014) Fiona de Jong (2014–2016)*[6] Matt Carroll AM (2017-)[7]

*As of 2015 Secretary General position is now chief executive officer [5] International Olympic Committee
International Olympic Committee
members[edit] Leonard A Cuff (1894–1905) (New Zealander who represented Australasia), Richard Coombes (1905–1932), James Taylor (1924–1944), Sir Harold Luxton (1933–1951), Hugh R Weir, (1946–1975), Lewis Luxton (1951–1974), David H Mckenzie (1974–1981), Kevan Gosper, (1977–2013), Phillip W Coles (1982–2011), Susan O'Neill, (2000–2005), John D Coates (2001 – present), James Tomkins (2013–present)[3][5] Funding[edit] The AOC is a non-profit organisation responsible for the preparation and participation of Australian Teams at the Olympic Games (Summer and Winter), the Youth Olympic Games and Regional Games. The AOC is not government funded. The AOC sources its revenues primarily through Sponsorship, Licensing, Fundraising activities and grants from the International Olympic Committee
International Olympic Committee
known as Olympic Solidarity. Through the organisation of the State Olympic Councils, Team Appeal Committees across Australia
Australia
plan corporate events to achieve a national fundraising target. The AOC also receives income distributions from the Australian Olympic Foundation. The AOC neither seeks or derives any funding from the Australian Government. The Commonwealth Government, through the Australian Sports Commission and the Australian Institute of Sport, is the major funding source for high performance sport in Australia. The ASC/AIS, and State Institutes and Academies of Sport provide critical assistance to the AOCs member National Sport Federations and to athletes directly for their preparation for the Olympic Games. In the period 2013–2016, the total AOC quadrennial funding of its Olympic programs is budgeted for in excess of $42 million. This funding includes sports on the program of the 2016 Olympic Games, sports on the programs for the 2014 and 2018 Olympic Winter Games
Olympic Winter Games
and Olympic Education.[8] International Olympic Committee
International Olympic Committee
members[edit] Leonard A Cuff (1894–1905), Richard Coombes (1905–1932), James Taylor (1924–1944), Sir Harold Luxton (1933–1951), Hugh R Weir, (1946–1975), Lewis Luxton (1951–1974), David H Mckenzie (1974–1981), Kevan Gosper, (1977–2013), Phillip W Coles (1982–2011), Susan O'Neill, (2000–2005), John D Coates (2001 – present), James Tomkins (2013–present)[5] See also[edit]

Olympics portal

Australia
Australia
at the Olympics Australian Youth Olympic Festival Australian Sports Commission Australian Institute of Sport Sport in Australia Boxing Kangaroo Olympic Winter Institute of Australia Australian Olympic Foundation Australian Commonwealth Games Association

References[edit]

^ a b c "AOC Executive".  ^ "Athletes' Commission".  ^ a b c d Gordon, Harry (1994). Australia
Australia
at the Olympic Games. Brisbane: University of Queensland
Queensland
Press. ISBN 0702226270.  ^ Jobling, Ian (November 1994). "Olympic Proposals and Bids by Australian Cities" (PDF). Sporting Traditions. 11 (1): 37–56.  ^ a b c d "AOC Office Bearers and Australian IOC Members". Australian Olympic Committee website. Retrieved 13 May 2015.  ^ " Australian Olympic Committee
Australian Olympic Committee
CEO Fiona de Jong resigns". The Guardian. 10 October 2016. Retrieved 14 October 2016.  ^ "Carroll is new Aust Olympic Committee CEO". SBS News. 13 March 2017. Retrieved 13 March 2017.  ^ Australian Olympic Committee
Australian Olympic Committee
Programs and Funding Guidelines

Bibliography[edit]

Andrews, Malcolm. Australia
Australia
at the Olympics. Rev. ed. Sydney, ABC Books for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, 2000. Australian Olympic Committee. The compendium : official Australian Olympic statistics, 1896–2002 / compiled by the Australian Olympic Committee. St. Lucia., Qld., University of Queensland
Queensland
Press, c2003 Gordon, Harry. From Athens with pride : the official history of the Australian Olympic movement, 1894 to 2014. St Lucia, Qld., University of Queensland
Queensland
Press, 2014. Gordon, Harry. Gold! : an Olympic celebration. Melbourne : Wilkinson Publishing, 2008 Poke, Robin ad Berry, Kevin (eds). Olympic gold : our greatest individual Olympians since 1896. Sydney, Murdoch Books, 2012.

External links[edit]

Official website Australian Winter Olympic Institute

v t e

Oceania National Olympic Committees
Oceania National Olympic Committees
(ONOC)

American Samoa Australia Cook Islands Federated States of Micronesia Fiji Guam Kiribati Marshall Islands Nauru New Zealand Palau Papua New Guinea Samoa Solomon Islands Tonga Tuvalu Vanuatu

v t e

Sports governing bodies in Australia
Australia
(AUS)

Summer Olympic sports

Aquatics

Diving Swimming Water polo

Archery Athletics Badminton Basketball Boxing Canoeing Cycling Equestrian Fencing Field hockey Football Golf Gymnastics Handball Judo Modern pentathlon Rugby 7's Rowing Sailing Shooting Table tennis Taekwondo Tennis Triathlon Volleyball/Beach volleyball Weightlifting Wrestling

Winter Olympic sports

Biathlon Bobsleigh Curling Skating

Figure Speed Short track

Ice hockey Luge Skeleton Skiing

Alpine Cross country Nordic combined Freestyle Jumping

Snowboarding

Other IOC recognised sports

Air sports Auto racing Bandy Baseball Boules Bowling Bridge Chess Cricket Cue sports Dance sport Floorball Karate Korfball Lacrosse Motor racing Motorcycle racing Mountaineering and Climbing Netball Orienteering Pelota Vasca Polo Powerboating Racquetball Roller sports Rugby union Softball Sport climbing Squash Sumo Surfing Tug of war Lifesaving

Non-surf Surf

Underwater sports Waterski and wakeboard Wushu

Paralympics and disabled sports

Blind sports Disabled Winter Sport Australia

Other sports

Arm wrestling Australian rules football Bodybuilding Bowls Broomball Croquet Drag racing Draughts Gaelic games Gliding Greyhound racing Gridiron Harness racing Jujutsu Karting Kendo Mixed martial arts Muaythai Parkour Polocrosse Powerlifting Professional boxing Radio-controlled racing Thoroughbred horse racing Quidditch Real tennis Rugby league Rodeo Sambo Skateboarding Touch football Woodchopping

Australian Olympic Committee Australian Paralympic Committee Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority Australian Sports Commission Confederation of Australian Sport Commonweal

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