HOME
The Info List - Arrow Cross Party





The Arrow Cross
Arrow Cross
Party (Hungarian: Nyilaskeresztes Párt – Hungarista Mozgalom, literally " Arrow Cross
Arrow Cross
Party-Hungarist Movement") was a Nazi party led by Ferenc Szálasi, which led a government in Hungary known as the Government of National Unity from 15 October 1944 to 28 March 1945. During its short rule, ten to fifteen thousand civilians (many of whom were Jews
Jews
and Romani) were murdered outright,[3][4] and 80,000 people were deported from Hungary to various concentration camps in Austria.[5] After the war, Szálasi and other Arrow Cross
Arrow Cross
leaders were tried as war criminals by Hungarian courts.

Contents

1 Formation 2 Ideology 3 Rise to power 4 Arrow Cross
Arrow Cross
rule 5 Post-war developments 6 See also 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External links

Formation[edit]

Part of a series on

Nazism

Organizations

National Socialist German Workers' Party (NSDAP) Sturmabteilung
Sturmabteilung
(SA) Schutzstaffel
Schutzstaffel
(SS) Geheime Staatspolizei (Gestapo) Hitler Youth
Hitler Youth
(HJ) Deutsches Jungvolk
Deutsches Jungvolk
(DJ) League of German Girls
League of German Girls
(BDM) National Socialist German Students' League
National Socialist German Students' League
(NSDStB) National Socialist League of the Reich for Physical Exercise
National Socialist League of the Reich for Physical Exercise
(NSRL) National Socialist Flyers Corps
National Socialist Flyers Corps
(NSFK) National Socialist Motor Corps
National Socialist Motor Corps
(NSKK) National Socialist Women's League
National Socialist Women's League
(NSF) Combat League of Revolutionary National Socialists (KGRNS)

History

Early timeline Hitler's rise to power Machtergreifung German re-armament Nazi Germany Religion
Religion
in Nazi Germany Night of the Long Knives Nuremberg Rally Anti-Comintern Pact Kristallnacht World War II Tripartite Pact The Holocaust Nuremberg trials Neo-Nazism

Ideology

Fascism Totalitarianism Führerprinzip Anti-democratic thought Houston Stewart Chamberlain Gleichschaltung Arthur de Gobineau Hitler's political views Mein Kampf The Myth of the Twentieth Century Militarism National Socialist Program New Order Preussentum und Sozialismus Propaganda Religious aspects Strasserism Symbolism Women in Nazi Germany

Racial ideology

Aryan
Aryan
race Blood and Soil An Essay on the Inequality of the Human Races Eugenics The Foundations of the Nineteenth Century Greater Germanic Reich Heim ins Reich Lebensraum Master race The Passing of the Great Race Racial policy of Nazi Germany Völkisch equality

Final Solution

Concentration camps Deportations Doctors' trial Extermination camps Genocide Ghettos Human experimentation Labour camps Pogroms Racial segregation

People

  Adolf Hitler   Joseph Goebbels   Heinrich Himmler   Hermann Göring   Gregor Strasser   Otto Strasser

Nazism
Nazism
outside of Germany

American Nazi Party Aria Party (Persia) Arrow Cross
Arrow Cross
Party (Hungary) Azure Party (Persia) Bulgarian National Socialist Workers Party German American Bund German National Movement in Liechtenstein Greek National Socialist Party South African Gentile National Socialist Movement Hungarian National Socialist Party Nasjonal Samling
Nasjonal Samling
(Norway) National Movement of Switzerland National Socialist Movement in the Netherlands National Socialist Bloc (Sweden) National Socialist League
National Socialist League
(UK) National Socialist Movement of Chile National Socialist Movement (United States) National Socialist Workers' Party of Denmark National Unity Party (Canada) Nazism
Nazism
in Brazil Nationalist Liberation Alliance
Nationalist Liberation Alliance
(Argentina) SUMKA Ossewabrandwag
Ossewabrandwag
(South Africa) World Union of National Socialists

Lists

Books by or about Adolf Hitler Nazi ideologues Nazi Party
Nazi Party
leaders and officials Nazi Party
Nazi Party
members Speeches given by Adolf Hitler SS personnel

Related topics

Antisemitism Denazification Enabling Act of 1933 Fascism Glossary of Nazi Germany The Holocaust Neo-Nazism Völkisch movement Zweites Buch

Category Nazism
Nazism
portal

v t e

The party was founded by Ferenc Szálasi
Ferenc Szálasi
in 1935 as the Party of National Will.[6] It had its origins in the political philosophy of pro-German extremists such as Gyula Gömbös, who famously coined the term "national socialism" in the 1920s.[7] The party was outlawed in 1937 but was reconstituted in 1939 as the Arrow Cross
Arrow Cross
Party, and was said to be modeled fairly explicitly on the Nazi Party
Nazi Party
of Germany, although Szálasi often and harshly criticized the Nazi regime of Germany.[8] The iconography of the party was clearly inspired by that of the Nazis; the Arrow Cross
Arrow Cross
emblem was an ancient symbol of the Magyar tribes who settled Hungary, thereby suggesting the racial purity of the Hungarians in much the same way that the Nazi swastika was intended to allude to the racial purity of the Aryans.[9] The Arrow Cross
Arrow Cross
symbol also referred to the desire to nullify the Treaty of Trianon, and expand the Hungarian state in all cardinal directions towards the former borders of the Kingdom of Hungary.[9] Ideology[edit]

Ministers of the Arrow Cross
Arrow Cross
Party government. Ferenc Szálasi
Ferenc Szálasi
is in the middle of the front row.

The party's ideology was similar to that of German Nazism, although a more accurate comparison might be drawn between Austrofascism
Austrofascism
and Hungarian turanist fascism which was called Hungarism by Ferenc Szálasi – extreme nationalism, the promotion of agriculture, anti-capitalism, anti-communism and militant anti-Semitism. The party and its leader were originally against the German geopolitical plans, so it was a long and very difficult process for Hitler to compromise with Szálasi and his party. The Arrow Cross
Arrow Cross
Party conceived Jews
Jews
in racial as well as religious terms. Thus, although the Arrow Cross Party was certainly far more racist than the Horthy regime, it was still very different from the German Nazi Party. It was also more economically radical than other fascist movements, advocating workers rights and land reforms.[9] Rise to power[edit]

This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (October 2017) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

The roots of Arrow Cross
Arrow Cross
influence can be traced to the outburst of anti-Jewish feeling that followed the Communist putsch and brief rule in Hungary in the spring and summer of 1919. Some Communist leaders, like Tibor Szamuely, came from Jewish families, or like Béla Kun, its leader, who had a Jewish father and a Protestant Swabian mother, were considered to be Jews, and the policies of the Hungarian Soviet Republic came to be associated in the minds of many Hungarians with a "Jewish-Bolshevist conspiracy." After the communist regime was crushed in August 1919, conservatives under the leadership of Admiral
Admiral
Miklós Horthy
Miklós Horthy
took control of the nation. Many Hungarian military
Hungarian military
officers took part in the counter-reprisals known as the White Terror – some of that violence was directed at Jews, simply because they were Jewish.[9] Although the White Guard was officially suppressed, many of its most prevalent members went underground and formed the core membership of a spreading nationalist and anti-Jewish movement. During the 1930s, the Arrow Cross
Arrow Cross
gradually began to dominate Budapest's working class district, defeating the Social Democrats. The Social Democrats did not really contest elections effectively; they had to make a pact with the conservative Horthy regime in order to prevent the abolition of their party.

A World War II
World War II
propaganda poster for the party – the text reads "Despite it all..!"

The Arrow Cross
Arrow Cross
subscribed to the Nazi ideology of "master races",[9] which, in Szálasi's view, included the Hungarians and Germans, and also supported the concept of an order based on the power of the strongest – what Szálasi called a "brutally realistic étatism". But its espousal of territorial claims under the banner of a "Greater Hungary" and Hungarian values (which Szálasi labelled "Hungarizmus" or "Hungarianism") clashed with Nazi ambitions in central Europe, delaying by several years Hitler's endorsement of that party. The German Foreign Office
German Foreign Office
instead endorsed the pro-German Hungarian National Socialist Party, which had some support among German minorities. Before World War II, the Arrow Cross
Arrow Cross
were not proponents of the racial antisemitism of the Nazis, but utilized traditional stereotypes and prejudices to gain votes among voters both in Budapest and the countryside. Nonetheless the constant bickering among these diverse fascist groups prevented the Arrow Cross
Arrow Cross
Party from gaining even more support and power. The Arrow Cross
Arrow Cross
obtained most of its support from a disparate coalition of military officers, soldiers, nationalists and agricultural workers. It was only one of a number of similar openly fascist factions in Hungary but was by far the most prominent, having developed an effective system of recruitment. When it contested the May 1939 elections – the only ones in which it participated – the party won 15% of the vote and 29 seats in the Hungarian Parliament. This was only a superficially impressive result; the majority of Hungarians were not permitted to vote. It did, however, become one of the most powerful parties in Hungary. But the Horthy leadership banned the Arrow Cross
Arrow Cross
on the outbreak of World War II, forcing it to operate underground. In 1944, the Arrow Cross
Arrow Cross
Party's fortunes were abruptly reversed after Hitler lost patience with the reluctance of Horthy and his moderate prime minister, Miklós Kállay, to toe the Nazi line fully. In March 1944, the Germans invaded and officially occupied Hungary; Kállay fled and was replaced by the Nazi proxy, Döme Sztójay. One of Sztójay's first acts was to legalize the Arrow Cross. During the spring and summer of 1944, more than 400,000 Jews
Jews
were herded into centralized ghettos and then deported from the Hungarian countryside to death camps by the Nazis, with the willing help of the Hungarian Interior Ministry and its gendarmerie (the csendőrség), both of whose members had close links to the Arrow Cross. The Jews
Jews
of Budapest
Budapest
were concentrated into so-called Yellow Star Houses, approximately 2,000 single-building mini-ghettos identified by a yellow Star of David over the entrance.[10] In August 1944, before deportations from Budapest
Budapest
began, Horthy used what influence he had to stop the deportations and force the radical antisemites out of the government. As the summer progressed, and the Allied and Soviet armies closed in on central Europe, the ability of the Nazis to devote themselves to Hungary's "Jewish Solution" waned. Arrow Cross
Arrow Cross
rule[edit]

Jewish victims of Arrow Cross
Arrow Cross
men in the court of the Dohány Street Synagogue

In October 1944, Horthy negotiated a cease-fire with the Soviets and ordered Hungarian troops to lay down their arms. In response, Nazi Germany
Germany
launched Operation Panzerfaust, a covert operation which forced Horthy to abdicate in favour of Szálasi, after which he was taken into "protective custody" in Germany. This merely rubber-stamped an Arrow Cross
Arrow Cross
takeover of Budapest
Budapest
on the same day. Szálasi was declared "Leader of the Nation" and prime minister of a "Government of National Unity". Soviet and Romanian forces were already fighting in Hungary even before Szálasi's takeover, and by the time the Arrow Cross
Arrow Cross
took power the Red Army
Red Army
was already far inside the country. As a result, its jurisdiction was effectively limited to an ever-narrowing band of territory in central Hungary, around Budapest. Nonetheless, the Arrow Cross rule, short-lived as it was, was brutal. In fewer than three months, death squads killed as many as 38,000 Hungarian Jews. Arrow Cross officers helped Adolf Eichmann
Adolf Eichmann
re-activate the deportation proceedings from which the Jews
Jews
of Budapest
Budapest
had thus far been spared, sending some 80,000 Jews
Jews
out of the city on slave labor details and many more straight to death camps. Virtually all Jewish males of conscription age were already serving as slave labor for the Hungarian Army's Forced Labor Battalions. Most of them died, including many who were murdered outright after the end of the fighting as they were returning home. Quickly formed battalions raided the Yellow Star Houses and combed the streets, hunting down Jews
Jews
claimed to be partisans and saboteurs since Jews
Jews
attacked Arrow Cross
Arrow Cross
squads at least six to eight times with gunfire.[11] These approximately 200 Jews
Jews
were taken to the bridges crossing the Danube, where they were shot and their bodies borne away by the waters of the river because many were attached to weights while they were handcuffed to each other in pairs.[12] Red Army
Red Army
troops reached the outskirts of the city in December 1944, and the siege action known as the Battle of Budapest
Budapest
began, although it has often been claimed that there is no proof that the Arrow Cross members and the Germans conspired to destroy the Budapest
Budapest
ghetto.[11] Days before he fled the city, Arrow Cross
Arrow Cross
Interior Minister Gabor Vájna commanded that streets and squares named for Jews
Jews
be renamed.[13] As control of the city's institutions began to decay, the Arrow Cross trained their guns on the most helpless possible targets: patients in the beds of the city's two Jewish hospitals on Maros Street and Bethlen Square, and residents in the Jewish poorhouse on Alma Road. As order collapsed, Arrow Cross
Arrow Cross
members continually sought to raid the ghettos and Jewish concentration buildings; the majority of Budapest's Jews
Jews
were saved only by fearless and heroic efforts on the part of a handful of Jewish leaders and foreign diplomats, most famously the Swedish Raoul Wallenberg, the Papal Nuncio
Papal Nuncio
Monsignor Angelo Rotta, Swiss Consul Carl Lutz, Spanish Consul Ángel Sanz Briz
Ángel Sanz Briz
and Giorgio Perlasca.[14] Szálasi knew that the documents used by these diplomats to save Jews
Jews
were invalid according to international law, but he allowed them to use those papers.[8] Charles Ardai, an American entrepreneur, novelist and book publisher, recounted in an Oct. 2008 National Public Radio
National Public Radio
interview an episode recalled by his mother, who survived the Holocaust in Hungary. Her family and other Budapest
Budapest
Jews
Jews
were preparing to flee before the approach of Arrow Cross
Arrow Cross
killers. They pleaded with two young boys who were family relatives to go with them, but they refused because their parents had told them to wait for them at home. As a result, the Arrow Cross men discovered the boys and killed them.[citation needed] The atrocities committed during the Arrow Cross
Arrow Cross
rule, especially the mass murders of Jewish citizens, are depicted at length in György Konrád's largely autobiographical novel Feast in the Garden (1989). The Arrow Cross
Arrow Cross
government effectively fell at the end of January 1945, when the Soviet Army took Pest and the fascist forces retreated across the Danube
Danube
to Buda. Szálasi had escaped from Budapest
Budapest
on December 11, 1944,[8] taking with him the Hungarian royal crown, while Arrow Cross
Arrow Cross
members and German forces continued to fight a rear-guard action in the far west of Hungary until the end of the war in April 1945. Post-war developments[edit]

The "Shoes on the Danube
Danube
Bank" is a memorial in Budapest, conceived by film director Can Togay
Can Togay
with sculptor Gyula Pauer (hu) to honor the Jews
Jews
who were killed by fascist Arrow Cross
Arrow Cross
militiamen in Budapest during World War II.

After the war, many of the Arrow Cross
Arrow Cross
leaders were captured and tried for war crimes. In the first months of postwar adjudication, no fewer than 6,200 indictments for murder were served against Arrow Cross men.[15] Some Arrow Cross
Arrow Cross
officials, including Szálasi himself, were executed. A memorial created by Gyula Pauer (hu), Hungarian sculptor, and Can Togay
Can Togay
in 2005 on the bank of the river Danube
Danube
in Budapest
Budapest
recalls the events when the Budapest
Budapest
Jews
Jews
who were shot by Arrow Cross militiamen between 1944 and 1945. The victims were lined up and shot into the river. They had to take their shoes off, since shoes were valuable belongings at the time.[16] In 2006, a former high-ranking member of the Arrow Cross
Arrow Cross
Party named Lajos Polgár was found to be living in Melbourne, Australia.[5] He was accused of war crimes, but the case was later dropped and Polgár died of natural causes in July of that year.[17] The ideology of the Arrow Cross
Arrow Cross
has resurfaced to some extent in recent years, with the neofascist Hungarian Welfare Association prominent in reviving Szálasi's "Hungarizmus" through its monthly magazine, Magyartudat ("Hungarian Awareness"). But "Hungarism" is very much a fringe element of modern Hungarian politics, and the Hungarian Welfare Association has since dissolved.[18] See also[edit]

Hungarian National Socialist Party Hungary during the Second World War Music Box

References[edit]

^ "Ungváry Krisztián: A politikai erjedés - az 1939-es választások Magyarországon". web.archive.org. 21 November 2001. Archived from the original on 30 November 2002. Retrieved 2 May 2012.  ^ "Szálasi Induló - Ébredj Magyar!". YouTube. 2008-05-17. Retrieved 2017-06-17.  ^ Patai, Raphael (1996). The Jews
Jews
of Hungary:History, Culture, Psychology. 590: Wayne State University Press. p. 730. ISBN 0-8143-2561-0.  ^ Historical Dictionary of the Holocaust, Jack R. Fischel, Scarecrow Press, 17 Jul 2010, pg106 ^ a b Johnston, Chris (2006-02-16). "War Crime Suspect Admits to his Leading Fascist Role". The Age. Archived from the original on 17 May 2009. Retrieved 2009-04-19.  ^ Frucht, Richard C. (2005). Eastern Europe: an Introduction to the People, Lands, and Culture. 376: ABC-CLIO. p. 928. ISBN 1-57607-800-0.  ^ Miklos Molnar, 'A Concise History of Hungary ^ a b c "Amerikai Népszava Online". Nepszava.com. 2015-03-23. Retrieved 2017-06-17.  ^ a b c d e Moshe Y. Herczl (1993). Christianity and the Holocaust of Hungarian Jewry. NYU Press. pp. 67, 70, 233. ISBN 0814773206 – via Google Books. A considerable portion of the media in Hungary described the swastika as a symbol of the forces defending European Christian culture, struggling bravely against the danger of Red expansion from the east and against the Bolshevik-Jewish Weltanschauung. It served as a source of inspiration for the various cross movements, including the Arrow-Cross party.  ^ Patai, Raphael. The Jews
Jews
of Hungary. Wayne State University Press. p. 578.  ^ a b "Szita Szabolcs: A budapesti csillagos házak (1944-45) Remény". Remeny.org. Retrieved 2017-06-17.  ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2009-02-02. Retrieved 2013-05-18.  ^ Patai, p. 586 ^ Patai, p. 589 ^ Patai, p. 587 ^ Stephanie Geyer. "Shoes on the Danube, Budapest". Visitbudapest.travel. Retrieved 2017-06-17.  ^ Lack of political will over Polgar, says Holocaust Centre Archived September 21, 2006, at the Wayback Machine., Australian Jewish News, July 13, 2006 ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2009-02-02. Retrieved 2009-01-20. 

Further reading[edit]

M. Lackó, Arrow-Cross Men: National Socialists 1935–1944 (Budapest, Akadémiai Kiadó 1969). R. Braham, The Politics of Genocide: The Holocaust
The Holocaust
in Hungary (New York: Columbia University Press, 2 vol.; 2nd ed. 1994).

External links[edit] Media related to Arrow Cross
Arrow Cross
Party at Wikimedia Commons

v t e

Far-right
Far-right
nationalism and fascism in Hungary until 1945

Political parties and groups

Arrow Cross
Arrow Cross
Party Christian National Socialist Front Hungarian National Defence Association Hungarian National Socialist Agricultural Labourers' and Workers' Party Hungarian National Socialist Party National Front Rongyos Gárda United Hungarian National Socialist Party

People

Gábor Andreánszky István Antal Endre Bajcsy-Zsilinszky László Baky István Balogh László Bárdossy Károly Beregfy Zoltán Böszörmény László Budinszky László Csatáry László Endre Ákos Farkas Sándor Festetics Imre Finta József Gera Gyula Gömbös Árpád Henney Miklós Horthy Béla Imrédy Győző Istóczy Andor Jaross Béla Jurcsek Gábor Kemény András Kun Lajos Méhelÿ Zoltán Meskó József Nyírő Fidél Pálffy Ottokár Prohászka Pál Prónay Ferenc Rajniss Jenő Rátz Lajos Reményi-Schneller Dezső Szabó Ferenc Szálasi Jenő Szemák Döme Sztójay András Tasnádi Nagy Gábor Vajna Charles Zentai

Related articles

Arrow Cross Budapest
Budapest
ghetto Government of National Unity Greater Hungary Gyorshadtest Kolozsvár ghetto Labour service Levente Associations Szeged Idea Treaty of Trianon Turanism First Vienna Award Second Vienna Award

v t e

Fascism

Theory

Core tenets

Nationalism Imperialism Authoritarianism One-party state Dictatorship Social Darwinism Social interventionism Proletarian nation Propaganda Eugenics Heroism Militarism Economic interventionism Anti-communism

Topics

Definitions Economics Fascism
Fascism
and ideology Fascism
Fascism
worldwide Symbolism

Ideas

Actual Idealism Class collaboration Corporatism Heroic capitalism National Socialism National syndicalism State capitalism Supercapitalism Third Position Totalitarianism Social order

Variants

Italian National Socialism Japanese fascism Islamofascism Falangism British Austrian Metaxism National Radicalism Rexism Clerical Legionarism Integralism

Movements

Africa

Afrikaner Weerstandsbeweging Greyshirts Ossewabrandwag

Asia

Brit HaBirionim Ganap Party Sakurakai Tōhōkai Blue Shirts Society

Northern / Northwestern Europe

Ailtirí na hAiséirghe Black Front (Netherlands) Blueshirts Breton Social-National Workers' Movement British Fascists British People's Party (1939) British Union of Fascists La Cagoule Clerical People's Party Faisceau Flemish National Union French Popular Party General Dutch Fascist League Imperial Fascist League Lapua Movement Nasjonal Samling National Corporate Party
National Corporate Party
(Greenshirts) National Fascisti Nationalist Party (Iceland) National Socialist Bloc National Socialist Dutch Workers Party National Socialist League National Socialist Movement in the Netherlands National Socialist Movement of Norway National Socialist Workers' Party (Sweden) New Party (UK) Patriotic People's Movement (Finland) Pērkonkrusts Rexism

Central Europe

Arrow Cross
Arrow Cross
Party Austrian National Socialism Fatherland Front (Austria) Hungarian National Socialist Party National Front (Switzerland) Nazism Nazi Party Sudeten German Party

Southern Europe

Albanian Fascist Party Democratic Fascist Party Falange Greek National Socialist Party Italian Fascism Italian Social Republic Metaxism National Fascist Party National Union (Portugal) Republican Fascist Party Sammarinese Fascist Party Ustaše ZBOR

Eastern and Southeastern Europe

Bulgarian National Socialist Workers Party Crusade of Romanianism Iron Guard National Fascist Community National Fascist Movement National Italo-Romanian Cultural and Economic Movement National Social Movement (Bulgaria) National Radical Camp Falanga National Romanian Fascio National Renaissance Front Ratniks
Ratniks
(Bulgaria) Romanian Front Russian Fascist Party Russian Women's Fascist Movement Slovak People's Party Union of Bulgarian National Legions Vlajka

North America

Fascism
Fascism
in Canada

Canadian Union of Fascists Parti national social chrétien

Gold shirts German American Bund Silver Legion of America

South America

Falangism
Falangism
in Latin America Brazilian Integralism Bolivian Socialist Falange National Socialist Movement of Chile Revolutionary Union

People

Abba Ahimeir Nimio de Anquín Sadao Araki Marc Augier Maurice Bardèche Jacques Benoist-Méchin Henri Béraud Zoltán Böszörmény Giuseppe Bottai Robert Brasillach Alphonse de Châteaubriant Corneliu Zelea Codreanu Gustavs Celmiņš Enrico Corradini Carlo Costamagna Richard Walther Darré Marcel Déat Léon Degrelle Pierre Drieu La Rochelle Gottfried Feder Giovanni Gentile Joseph Goebbels Hans F. K. Günther Heinrich Himmler Adolf Hitler Ikki Kita Fumimaro Konoe Vihtori Kosola Agostino Lanzillo Dimitrije Ljotić Leopoldo Lugones Curzio Malaparte Ioannis Metaxas Robert Michels Oswald Mosley Benito Mussolini Eoin O'Duffy Gearóid Ó Cuinneagáin Sergio Panunzio Giovanni Papini Ante Pavelić William Dudley Pelley Alfred Ploetz Robert Poulet Vidkun Quisling José Antonio Primo de Rivera Lucien Rebatet Dionisio Ridruejo Alfredo Rocco Konstantin Rodzaevsky Alfred Rosenberg Plínio Salgado Rafael Sánchez Mazas Margherita Sarfatti Carl Schmitt Ardengo Soffici Othmar Spann Ugo Spirito Ferenc Szálasi Hideki Tojo Gonzalo Torrente Ballester Georges Valois Anastasy Vonsyatsky

Works

Literature

The Doctrine of Fascism Fascist Manifesto Manifesto of the Fascist Intellectuals Mein Kampf My Life The Myth of the Twentieth Century Zweites Buch Zaveshchanie russkogo fashista

Periodicals

La Conquista del Estado Das Reich Der Angriff Deutsche Allgemeine Zeitung Deutsche Zeitung in Norwegen Deutsche Zeitung in den Niederlanden Figli d'Italia Fronten Gândirea Gioventù Fascista Je suis partout La France au travail Münchener Beobachter Novopress NS Månedshefte Norsk-Tysk Tidsskrift Das Schwarze Korps Der Stürmer Il Popolo d'Italia Sfarmă-Piatră Signal Vlajka Völkischer Beobachter Nash Put' Fashist l'Alba

Film

Der Sieg des Glaubens Tag der Freiheit: Unsere Wehrmacht Triumph of the Will

Sculpture

Allach

Related topics

Art of the Third Reich Fascist architecture Heroic realism Nazi architecture Nazism
Nazism
and cinema Nazi plunder Syndicalism Conservatism

Organizations

Institutional

Ahnenerbe Chamber of Fasci and Corporations Grand Council of Fascism Imperial Way Faction Italian Nationalist Association Nationalsozialistischer Reichsbund für Leibesübungen Quadrumvirs

Activist

Fascist Union of Youth German American Bund National Youth Organisation (Greece) Russian Fascist Organization Union of Fascist Little Ones Union of Young Fascists – Vanguard (boys) Union of Young Fascists – Vanguard (girls)

Paramilitary

Albanian Militia Black Brigades Blackshirts Blueshirts Einsatzgruppen Gold shirts Greenshirts Greyshirts Hitler Youth Heimwehr Iron Wolf (organization) Lăncieri Makapili Silver Legion of America Schutzstaffel Sturmabteilung Waffen-SS Werwolf

International

Axis powers NSDAP/AO ODESSA

History

1910s

Arditi Fascio

1920s

Aventine Secession Acerbo Law Corfu incident March on Rome Beer Hall Putsch Italian economic battles

1930s

March of the Iron Will German federal election, November 1932 German federal election, March 1933 Enabling Act 6 February 1934 crisis 1934 Montreux Fascist conference Spanish Civil War 4th of August Regime Anti-Comintern Pact

1940s

World War II The Holocaust End in Italy Denazification Nuremberg Trials

Lists

Anti-fascists Books about Hitler British fascist parties Fascist movements by country (A-F G-M N-T U-Z) Nazi ideologues Nazi leaders Speeches by Hitler SS personnel

Related topics

Alt-right Anti-fascism Anti-Nazi League Christofascism Clerical fascism Cryptofascism Esoteric Nazism Fascist (epithet) Fascist mysticism Germanisation Glossary of Nazi Germany Hitler salute Italianization Italianization
Italianization
of South Tyrol Islamofascism Japanization Ku Klux Klan National Bolshevism Neo-fascism Neo-Nazism Roman salute Social fascism Synarchism Unite Against Fascism Völkisch movement Women in Nazi Germany

Category Portal

v t e

Nazism

Organizations

National Socialist German Workers' Party (NSDAP) Sturmabteilung
Sturmabteilung
(SA) Schutzstaffel
Schutzstaffel
(SS) Geheime Staatspolizei (Gestapo) Hitler Youth
Hitler Youth
(HJ) National Socialist Flyers Corps
National Socialist Flyers Corps
(NSFK) National Socialist Motor Corps
National Socialist Motor Corps
(NSKK) League of German Girls
League of German Girls
(BDM) National Socialist League of the Reich for Physical Exercise
National Socialist League of the Reich for Physical Exercise
(NSRL) National Socialist Women's League
National Socialist Women's League
(NSF) Reich Labour Service
Reich Labour Service
(RAD) Werwolf

History

Early timeline Adolf Hitler's rise to power Machtergreifung Re-armament Nazi Germany Night of the Long Knives Nuremberg Rally Anti-Comintern Pact Kristallnacht World War II Tripartite Pact The Holocaust Nuremberg trials Denazification Consequences

Ideology

Architecture Gleichschaltung Anti-democratic thought Strasserism Hitler's political views Mein Kampf
Mein Kampf
(Hitler) Der Mythus des Zwanzigsten Jahrhunderts (Rosenberg) National Socialist Program New Order Preussentum und Sozialismus Propaganda Religious aspects Women in Nazi Germany

Race

Blood and Soil Eugenics Greater Germanic Reich Heim ins Reich Lebensborn Master race Racial policy Religion

Atrocities

Action T4 Final Solution Human experimentation Porajmos

Outside Germany

United States

American Nazi Party German American Bund National Socialist Movement

Arrow Cross
Arrow Cross
Party (Hungary) Bulgarian National Socialist Workers Party German National Movement in Liechtenstein Greek National Socialist Party South African Gentile National Socialist Movement Hungarian National Socialist Party Nasjonal Samling
Nasjonal Samling
(Norway) National Movement of Switzerland National Socialist Movement in the Netherlands National Socialist Bloc (Sweden) National Socialist League
National Socialist League
(UK) National Socialist Movement of Chile National Socialist Workers' Party of Denmark National Unity Party (Canada) Nationalist Liberation Alliance
Nationalist Liberation Alliance
(Argentina) Nazism
Nazism
in Brazil Ossewabrandwag
Ossewabrandwag
(South Africa) World Union of National Socialists

Lists

Books by or about Hitler Ideologues Leaders and officials Nazi Party
Nazi Party
members Speeches given by Hitler SS personnel

People

Adolf Hitler Joseph Goebbels Heinrich Himmler Hermann Göring Martin Bormann Reinhard Heydrich Gregor Strasser Otto Strasser Albert Speer Rudolf Hess Ernst Kaltenbrunner Adolf Eichmann Joachim von Ribbentrop Houston Stewart Chamberlain Alfred Rosenberg Wilhelm Frick Hans Frank Rudolf Höss Josef Mengele Richard Walther Darré Baldur von Schirach Artur Axmann Ernst Röhm Dietrich Eckart Gottfried Feder Ernst Hanfstaengl Julius Streicher Hermann Esser George Lincoln Rockwell

Related topics

Esoteric Nazism Far-right
Far-right
politics German resistance Glossary of Nazi Germany Nazi salute Neo-Nazism Social Darwinism Stormfront Swastika Völkisch movement Zweites Buch

.