HOME
The Info List - Associated Artists Productions


--- Advertisement ---



Associated Artists Productions
Associated Artists Productions
(a.a.p.) [2][3] was a distributor of theatrical feature films and short subjects for television. Through acquisitions, a.a.p. was later folded into United Artists, with its library eventually passing to Turner Entertainment
Turner Entertainment
Co., now part of Time Warner.

Contents

1 History

1.1 Associated Artists 1.2 Associated Artists Productions 1.3 United Artists
United Artists
Associated

2 Distribution rights 3 Film archive 4 Ownership of properties 5 Subsidiaries 6 References

History Associated Artists Associated Artists was founded in 1948 by Eliot Hyman. It handled syndication of around 500 films, including the Republic Pictures
Republic Pictures
and Robert Lippert libraries, but soon both companies entered television distribution. It also served syndication for Monogram Pictures
Monogram Pictures
and Producers Releasing Corporation.[1] In 1951, Hyman sold the company to David Baird's Lansing Foundation, then to the startup company Motion Pictures for Television
Television
(MPTV), where Hyman served as a consultant. Hyman also became a partner in Mouline Productions, the producers of Moby Dick, while financing and producing other films and TV projects.[1] Associated Artists Productions In July 1954, Hyman launched another TV distribution company which used the Associated Artists name, Associated Artists Productions, with the purchase of the syndication rights to the Universal Sherlock Holmes films from MPTV.[1] His son Ken served as vice-president. Associated Artists Productions
Associated Artists Productions
also acquired distribution right to Johnny Jupiter, Candid Camera, 13 Artcinema Associates feature films, 37 Western films and 3 serials.[1] In 1956, the company was recapitalized and its name was changed to Associated Artists Productions
Associated Artists Productions
Corp. (a.a.p.).[citation needed] Lou Chelser's PRM, Inc. closed the purchase of the entire pre-1950 library owned by Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
Pictures[4] in June 1956 for $21 million with a.a.p. and its theatrical subsidiary Dominant Pictures handling distribution sales.[5] a.a.p. also purchased the Popeye
Popeye
cartoons from Paramount Pictures, which had been produced by Fleischer Studios
Fleischer Studios
and Famous Studios, in June 1956.[6] This purchase and the Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
cartoon package combined gave a.a.p. a library of over 568 theatrical cartoon shorts, which would be staples of children's television for many years. By December 1957, control of a.a.p. had gone to New York Supreme Court between the parties of a.a.p., National Telefilm Associates, and Harris minority shareholder group.[7] United Artists
United Artists
Associated The company was acquired by United Artists
United Artists
(UA) in 1958, with UA borrowing the full amount $27 million from Manufacturers's Trust when a.a.p. shareholders needed cash quickly. The a.a.p. purchase did come with the uncollected accounts' receivable amount around the purchase price.[8] The resulting division was named United Artists
United Artists
Associated, Inc. (u.a.a.). u.a.a. made a deal to distribute Beany and Cecil internationally. With the twin kids syndicated packages of Looney Tunes/ Merrie Melodies
Merrie Melodies
and Popeye, u.a.a. took a look at a number of shorts in the a.a.p./pre-1950 WB library that appealed to kids and packaged them in a third group known as The Big Mac Show, which has a cartoon wrap around.[9] Distribution rights The material a.a.p. bought from Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
Pictures included all of its features produced and distributed by Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
prior to 1950 ( Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
retained the rights to two 1949 films it only distributed), and also included was the film Chain Lightning (produced in 1949 and released in 1950). Also included were the live-action short subjects released prior to September 1, 1948. The cartoon library included every color Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
and Merrie Melodies short released prior to August 1, 1948, and all of the Merrie Melodies produced by Harman-Ising Productions from 1931 to 1933, except Lady, Play Your Mandolin!
Lady, Play Your Mandolin!
(1931). The remaining black-and-white Merrie Melodies
Merrie Melodies
made from 1933 to 1934 and the black-and-white Looney Tunes were already sold to Sunset Productions. Former Warner cartoon director Bob Clampett
Bob Clampett
was hired to catalog the Warner cartoon library. Film archive In 1969, the United Artists
United Artists
Corporation presented to the Library of Congress the earliest surviving preprint material from the pre-1950 film library of Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
(including First National library). The collection contains 200 silent features (1918–29), 800 sound features (1926–50), 1,800 sound shorts (1926–48), and 337 Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies
Merrie Melodies
shorts (1931–48). While consisting largely of Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
releases, the collection includes nearly two hundred sound features released by Monogram Pictures
Monogram Pictures
Corporation between 1936 and 1946 and 231 Popeye
Popeye
cartoons produced by Fleischer Studios
Fleischer Studios
and Famous Studios
Famous Studios
released between 1933 and 1957. Most motion pictures exist in the original black-and-white/Technicolor camera negatives. The Library is converting the nitrate film to acetate safety stock and has obtained reference prints for seventy of the better known Warner Bros. features, such as Gold Diggers of 1935
Gold Diggers of 1935
(1935), High Sierra (1941), I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang
I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang
(1932), The Jazz Singer (1927), and Little Caesar (1930). There are no United Artists
United Artists
films (such as James Bond
James Bond
and The Pink Panther franchise; these are owned by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer) in the United Artists
United Artists
Collection. The early synchronized sound Vitaphone
Vitaphone
shorts are lacking accompanying sound discs. This is a large collection of nitrate negatives and masters, which are still undergoing transfer to acetate stock. Most of the safety film copies exist only in the preservation master stage, limiting accessibility for viewing and duplication. Some years ago, LC obtained 16mm prints (though many are television prints, flat in picture quality and occasionally edited) for pre-1950 Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
features (among the most popular of all American films). Additional prints have been added to the collection, ranging from "reject fine grain master positives" (copies made for preservation but deemed inadequate) suitable for reference use, to high-quality 35mm prints reserved for theatrical projection. United Artists
United Artists
also donated 16mm prints of most of the Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
and Monogram films to the Wisconsin Center for Film and Theater Research, such as My Four Years in Germany (1918),[10] Conductor 1492 (1924), Midnight Lovers (1926) and Joe Palooka in Triple Cross (1951). Titles and holdings are listed in the various M/B/RS catalogs. There are a number of published reference books on Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
films.[11] Copyrights are still in effect for most of the films in this collection; a donor restriction also applies. United Artists
United Artists
has passed through various hands, but current ownership of this material resides with Turner Entertainment
Turner Entertainment
Co. Ownership of properties Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
purchased United Artists
United Artists
(along with the a.a.p. library) from Transamerica Corporation
Transamerica Corporation
in 1981 and became MGM/UA Entertainment Co. The rights to Alfred Hitchcock's 1948 film Rope, originally distributed by Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
(with MGM) and later copyrighted by UATV, reverted to the director in 1968. Distribution rights were later acquired by Universal Pictures
Universal Pictures
in 1983. Turner Broadcasting System
Turner Broadcasting System
(via Turner Entertainment
Turner Entertainment
Co.) took over the library in 1986 after Ted Turner's short-lived ownership of MGM/UA. When Turner sold back the MGM/UA production unit, he kept the MGM library, including select portions of the a.a.p. library (limited to the Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
films and the Popeye
Popeye
cartoons), for his own company. The 1936-1946 Monogram films were not included with the purchase, and thus some of these films remain with MGM. The Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
film libraries were reunited when Time Warner, the studio's parent company since the 1990 merger of Time Inc.
Time Inc.
and Warner Communications (formerly Kinney National Company), bought Turner in 1996. Turner retains the copyrights to the former a.a.p. properties, while Warner handles their distribution. UA originally leased video rights to their library (including the a.a.p. library) to Magnetic Video, the first home video company. Magnetic Video was sold to 20th Century Fox
20th Century Fox
in 1982, becoming 20th Century-Fox Video. In 1982, Fox and CBS
CBS
formed CBS/Fox Video, which continued to distribute the UA/a.a.p. library under license from MGM/UA Home Video until the rights reverted to MGM/UA. After Turner's purchase of the MGM/UA library, MGM/UA Home Video continued to distribute the films on video under license until 1999, when the rights were transferred to Warner Home Video. Laboratory in Brooklyn to Consolidated Labs in N.J. thus avoiding the New York sales tax on the purchase. Subsequently the negatives were split up between several labs in the NY area including DuArt, Mercury, Deluxe and CFI. Each lab made new acetate 16mm internegatives and re-recorded sound tracks. Some of the color films were in Technicolor and, as was Technicolor's policy, they held the 3 color negatives and mage prints. TV stations used 16mm prints for their telecasting and each lab made the prints for the titles they held. These same prints would be the ones used on pre-1999 VHS and laserdisc releases of former a.a.p.-owned films. The a.a.p. versions of these films were also later used for cable television broadcasts (even as recently as March 2011, a.a.p. prints of WB cartoons have been seen on TV). Early releases of WB films released between 1918–1931 bore an a.a.p. copyright renewal notice, since these renewals came before the UA purchase.[12] In the 1990s, Turner began removing the a.a.p. logos from many of the films (although this process started before that by both UA and local television stations). One hundred twenty-three of the Warner Bros. cartoons purchased by a.a.p. were restored from their original negatives for inclusion in Warner Home Video's series of six Looney Tunes Golden Collection DVD box sets. Several more WB cartoons formerly owned by a.a.p. have been restored for other Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
DVD releases since 2010. The black and white Popeye
Popeye
cartoons (and the three Color Specials) were also restored from their original negatives for a series of three Popeye
Popeye
the Sailor DVD sets.[13] Subsidiaries

a.a.p. Records, Inc. was a music arm of a.a.p., which distributed the Official Popeye
Popeye
TV Album. United Telefilms Limited was the Canadian division of a.a.p., which existed around the same time. Live action films used a variation of the main a.a.p. logo, but the initials "UTL" would be spelled out, and a notice at the bottom said "Distributed in Canada by United Telefilms Limited".

United Telefilm Records was a music label of United Telefilms.

UT Records was a subsidiary of United Telefilm Records. Tel Records was another subsidiary of United Telefilm Records. Warwick Records was also a subsidiary of United Telefilm Records.

Dominant Pictures Corporation was a subsidiary of a.a.p., which distributed the features that the company purchased to theaters. It re-released a number of films from the pre-1950 WB library, as well as a number of British films which a.a.p. bought the rights to. Dominant also sold and/or leased 16mm prints of WB library titles to non-theatrical rental libraries. The subsidiary was later folded into UA's main theatrical distribution arm after the company was sold to UA. Some pre-1931 WB library is considered lost.

References

^ a b c d e Hyman Returns to Distrib Business, Reactivates Associated Artist Org. Billboard. New York City. August 28, 1954. p. 6.  ^ Alcott v. Hyman, A.2d 501 (1965). ^ Fleischer v. Phillips, F.2d 515 (1959). ^ Balio, Tino (1987). United Artists: Part 2. 2 (1st ed.). p. 106. ISBN 978-0299230135.  ^ " Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
Features Sale Gets Capital Gains Sanction" (PDF). Broadcasting * Telecasting. June 11, 1956. Retrieved November 24, 2017.  ^ "AAP Buys "Popeye" Films for Tv Station Release" (PDF). Broadcasting Telecasting. Broadcasting Publications, Inc. June 11, 1956. Retrieved November 24, 2017.  ^ "AAP Control Flight Put Off". Billboard. December 16, 1957. p. 7.  ^ Balio, Tino (1987). United Artists: The Company That Changed the Film Industry. University of Wisconsin Press. ISBN 978-0-299-11440-4.  ^ Beck, Jerry (February 16, 2013). "When A.A.P. became U.A.A." Cartoon Research. Retrieved November 24, 2017.  ^ My Four Years in Germany
My Four Years in Germany
(1918)[permanent dead link] ^ Catalog of Holdings The American Film Institute Collection and The United Artists
United Artists
Collection at The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
by The American Film Institute, c. 1978. ^ "Little Caesar : RCA] 76476034122 U - Side 2 - CED Title - Blu-ray DVD Movie Precursor". Cedmagic.com. Retrieved November 24, 2017.  ^ " Popeye
Popeye
DVD". Cartoon Brew. April 2, 2007. Archived from the original on December 9, 2014. Retrieved August 1, 2014. 

v t e

Animated television series created for syndication

Television blocks

BKN Cookie Jar Kids Network The Disney Afternoon The Funtastic World of Hanna-Barbera The Marvel Action Hour Marvel Action Universe

Anthology series

The Comic Strip Force Five Hanna-Barbera Superstars 10 (film series) The Marvel Super Heroes My Little Pony 'n Friends Super Sunday

Syndication distributors

Associated Artists Productions Claster Television Lorimar-Telepictures Orbis Communications CBS
CBS
Television
Television
Distribution Coca-Cola Telecommunications Disney–ABC Domestic Television Harmony Gold USA Lexington Broadcast Services Company The Program Exchange Saban Entertainment Sandy Frank Entertainment Screen Gems SFM Entertainment Turner Program Services Viacom International Westinghouse Broadcasting World Events Productions Worldvision Enterprises

Station owners

Gaylord Entertainment Company New World Communications Taft Broadcasting

Related topics

Weekday cartoon Sunday morning cartoon Toyetic (infomercial) Animation in the United States
United States
in the television era Modern animation in the United States

v t e

Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
and Merrie Melodies

Studios

Harman-Ising Productions (1930–1933) Leon Schlesinger
Leon Schlesinger
Productions (1933–1944) Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
Cartoons (1944–1964) DePatie–Freleng Enterprises
DePatie–Freleng Enterprises
(1964–1967, 1979–1980) Format Films (1965–1967) Warner Bros.-Seven Arts
Warner Bros.-Seven Arts
(1967–1969) Chuck Jones
Chuck Jones
Enterprises (1976–1980, 1994–1997) Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
Animation (1980–present)

People

Tex Avery Bea Benaderet Mel Blanc Bernard B. Brown Arthur Q. Bryan John Burton Daws Butler Bob Clampett Cal Dalton Arthur Davis David H. DePatie Earl Duvall Milt Franklyn Stan Freberg Friz Freleng June Foray Ben Hardaway Hugh Harman Ken Harris William L. Hendricks Cal Howard Rudolf Ising Chuck Jones Jack King William Lava Abe Levitow Michael Maltese Frank Marsales Norman McCabe Robert McKimson Tom Palmer Hawley Pratt Virgil Ross Leon Schlesinger Rod Scribner Edward Selzer Norman Spencer Carl Stalling Frank Tashlin Ben Washam

Characters

Babbit and Catstello Barnyard Dawg Beaky Buzzard Beans Blacque Jacque Shellacque Bosko Buddy Bugs Bunny Bunny and Claude Cecil Turtle Charlie Dog Claude Cat Clyde Bunny Colonel Shuffle Conrad the Cat Cool Cat Count Blood Count The Crusher Daffy Duck Egghead Jr. Elmer Fudd Foghorn Leghorn Foxy Gabby Goat Goofy Gophers Goopy Geer Gossamer Granny Hector the Bulldog Henery Hawk Hippety Hopper Honey Bunny Hubie and Bertie Hugo the Abominable Snowman Inki Lola Bunny Marc Antony and Pussyfoot Marvin the Martian Melissa Duck Merlin the Magic Mouse Michigan J. Frog Miss Prissy Nasty Canasta Penelope Pussycat Pepé Le Pew Pete Puma Petunia Pig Piggy Playboy Penguin Porky Pig Ralph Wolf The Road Runner Rocky and Mugsy Sam Sheepdog Slowpoke Rodriguez Sniffles Speedy Gonzales Spike the Bulldog and Chester the Terrier Sylvester Sylvester Jr. Taz The Three Bears Tweety Wile E. Coyote Willoughby Witch Hazel Yosemite Sam

Shorts

1929–1939 1940–1949 1950–1959 1960–1969 1970–present and miscellaneous Featuring Bugs Bunny Featuring Daffy Duck Featuring Porky Pig Blue Ribbon reissues Censored Eleven Unreleased

Television

Compilations

The Bugs Bunny
Bugs Bunny
Show The Road Runner Show The Porky Pig
Porky Pig
Show Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
on Nickelodeon Merrie Melodies
Merrie Melodies
Starring Bugs Bunny
Bugs Bunny
& Friends Bugs 'n' Daffy

Originals

Tiny Toon Adventures Taz-Mania The Plucky Duck Show The Sylvester & Tweety
Tweety
Mysteries Baby Looney Tunes Duck Dodgers Loonatics Unleashed The Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
Show Wabbit/New Looney Tunes Specials

Feature films

Compilations

The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Movie The Looney Looney Looney Bugs Bunny
Bugs Bunny
Movie Bugs Bunny's 3rd Movie: 1001 Rabbit Tales Daffy Duck's Fantastic Island Daffy Duck's Quackbusters The Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
Hall of Fame

Made for video

Tweety's High-Flying Adventure Bah, Humduck! A Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
Christmas Looney Tunes: Rabbits Run

Documentaries

Bugs Bunny: Superstar Bugs & Daffy: The Wartime Cartoons Chuck Amuck: The Movie

Live-action/ animation

Space Jam Looney Tunes: Back in Action

Music/Songs

"Merrily We Roll Along" "The Merry-Go-Round Broke Down" "Powerhouse" "The Gold Diggers' Song (We're in the Money)" "Camptown Races"

Other

Video games

Book Category

v t e

Popeye
Popeye
created by E. C. Segar

Characters

Main

Popeye Bluto Olive Oyl Wimpy

Supporting

Swee'Pea Alice the Goon Eugene the Jeep George W. Geezil Harold Hamgravy Castor Oyl Poopdeck Pappy Sea Hag

Authors and artists

Hy Eisman Seymour Kneitel Roger Langridge Bobby London Bruce Ozella Bill Pearson Bud Sagendorf E. C. Segar Tom Sims George Wildman Doc Winner Bela Zaboly

Theatrical shorts

Popeye
Popeye
the Sailor

Fleischer Studios
Fleischer Studios
cartoons Famous Studios
Famous Studios
cartoons

Popeye
Popeye
the Sailor DVD series: Volume 1, Volume 2, Volume 3, Volume 4 and Volume 5

Television
Television
shows

Popeye
Popeye
the Sailor The All New Popeye
Popeye
Hour Popeye
Popeye
and Son The Popeye
Popeye
Show

Film/specials

Popeye
Popeye
the Sailor Meets Sindbad the Sailor Popeye
Popeye
the Sailor Meets Ali Baba's Forty Thieves Aladdin and His Wonderful Lamp Popeye
Popeye
Meets the Man Who Hated Laughter The Popeye
Popeye
Valentine's Day Special
Special
- Sweethearts at Sea Popeye
Popeye
(1980) Popeye's Voyage: The Quest for Pappy Popeye

Video games

Arcade game Popeye
Popeye
(Game Boy) Popeye
Popeye
2 Popeye
Popeye
no Eigo Asobi Popeye
Popeye
Saves the Earth Rush for Spinach Ijiwaru Majo Seahag no Maki Beach Volleyball

Other

Popeye
Popeye
Song Folio Popeye
Popeye
Village Popeye
Popeye
and Bluto's Bilge-Rat Barges

v t e

MGM Cartoons

Series

Barney Bear Captain and the Kids Count Screwloose Droopy Flip the Frog George and Junior Happy Harmonies The Pink Panther Red Hot Riding Hood
Red Hot Riding Hood
(Red (Tex Avery)) Screwy Squirrel Butch Dog Spike and Tyke Tom and Jerry
Tom and Jerry
(filmography) One-shots Willie Whopper

People

Tex Avery Joseph Barbera Preston Blair Scott Bradley Friz Freleng William Hanna Hugh Harman Rudolph Ising Ub Iwerks Chuck Jones Michael Lah Dick Lundy Fred Quimby

Related

Associated Artists Productions DePatie-Freleng Enterprises MGM Animation/Visual Arts Metro-Goldw

.