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Anu Garg (born April 5, 1967) is an American author and speaker. He is also founder of Wordsmith.org, an online community comprising word lovers from an estimated 200 countries.[1] His books explore the joy of words. He has authored several books about language-related issues for magazines and newspapers. He was a columnist for MSN Encarta and Kahani magazine.[2]

Biography

In 1988 Garg received a B.Tech. in Computer Science from Harcourt Butler Technological Institute.[3] He lives in the Seattle area with his wife, Stuti and daughter, Ananya. Garg became a naturalized US citizen in 2008.[4] He is a vegan.[5]

Career

In 1995 Garg received his Master's in Computer Science from Case Western Reserve University, where he studied on a scholarship.[6] He then worked as a computer scientist at AT&T and other corporations. In 1994, during his studies at Case Western Reserve University, he founded Wordsmith.org.[7] In 2010 the number of subscribers to Wordsmith.org's "A Word A Day" email list reached one million.

Bibliography

  • Garg, Anu; Garg, Stuti (2002). A Word A Day: A Romp Through Some of the Most Unusual and Intriguing Words in English. Wiley. ISBN 978-0471230328. 
  • Garg, Anu (2005). Another Word A Day : An All-new Romp through Some of the Most Unusual and Intriguing Words in English. Wiley. ISBN 978-0471718451. 
  • Garg, Anu (2007). The Dord, the Diglot, and an Avocado or Two: The Hidden Lives and Strange Origins of Common and Not-So-Common Words. Plume. ISBN 978-0452288614. 

See also

References

  1. ^ Hafner, Katie (2002-11-28). "A Word of the Day Keeps Banality at Bay". The New York Times. Retrieved 2007-07-01. 
  2. ^ "Kahani". Retrieved 2008-07-30. 
  3. ^ "Anu Garg's Resume". Wordsmith.org. Retrieved 2016-09-11. 
  4. ^ "Sign up to be a poll judge". Seattlepi.com. 2008-11-02. Retrieved 2013-02-02. 
  5. ^ "On Food: Wordsmith delves into the origins of food-related terms". Seattle Post-Intelligencer. Retrieved 2008-03-19. 
  6. ^ "Log-o-phil-ia Is Addictive". Smithsonian. 2000-12-01. Retrieved 2016-09-11. 
  7. ^ Hauser, Susan G. (September 26, 2001). "A Word a Day – Say, 'Gasconade' – Keeps Boredom at Bay". The Wall Street Journal. Archived from the original on January 24, 2002. 

External links