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Anne Baxter
Anne Baxter
(May 7, 1923 – December 12, 1985) was an American actress, star of Hollywood
Hollywood
films, Broadway productions, and television series. She won an Oscar and a Golden Globe and was nominated for an Emmy. The granddaughter of Frank Lloyd Wright, Baxter studied acting with Maria Ouspenskaya
Maria Ouspenskaya
and had some stage experience before making her film debut in 20 Mule Team
20 Mule Team
(1940). She became a contract player of 20th Century Fox and was loaned out to RKO Pictures
RKO Pictures
for a role in Orson Welles' The Magnificent Ambersons (1942), one of her first important films. In 1947, she won the Academy Award
Academy Award
for Best Supporting Actress for her role as Sophie MacDonald in The Razor's Edge (1946). In 1951, she received an Academy Award
Academy Award
nomination for Best Actress for the title role in All About Eve
All About Eve
(1950). She worked with several of Hollywood's greatest directors, including Alfred Hitchcock
Alfred Hitchcock
in I Confess (1953), Fritz Lang
Fritz Lang
in The Blue Gardenia
The Blue Gardenia
(1953), and Cecil B. DeMille in The Ten Commandments (1956).[2]

Contents

1 Early life 2 Career

2.1 20th Century Fox 2.2 Freelance 2.3 Later career

3 Personal life 4 Death 5 Awards and nominations 6 Filmography 7 Radio appearances 8 See also 9 References 10 External links

Early life[edit] Baxter was born in Michigan City, Indiana, to Catherine Dorothy (née Wright; 1894–1979)[3]—whose father was the famed architect Frank Lloyd Wright—and Kenneth Stuart Baxter (1893–1977), an executive with the Seagrams
Seagrams
Distillery Company. When Baxter was five, she appeared in a school play and, as her family had moved to New York when she was six years old, Baxter continued to act. She was raised in Westchester County, New York[1] and attended Brearley.[4] At age 10, Baxter attended a Broadway play starring Helen Hayes, and was so impressed that she declared to her family that she wanted to become an actress. By the age of 13, she had appeared on Broadway in Seen but Not Heard. During this period, Baxter learned her acting craft as a student of the famed teacher Maria Ouspenskaya. In 1939 she was cast as Katherine Hepburn's little sister in the play The Philadelphia Story, but Hepburn did not like Baxter's acting style and she was replaced during the show's pre-Broadway run. Rather than giving up, she turned to Hollywood.[5] Career[edit] 20th Century Fox[edit]

Joseph Cotten, Anne Baxter
Anne Baxter
and Tim Holt
Tim Holt
in The Magnificent Ambersons (1942)

At 16, Baxter screen-tested for the role of Mrs. DeWinter in Rebecca, losing to Joan Fontaine
Joan Fontaine
because director Alfred Hitchcock
Alfred Hitchcock
deemed Baxter too young for the role, but she soon secured a seven-year contract with 20th Century Fox. In 1940, she was loaned out to MGM
MGM
for her first film, 20 Mule Team, in which she was billed fourth after Wallace Beery, Leo Carrillo, and Marjorie Rambeau. She worked with John Barrymore
John Barrymore
in her next film, The Great Profile (1940), and appeared as the ingénue in the Jack Benny
Jack Benny
vehicle Charley's Aunt (1941). She received star billing in Swamp Water
Swamp Water
(1941) and The Pied Piper (1942), which was nominated for the Academy Award
Academy Award
for Best Picture. Baxter was loaned out to RKO to appear in director Orson Welles' The Magnificent Ambersons (1942). She was Tyrone Power's leading lady in her first Technicolor
Technicolor
film, Crash Dive (1943). In 1943, she played a French maid in a North African hotel (with a credible French accent) in Billy Wilder's Five Graves to Cairo, a Paramount production.[6] She became a popular star in World War II dramas and received top billing in The North Star (1943), The Sullivans (1944), The Eve of St. Mark (1944), and Sunday Dinner for a Soldier
Sunday Dinner for a Soldier
(1944), co-starring her future husband, John Hodiak. Baxter later recalled, "I was getting almost as much mail as Betty Grable. I was our boys' idealized girl next door."[7] She was loaned out to United Artists
United Artists
for the leading role in the film noir Guest in the House
Guest in the House
(1944), and appeared in A Royal Scandal (1945), with Tallulah Bankhead
Tallulah Bankhead
and Charles Coburn; Smoky (1946), with Fred MacMurray; Angel on My Shoulder (1946), with Paul Muni
Paul Muni
and Claude Rains. Baxter co-starred with Tyrone Power
Tyrone Power
and Gene Tierney
Gene Tierney
in 1946's The Razor's Edge, for which she won both the Academy Award
Academy Award
and the Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress. Baxter later recounted that The Razor's Edge contained her only great performance, a hospital scene where the character, Sophie, "loses her husband, child and everything else." She said she relived the death of her brother, who had died at age three.[8] She was loaned out to Paramount for a top-billed role opposite William Holden in Blaze of Noon
Blaze of Noon
(1947) and to MGM
MGM
for a supporting role as Clark Gable's wife in Homecoming (1948). Back at 20th Century Fox, she played a wide variety of roles: a lawyer in love with Cornel Wilde
Cornel Wilde
in The Walls of Jericho (1948); Tyrone Power's Irish romantic interest in The Luck of the Irish (1948); a tomboy in Yellow Sky
Yellow Sky
(1948), with Gregory Peck
Gregory Peck
and Richard Widmark; a 1920s flapper in You're My Everything (1949), with Dan Dailey; and another tomboy in A Ticket to Tomahawk (1950), again with Dailey.

Baxter as Eve Harrington in All About Eve
All About Eve
(1950)

Baxter as Nefretiri in The Ten Commandments (1956)

In 1950, Baxter was chosen to co-star in All About Eve, largely because of a resemblance to Claudette Colbert, who was originally set to star but dropped out and was replaced by Bette Davis. The original idea was to have Baxter's character gradually come to mirror Colbert's over the course of the film. Baxter received an Academy Award nomination for Best Actress for the title role of Eve Harrington. She said she modeled the role on a bitchy understudy she had for her debut performance in the Broadway play Seen But Not Heard at the age of thirteen and who had threatened to "finish her off."[8] Her next Fox film, Follow the Sun (1951), co-starred Glenn Ford
Glenn Ford
as champion golfer Ben Hogan; Baxter played Hogan's wife, Valerie. She was top-billed in the western The Outcasts of Poker Flat
The Outcasts of Poker Flat
(1950), with Dale Robertson, and was part of an ensemble cast in O. Henry's Full House (1952), her last project for Fox.[9] The comedy My Wife's Best Friend, with MacDonald Carey, was her second and last Fox film released in 1952. Baxter left 20th Century Fox
20th Century Fox
in 1953.[10] Freelance[edit] In 1953, Baxter contracted a two-picture deal for Warner Brothers. Her first was opposite Montgomery Clift
Montgomery Clift
in Alfred Hitchcock's I Confess; the second was the Fritz Lang
Fritz Lang
whodunit The Blue Gardenia, in which she played a woman accused of murder.[8] In June 1954,[11] Baxter won the coveted part of the Egyptian princess and queen Nefretiri, one of her most memorable roles, opposite Charlton Heston's portrayal of Moses
Moses
in Cecil B. DeMille's award-winning The Ten Commandments. Her scenes were shot on Paramount's sound stages in 1955, and she attended the film's New York and Los Angeles premieres in November 1956. Despite criticisms of her interpretation of Nefretiri, DeMille and The Hollywood
Hollywood
Reporter both thought her performance was "very good,"[12][13] and The New York Daily News described her as "remarkably effective."[14] She later remembered the film in an interview:

DeMille asked me to come in. His office at Paramount was bursting with books, props, rolls of linens. I told him I'd have to wear an Egyptian false nose and he pounded the table. "No. Baxter, your Irish nose stays in this picture." He acted out my part and I kept nodding, and I walked out with the part. The soundstage sets were magnificent. It was all corny, sure, but DeMille knew it was corny—that's what he wanted, what he loved. I loved slinking around—really, this was silent film acting but with dialogue.[15]

In 1960, Baxter received a motion pictures star on the Hollywood
Hollywood
Walk of Fame at 6741 Hollywood
Hollywood
Boulevard.[16] Later career[edit] She worked regularly in television in the 1960s. She appeared as one of the What's My Line?
What's My Line?
"Mystery Guests" on the popular Sunday night CBS-TV
CBS-TV
gameshow. She also starred as guest villain "Zelda The Great" in episodes 9 and 10 of the Batman series. She appeared as another villain, "Olga, Queen of the Cossacks", opposite Vincent Price's "Egghead" in three episodes of the show's third season. She also played an old flame of Raymond Burr
Raymond Burr
on his crime series Ironside. Baxter returned to Broadway during the 1970s in Applause, the musical version of All About Eve, but this time in the "Margo Channing" role played by Bette Davis
Bette Davis
in the film (succeeding Lauren Bacall, who won a Tony Award
Tony Award
in the role). In the 1970s, Baxter was a frequent guest and guest host on The Mike Douglas Show, since Baxter and its star Mike Douglas
Mike Douglas
were friends. She portrayed a murderous film star on an episode of Columbo, called "Requiem for a Falling Star". In this episode, she portrayed a fading movie star called Nora Chandler, perhaps in homage to the fading star Margo Channing (Bette Davis) of All About Eve, in which Baxter also starred. In 1971, she also had a role in Fools' Parade, as an aging prostitute who helps characters played by Jimmy Stewart, Strother Martin, and Kurt Russell
Kurt Russell
escape from the villain, played by George Kennedy, before an act of betrayal seals her fate. In 1983, Baxter starred in the television series Hotel, replacing Bette Davis
Bette Davis
after Davis became ill. Personal life[edit]

Baxter at the New York premiere of The Ten Commandments (1956)

Baxter married actor John Hodiak
John Hodiak
on July 7, 1946,[17] at her parents' home in Burlingame, California.[18] They had one daughter, Katrina, born in 1951. Baxter and Hodiak divorced in 1953. At the time, she said they were "basically incompatible,"[19] but in her book she blamed herself for the separation. "I had loved John as much," she wrote. "But we'd eventually congealed in the longest winter in the world. Daily estrangement. Things unsaid. Even a fight would have warmed us. To my shame, I'd picked one at last in order to unfreeze the word 'divorce.'"[20] Hodiak died in 1955. Baxter was a Republican who was active in the campaigns of Thomas E. Dewey[21] and Dwight D. Eisenhower.[22] In the mid-1950s, after her divorce from Hodiak, Baxter began a relationship with her publicist, Russell Birdwell, who took control of her career and directed her in The Come On
The Come On
(1956).[23] The couple formed Baxter-Birdwell Productions to make films on a 10-year plan; Baxter would star in the films and Birdwell would work behind the camera.[24] Princeton University Library
Princeton University Library
has a collection of 175 letters by Baxter to Birdwell.[25] In 1960, Baxter married her second husband, Randolph Galt. Galt was the American owner of a neighboring cattle station near Sydney, Australia, where she was filming Summer of the Seventeenth Doll. She left Hollywood
Hollywood
with Katrina to live with him on a remote 14973 hectare (37,000 acre) cattle station he bought 290 km (180 miles) north of Sydney called Giro (pronounced Ghee-ro). During this time, they had two daughters, Melissa (b. 1962) and Maginel (b. 1963). After the birth of Maginel, back in California, Galt unexpectedly announced that they were moving to a 4452 hectare (11,000 acre) ranch south of Grants, New Mexico.[26] They then moved to Hawaii (his home state) before settling back in Brentwood, Los Angeles, California.[27] Baxter and Galt were divorced in 1969. In 1976, Baxter recounted her courtship with Galt (whom she called "Ran") and their experiences at Giro in a well-received book called Intermission. Melissa Galt became an interior designer and then a business coach, speaker and seminar provider.[28] Maginel became a cloistered Roman Catholic nun, reportedly living in Rome, Italy.[29][30] Baxter married again, in 1977 to David Klee, a prominent stockbroker. It was a brief marriage; Klee died unexpectedly from illness. The newlywed couple had purchased a sprawling property in Easton, Connecticut, which they extensively remodeled; however, Klee did not live to see the renovations completed. Although she maintained a residence in West Hollywood, Baxter considered her Connecticut home to be her primary residence. Baxter was passionate about music and was an active benefactor of the Connecticut Early Music Society. Baxter was a longtime friend of celebrated costume designer Edith Head, whom she first met on the set of Five Graves to Cairo. Head appeared with Baxter in a cameo role in "Requiem for a Falling Star", a 1973 Columbo episode. Upon Head's death in 1981, Melissa Galt, who was also a goddaughter of Head,[31] was bequeathed Head's jewelry collection.[citation needed] Death[edit] Baxter suffered a stroke on December 4, 1985,[32] while hailing a taxi on Madison Avenue
Madison Avenue
in New York City. Baxter remained on life support for eight days in New York's Lenox Hill hospital, until family members agreed that brain function had ceased. She died on December 12, aged 62.[33] Baxter is buried on the estate of Frank Lloyd Wright
Frank Lloyd Wright
at Lloyd Jones Cemetery in Spring Green, Wisconsin.[34] She was survived by her three daughters.[35] Awards and nominations[edit]

Year Award Category Work Result

1947 Golden Globe Award Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture The Razor's Edge Won

1947 Academy Award Best Supporting Actress The Razor's Edge Won

1951 Best Actress All About Eve Nominated

1969 Primetime Emmy Award Outstanding Single Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role The Name of the Game ("The Bobby Currier Story") Nominated

Filmography[edit] Main article: Anne Baxter
Anne Baxter
filmography Radio appearances[edit]

Year Program Episode/source

1945 Old Gold Comedy Theatre Nothing But the Truth[36]

1948 Lux Radio Theatre The Luck of the Irish[37]

1953 Theatre Guild on the Air Trial by Forgery[38]

See also[edit]

Biography portal

List of actors with Academy Award
Academy Award
nominations References[edit]

^ a b http://articles.latimes.com/1985-12-12/news/mn-16533_1_anne-baxter ^ Obituary Variety, December 18, 1985. ^ Anne Baxter
Anne Baxter
genealogy. Rootsweb.com. ^ Jean Stratton (March 27, 2007). "Long-time Princeton Resident Herbert W. Hobler Has Been in the Action and Shaped Events".  ^ David Lee Smith, Hoosiers in Hollywood
Hollywood
(Indianapolis, IN: Indiana Historical Society Press, 2006), 177-178. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0035884/?ref_=nm_flmg_act_92 ^ Bawden, James; Miller, Ron (2016). Conversations with Classic Film Stars: Interviews from Hollywood's Golden Era. University Press of Kentucky. p. 143. ISBN 9780813167121.  ^ a b c Frances Ingram. "Anne Baxter: An Actress, Not a Personality". classicimages.com. Archived from the original on May 25, 2012. Retrieved October 10, 2010.  ^ Bawden, James; Miller, Ron (2016). Conversations with Classic Film Stars: Interviews from Hollywood's Golden Era. University Press of Kentucky. p. 147. ISBN 9780813167121.  ^ Endres, Stacey; Cushman, Robert (2009). Hollywood
Hollywood
at Your Feet: The Story of the World-Famous Chinese Theater. Pomegranate Press. ISBN 9780938817642.  access-date= requires url= (help) ^ "'Commandments' Role For Anne Baxter". Variety. June 7, 1954.  access-date= requires url= (help) ^ DeMille, Cecil Blount (1959). The Autobiography of Cecil B. DeMille. Prentice-Hall. p. 416.  ^ "'The Ten Commandments': Read THR's 1956 Review". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved December 27, 2016.  ^ "Flashback: Original 1956 review of 'The Ten Commandments' in the Daily News". The New York Daily News. Retrieved December 27, 2016.  ^ Bawden, James; Miller, Ron (2016). Conversations with Classic Film Stars: Interviews from Hollywood's Golden Era. University Press of Kentucky. p. 148. ISBN 0813167124. Retrieved December 27, 2016.  ^ " Anne Baxter
Anne Baxter
Hollywood
Hollywood
Walk of Fame". walkoffame.com. Retrieved November 15, 2017.  ^ "Wedding of Film Stars". The Central Queensland Herald. July 11, 1946. Retrieved March 21, 2018.  ^ " John Hodiak
John Hodiak
and Anne Baxter
Anne Baxter
Marry". The Argus. AAP. July 9, 1946. Retrieved March 21, 2018.  ^ "Actor Hodiak Slept When Visitors Came". Illawarra Daily Mercury. January 29, 1953. Retrieved March 21, 2018.  ^ Baxter, Anne (1976). Intermission: A True Story. G. P. Putnam's Sons. p. 23. ISBN 0-345-25773-1.  access-date= requires url= (help) ^ Thomas, Bob (October 24, 1948). " Hollywood
Hollywood
Is Pitching Into Political Race". Sarasota Herald-Tribune. Retrieved August 27, 2015.  ^ "Republicans in Hollywood
Hollywood
Set Stage for Ike". The Owosso Argus-Press. Associated Press. October 9, 1952. Retrieved August 27, 2015.  ^ Bawden, James; Miller, Ron (2016). Conversations with Classic Film Stars: Interviews from Hollywood's Golden Era. University Press of Kentucky. p. 149. ISBN 9780813167121.  access-date= requires url= (help) ^ Mosby, Aline (December 14, 1954). "Ann Baxter [sic] Emerges As Glamour Actress". Madera Tribune. United Press.  access-date= requires url= (help) ^ " Anne Baxter
Anne Baxter
Letters to Russell Birdwell". Princeton University Library. Retrieved March 21, 2018.  ^ Baxter, Anne (1976). Intermission: A True Story. G. P. Putnam's Sons. pp. 378–379. ISBN 0-345-25773-1.  access-date= requires url= (help) ^ Philip Nutman (September 3, 2001). "Galt's heritage and history led to design career". Atlanta Business Chronicle. Retrieved March 25, 2014.  ^ "Melissa Galt Website". Retrieved June 4, 2012.  ^ "An Ann Baxter Accolade". Retrieved October 14, 2009.  ^ Peter Weller. "That Toddling Town - Chicago". Retrieved June 4, 2012.  ^ "Edith Head". The Invisible Theatre. Archived from the original on July 13, 2011.  ^ " Anne Baxter
Anne Baxter
Hospitalized". New York Times. December 5, 1985.  ^ Reid, Alexander. " Anne Baxter
Anne Baxter
is Dead at 62; Actress Won Oscar in 1946." New York Times
New York Times
(1923-Current file): 1. Dec 13 1985. ProQuest. Web. 17 May 2014. ^ "Anne Baxter". Find a Grave. Retrieved October 21, 2010.  ^ AP (December 13, 1985). " Anne Baxter
Anne Baxter
Succumbs at 62". The Victoria Advocate.  ^ "Radio's Golden Age". Nostalgia Digest. 40 (1): 40–41. Winter 2014.  ^ "Those Were the Days". Nostalgia Digest. 39 (1): 32–41. Winter 2013.  ^ Kirby, Walter (January 18, 1953). "Better Radio Programs for the Week". The Decatur Daily Review. p. 40. Retrieved June 20, 2015 – via Newspapers.com. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Anne Baxter.

Anne Baxter
Anne Baxter
on IMDb Anne Baxter
Anne Baxter
at the TCM Movie Database Anne Baxter
Anne Baxter
at the Internet Broadway Database
Internet Broadway Database
Anne Baxter
Anne Baxter
at AllMovie Photographs and literature Anne Baxter
Anne Baxter
at Find a Grave

Awards for Anne Baxter

v t e

Academy Award
Academy Award
for Best Supporting Actress

1936–1950

Gale Sondergaard
Gale Sondergaard
(1936) Alice Brady
Alice Brady
(1937) Fay Bainter
Fay Bainter
(1938) Hattie McDaniel
Hattie McDaniel
(1939) Jane Darwell
Jane Darwell
(1940) Mary Astor
Mary Astor
(1941) Teresa Wright
Teresa Wright
(1942) Katina Paxinou
Katina Paxinou
(1943) Ethel Barrymore
Ethel Barrymore
(1944) Anne Revere
Anne Revere
(1945) Anne Baxter
Anne Baxter
(1946) Celeste Holm
Celeste Holm
(1947) Claire Trevor
Claire Trevor
(1948) Mercedes McCambridge
Mercedes McCambridge
(1949) Josephine Hull (1950)

1951–1975

Kim Hunter
Kim Hunter
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Gloria Grahame
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Donna Reed
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Eva Marie Saint
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Jo Van Fleet
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Dorothy Malone
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Miyoshi Umeki
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Wendy Hiller
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Shelley Winters
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Shirley Jones
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Rita Moreno
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Patty Duke
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Margaret Rutherford
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Lila Kedrova
(1964) Shelley Winters
Shelley Winters
(1965) Sandy Dennis (1966) Estelle Parsons
Estelle Parsons
(1967) Ruth Gordon
Ruth Gordon
(1968) Goldie Hawn
Goldie Hawn
(1969) Helen Hayes
Helen Hayes
(1970) Cloris Leachman
Cloris Leachman
(1971) Eileen Heckart (1972) Tatum O'Neal
Tatum O'Neal
(1973) Ingrid Bergman
Ingrid Bergman
(1974) Lee Grant
Lee Grant
(1975)

1976–2000

Beatrice Straight (1976) Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
(1977) Maggie Smith
Maggie Smith
(1978) Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
(1979) Mary Steenburgen
Mary Steenburgen
(1980) Maureen Stapleton
Maureen Stapleton
(1981) Jessica Lange
Jessica Lange
(1982) Linda Hunt
Linda Hunt
(1983) Peggy Ashcroft
Peggy Ashcroft
(1984) Anjelica Huston
Anjelica Huston
(1985) Dianne Wiest
Dianne Wiest
(1986) Olympia Dukakis
Olympia Dukakis
(1987) Geena Davis
Geena Davis
(1988) Brenda Fricker
Brenda Fricker
(1989) Whoopi Goldberg
Whoopi Goldberg
(1990) Mercedes Ruehl
Mercedes Ruehl
(1991) Marisa Tomei
Marisa Tomei
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Anna Paquin
(1993) Dianne Wiest
Dianne Wiest
(1994) Mira Sorvino
Mira Sorvino
(1995) Juliette Binoche
Juliette Binoche
(1996) Kim Basinger
Kim Basinger
(1997) Judi Dench
Judi Dench
(1998) Angelina Jolie
Angelina Jolie
(1999) Marcia Gay Harden
Marcia Gay Harden
(2000)

2001–present

Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly
(2001) Catherine Zeta-Jones
Catherine Zeta-Jones
(2002) Renée Zellweger
Renée Zellweger
(2003) Cate Blanchett
Cate Blanchett
(2004) Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz
(2005) Jennifer Hudson
Jennifer Hudson
(2006) Tilda Swinton
Tilda Swinton
(2007) Penélope Cruz
Penélope Cruz
(2008) Mo'Nique
Mo'Nique
(2009) Melissa Leo
Melissa Leo
(2010) Octavia Spencer
Octavia Spencer
(2011) Anne Hathaway
Anne Hathaway
(2012) Lupita Nyong'o
Lupita Nyong'o
(2013) Patricia Arquette
Patricia Arquette
(2014) Alicia Vikander
Alicia Vikander
(2015) Viola Davis
Viola Davis
(2016) Allison Janney
Allison Janney
(2017)

v t e

Golden Globe Award
Golden Globe Award
for Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture

Katina Paxinou
Katina Paxinou
(1943) Agnes Moorehead
Agnes Moorehead
(1944) Angela Lansbury
Angela Lansbury
(1945) Anne Baxter
Anne Baxter
(1946) Celeste Holm
Celeste Holm
(1947) Ellen Corby
Ellen Corby
(1948) Mercedes McCambridge
Mercedes McCambridge
(1949) Josephine Hull (1950) Kim Hunter
Kim Hunter
(1951) Katy Jurado
Katy Jurado
(1952) Grace Kelly
Grace Kelly
(1953) Jan Sterling
Jan Sterling
(1954) Marisa Pavan
Marisa Pavan
(1955) Eileen Heckart (1956) Elsa Lanchester
Elsa Lanchester
(1957) Hermione Gingold
Hermione Gingold
(1958) Susan Kohner
Susan Kohner
(1959) Janet Leigh
Janet Leigh
(1960) Rita Moreno
Rita Moreno
(1961) Angela Lansbury
Angela Lansbury
(1962) Margaret Rutherford
Margaret Rutherford
(1963) Agnes Moorehead
Agnes Moorehead
(1964) Ruth Gordon
Ruth Gordon
(1965) Jocelyne LaGarde (1966) Carol Channing
Carol Channing
(1967) Ruth Gordon
Ruth Gordon
(1968) Goldie Hawn
Goldie Hawn
(1969) Karen Black/ Maureen Stapleton
Maureen Stapleton
(1970) Ann-Margret
Ann-Margret
(1971) Shelley Winters
Shelley Winters
(1972) Linda Blair
Linda Blair
(1973) Karen Black
Karen Black
(1974) Brenda Vaccaro
Brenda Vaccaro
(1975) Katharine Ross
Katharine Ross
(1976) Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
(1977) Dyan Cannon
Dyan Cannon
(1978) Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
(1979) Mary Steenburgen
Mary Steenburgen
(1980) Joan Hackett
Joan Hackett
(1981) Jessica Lange
Jessica Lange
(1982) Cher
Cher
(1983) Peggy Ashcroft
Peggy Ashcroft
(1984) Meg Tilly
Meg Tilly
(1985) Maggie Smith
Maggie Smith
(1986) Olympia Dukakis
Olympia Dukakis
(1987) Sigourney Weaver
Sigourney Weaver
(1988) Julia Roberts
Julia Roberts
(1989) Whoopi Goldberg
Whoopi Goldberg
(1990) Mercedes Ruehl
Mercedes Ruehl
(1991) Joan Plowright
Joan Plowright
(1992) Winona Ryder
Winona Ryder
(1993) Dianne Wiest
Dianne Wiest
(1994) Mira Sorvino
Mira Sorvino
(1995) Lauren Bacall
Lauren Bacall
(1996) Kim Basinger
Kim Basinger
(1997) Lynn Redgrave
Lynn Redgrave
(1998) Angelina Jolie
Angelina Jolie
(1999) Kate Hudson
Kate Hudson
(2000) Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly
(2001) Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
(2002) Renée Zellweger
Renée Zellweger
(2003) Natalie Portman
Natalie Portman
(2004) Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz
(2005) Jennifer Hudson
Jennifer Hudson
(2006) Cate Blanchett
Cate Blanchett
(2007) Kate Winslet
Kate Winslet
(2008) Mo'Nique
Mo'Nique
(2009) Melissa Leo
Melissa Leo
(2010) Octavia Spencer
Octavia Spencer
(2011) Anne Hathaway
Anne Hathaway
(2012) Jennifer Lawrence
Jennifer Lawrence
(2013) Patricia Arquette
Patricia Arquette
(2014) Kate Winslet
Kate Winslet
(2015) Viola Davis
Viola Davis
(2016) Allison Janney
Allison Janney
(2017)

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Blue Sky Mausoleum Gammage Memorial Auditorium King Kamehameha Golf Course Clubhouse Massaro House Monona Terrace
Monona Terrace
Community and Convention Center Sharp Family Tourism and Education Center

Unbuilt

Broadacre City Crystal Heights Gordon Strong Automobile Objective The Illinois Plan for Greater Baghdad Point Park Civic Center

Personal homes

Frank Lloyd Wright
Frank Lloyd Wright
Home and Studio Taliesin Taliesin West

Related

Works Taliesin Associated Architects Wasmuth Portfolio Wright Building Conservancy Wright–Prairie School of Architecture
Architecture
Historic District

People

Olgivanna Lloyd Wright
Lloyd Wright
(3rd wife) Jenkin Lloyd Jones
Jenkin Lloyd Jones
(uncle) Lloyd Wright
Lloyd Wright
(son) John Lloyd Wright
Lloyd Wright
(son) Maginel Wright Enright
Maginel Wright Enright
(sister) Eric Lloyd Wright
Lloyd Wright
(grandson) Anne Baxter
Anne Baxter
(granddaughter) Richard Bock
Richard Bock
(associate) Walter Burley Griffin
Walter Burley Griffin
(associate) Marion Griffin (associate) Jaroslav Josef Polívka
Jaroslav Josef Polívka
(associate) Mamah Borthwick
Mamah Borthwick
(client and lover)

Popular culture

The Last Wright: Frank Lloyd Wright
Frank Lloyd Wright
and the Park Inn Hotel Shining Brow Loving Frank "So Long, Frank Lloyd Wright" Work Song: Three Views of Frank Lloyd Wright The Women The Wright 3

Commons Wikinews Wikiquote

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 56799060 LCCN: n85098302 ISNI: 0000 0001 2134 3633 GND: 119050579 SUDOC: 061493007 BNF: cb13929979g (data) BNE: XX1131

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