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The Info List - Amélie Mauresmo


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US$15,022,476

18th in all-time rankings

Int. Tennis
Tennis
HoF 2015 (member page)

Singles

Career record 545–227 (70.65%)

Career titles 25 (2 ITF)

Highest ranking No. 1 (13 September 2004)

Grand Slam Singles results

Australian Open W (2006)

French Open QF (2003, 2004)

Wimbledon W (2006)

US Open SF (2002, 2006)

Other tournaments

Grand Slam Cup QF (1999)

Tour Finals W (2005)

Doubles

Career record 92–62

Career titles 3 (2 ITF)

Highest ranking No. 29 (26 June 2006)

Grand Slam Doubles results

Australian Open QF (1999)

French Open 2R (1997, 1998)

Wimbledon F (2005)

US Open 3R (1999)

Team competitions

Fed Cup W (2003)

Coaching career (2013–)

Michaël Llodra
Michaël Llodra
(2010) (coach-consultant) Victoria Azarenka
Victoria Azarenka
(2012) (coach-consultant) Marion Bartoli
Marion Bartoli
(2013) Andy Murray
Andy Murray
(2014–2016)

Coaching achievements

Coachee Singles Titles total 8

List of notable tournaments (with champion)

Wimbledon (Bartoli) 2x ATP World Tour Masters 1000
ATP World Tour Masters 1000
(Murray)

Medal record

Tennis

2004 Athens Singles

Amélie Simone Mauresmo (French pronunciation: ​[ameli simɔn moʁɛsmo]; born 5 July 1979) is a French former professional tennis player, and a former world No. 1. Mauresmo won two Grand Slam singles titles at the Australian Open
Australian Open
and at Wimbledon, and also won a Silver Medal at the 2004 Summer Olympics. Mauresmo first attained the top ranking on 13 September 2004, holding it for five weeks on that occasion. She was the fifteenth World No. 1 in women's tennis since the computer rankings began. She is well known for her powerful one-handed backhand and strong net play. She officially announced her retirement from professional tennis on 3 December 2009, ending a career of fifteen years. She returned to Wimbledon in 2010, acting as a grass court advisor for Frenchman and 2007 Wimbledon doubles champion Michaël Llodra. She helped Marion Bartoli in 2013 and during Bartoli's triumph at Wimbledon. Mauresmo coached Andy Murray
Andy Murray
from June 2014 until May 2016. Mauresmo was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame
International Tennis Hall of Fame
in 2015.

Contents

1 Early life 2 Player career

2.1 2004: Olympic Silver, World No.1 2.2 2005: WTA Tour Championship crown 2.3 2006: Two Grand Slam titles, back to No. 1 2.4 2007: Out of the top 5 2.5 2008: Shadow of the champion 2.6 2009: Final year and retirement

3 Coaching career

3.1 2010–2011 3.2 2012 3.3 2013 3.4 2014–2016

4 Performance at Grand Slam tournaments 5 Personal life 6 Equipment and endorsements 7 Major finals

7.1 Grand Slam finals

7.1.1 Singles: 3 (2 titles, 1 runner-up) 7.1.2 Doubles: 1 (1 runner-up)

7.2 Olympic finals

7.2.1 Singles: 1 silver medal

8 Fed Cup
Fed Cup
and Olympic teams 9 See also 10 References 11 External links

Early life[edit] Mauresmo was born in Saint-Germain-en-Laye, slightly northwest of Paris. She began playing tennis at the age of four, after being inspired by Yannick Noah's win in the 1983 French Open
French Open
on television. It was after his win that Mauresmo's parents bought her her first tennis racket. Later on in 1998 Yannick Noah
Yannick Noah
picked her on the French team for the Fed Cup. Her mother Françoise is a housewife and her father Francis, who died in March 2004, was an engineer. She has a brother, Fabien, who is an engineer. In 1996, Mauresmo captured both the junior French Open
French Open
and Wimbledon women's singles titles. She was named 1996 Junior World Champion by the International Tennis
Tennis
Federation. Player career[edit] The unseeded Mauresmo reached the Australian Open
Australian Open
final in 1999 with wins over three seeded players, including world no. 1 Lindsay Davenport, before falling to world no. 2 Martina Hingis. Mauresmo was only the second Frenchwoman ever to reach the Australian Open
Australian Open
final; ( Mary Pierce
Mary Pierce
was the first, winning the championship in 1995). She was only the third Frenchwoman to reach any Grand Slam final during the Open Era. Mauresmo defeated Hingis later in the year, en route to the final of the Paris
Paris
indoor event. After the defeat of Davenport at the Australian Open, Mauresmo, 19 at the time, came out as gay to the international press.[1] She "attributed her success on the court to coming to terms with her sexuality and finding love."[1] 2004: Olympic Silver, World No.1[edit] Mauresmo reached the semifinals at Wimbledon, where she lost to Serena Williams in three sets after winning the first set and up a break in the second set. She reached the quarterfinals of the three other Grand Slam tournaments and won three Tier I
Tier I
titles in Rome, Berlin, and Montreal. Mauresmo won a silver medal in singles at the Olympic Games in Athens, where she was defeated by Belgian Justine Henin
Justine Henin
in the final. On 13 September 2004, Mauresmo became the first French tennis player to become world no. 1 since the computer rankings began in the 1970s. She held that ranking for five weeks and was the second woman, after Kim Clijsters, to have attained the top spot without having won a Grand Slam title. 2005: WTA Tour Championship crown[edit] Mauresmo reached the quarter-finals of the Australian Open, but was defeated there by eventual champion Serena Williams. At the French Open, seeded third, Mauresmo was upset in the third round by the then little-known 17-year-old Ana Ivanovic
Ana Ivanovic
of Serbia
Serbia
in three sets.[2] Mauresmo had, at the Australian Open
Australian Open
earlier in the year, become the first player to defeat the Serb in the main draw of a Grand Slam tournament, winning in straight sets also in the third round.[3] At the US Open, Mauresmo lost in the quarter-finals to Mary Pierce
Mary Pierce
in straight sets. That followed a semi-final loss to Lindsay Davenport
Lindsay Davenport
at Wimbledon.

Mauresmo at the 2005 Australian Open

Mauresmo claimed her first singles title at the WTA Tour Championships. She defeated Pierce in the final after losing to Pierce in a round-robin match at that tournament, in three sets. 2006: Two Grand Slam titles, back to No. 1[edit] At the Australian Open, Mauresmo captured her first Grand Slam singles title, defeating Belgian former world no. 1 players Kim Clijsters
Kim Clijsters
and Justine Henin
Justine Henin
en route. Both opponents retired from their respective matches, Clijsters with a right ankle sprain in the third set of their semifinal and Henin from gastroenteritis in the final. Mauresmo was leading in both matches at the time of the retirements, by 6–1, 2–0 against Henin. Mauresmo then won her next two tournaments, the Open Gaz de France tournament in Paris
Paris
(defeating Mary Pierce
Mary Pierce
in the final) and the Proximus Diamond Games
Proximus Diamond Games
in Antwerp (defeating Clijsters in the final). At the Qatar Total Open
Qatar Total Open
in Doha, Mauresmo defeated Martina Hingis
Martina Hingis
in a semifinal, 6–2, 6–2, but lost to Nadia Petrova
Nadia Petrova
in the final. Had she won the final, she would have immediately regained the world no. 1 ranking from Clijsters. Nonetheless, the outcome was sufficient to ensure Mauresmo's return to the world no. 1 ranking on 20 March 2006. Mauresmo then reached the semifinals of the Sony Ericsson Open
Sony Ericsson Open
in Key Biscayne, Florida, where she lost to the eventual champion Svetlana Kuznetsova. Mauresmo lost in the fourth round of the French Open
French Open
to Czech teenager Nicole Vaidišová, 6–7(5–7), 6–1, 6–2. Mauresmo next suffered a first-round loss at the Wimbledon warm-up tournament in Eastbourne. However, Mauresmo and Kuznetsova won the doubles title there, their first as a team and Mauresmo's second overall. Mauresmo was the top seed at Wimbledon. She defeated Anastasia Myskina in a quarterfinal and Maria Sharapova
Maria Sharapova
in a semifinal, and then came back from one set down to defeat Henin in the final 2-6, 6-3, 6-4. The victory was Mauresmo's second Grand Slam singles title and the first on grass. She was also the first Frenchwoman since Suzanne Lenglen
Suzanne Lenglen
to win Wimbledon.The two finalists played an amazing serve and volley style of play in the final coming to the net many times.The Wimbledon final was notable because it was the first and the only time in the decade neither Williams sister's qualified for the Final. She then pulled out of the Fed Cup
Fed Cup
World Group I playoff tie against the Czech Republic
Czech Republic
due to a groin injury sustained during Wimbledon. She also withdrew from the Rogers Cup in Montreal. Her next tournament was the Pilot Pen Tennis
Tennis
tournament in New Haven, Connecticut, where she lost in the quarterfinals to Lindsay Davenport, 4–6, 5–7. At the US Open, Mauresmo lost to Sharapova in the semifinals 0–6, 6–4, 0–6. This was the first time in the open era that a female had lost two sets at love in a US Open semifinal.[4] Mauresmo then reached the final of the China Open, losing to Kuznetsova. During the tournament, Mauresmo won 137 ranking points to help preserve her world no. 1 ranking and ended a nine-match losing streak to Davenport stretching back to January 2000 in Sydney. To conclude the year, Mauresmo reached the final of the WTA Tour Championships in Madrid, losing to Henin, 4–6, 3–6. Mauresmo finished the year ranked world no. 3, behind Henin and Sharapova. 2007: Out of the top 5[edit] Mauresmo started the year in Australia
Australia
with a quarterfinal loss to Jelena Janković
Jelena Janković
at the tournament in Sydney. At the Australian Open, Mauresmo lost in the fourth round to Lucie Šafářová, 4–6, 3–6, after winning her first three matches in straight sets.

Mauresmo at Wimbledon 2007

Mauresmo's next tournament was the Open Gaz de France, where she lost in the semifinals to Nadia Petrova, 7–5, 4–6, 6–7(7), after Mauresmo led 4–1 in the final set and had a match point in the tiebreak. This was Mauresmo's third loss in the last four matches with Petrova. In her next tournament at the Proximus Diamond Games
Proximus Diamond Games
in Antwerp, Belgium, Mauresmo defeated Kim Clijsters
Kim Clijsters
in the final. This was Mauresmo's third consecutive title there, earning her the diamond-encrusted racquet that comes with winning the title at least three times in five years. The trophy cost US$1.3 million. Mauresmo then played the Dubai Duty Free Women's Open, where she lost to Justine Henin
Justine Henin
in the final. On 16 March 2007, Mauresmo received the Chevalier of the Légion d'honneur from President Jacques Chirac. Mauresmo was scheduled to play the Sony Ericsson Open
Sony Ericsson Open
in Key Biscayne, Florida, but was forced to withdraw because of acute appendicitis. She also withdrew from the Bausch & Lomb Championships in Amelia Island, Florida for the same reason. Although she had resumed training, she was not fit enough to compete at the J & S Cup in Warsaw, Poland. At the Qatar Telecom German Open
Qatar Telecom German Open
in Berlin, Mauresmo lost in the third round to Julia Vakulenko
Julia Vakulenko
of Ukraine, and at the Internazionali d'Italia in Rome, she lost in the second round to Australian Samantha Stosur, 7–5, 7–6(4), 6–7(7), after Mauresmo led 5–3 in the third set. Going into the French Open, Mauresmo had played only three tournaments since the end of February. Mauresmo lost to Czech Lucie Šafářová in the third round, 3–6, 6–7(4), committing eight double faults and 49 unforced errors. After losing to Henin in the final of the International Women's Open in Eastbourne, 5–7, 7–6(4), 6–7(2), after being up 4–1 in the deciding set, defending champion Mauresmo went into Wimbledon saying that she was ready to win another major title. However, she lost her fourth round match against Czech teen Nicole Vaidišová, 6–7(6), 6–4, 1–6. The loss dropped her to world no. 6, her first time outside the top five since November 2003. Mauresmo withdrew from the last Grand Slam tournament of the year, the US Open, because of a lack of fitness. She made her return to the tour at the China Open in Beijing. However, she lost in the quarterfinals to homecrowd favourite Peng Shuai. She then entered the Porsche Tennis
Tennis
Grand Prix, where she lost to Elena Dementieva in straight sets. At the Kremlin Cup
Kremlin Cup
in Moscow, Mauresmo lost in the first round to Vera Zvonareva. In Zürich, Mauresmo lost in the second round to Alona Bondarenko
Alona Bondarenko
in three sets. Mauresmo left Dunlop for HEAD racquets. The partnership was to run through 2010. 2008: Shadow of the champion[edit]

Mauresmo at Fortis Championships 2008

Her first tournament of the year was the Tier III Mondial Australian Women's Hardcourts in Gold Coast, Australia, where she lost in the quarterfinals to fourth-seeded Patty Schnyder. At the Australian Open in Melbourne, Mauresmo lost in the third round to Australian Casey Dellacqua, 6–3, 4–6, 4–6. At her next tournament, the Tier II Open Gaz de France
France
in Paris, Mauresmo lost in the quarterfinals to Anna Chakvetadze,6–3, 3–6, 3–6. Mauresmo played both tournaments in the Middle East. At the Tier I Qatar Total Open
Qatar Total Open
in Doha, she lost in the second round to Tamarine Tanasugarn, 6–7(7), 5–7. At the Tier II Barclays Dubai Tennis Championships, Mauresmo reached her third quarterfinal of the year, but was unable to hold off second seed and eventual finalist Svetlana Kuznetsova, losing 1–6, 6–7. Mauresmo then lost in the third round of Tier I
Tier I
events, the Pacific Life Open in Indian Wells, California
Indian Wells, California
and the Sony Ericsson Open
Sony Ericsson Open
in Key Biscayne, Florida. On clay at the Bausch & Lomb Championships in Amelia Island, Florida, Mauresmo lost in the quarterfinals to eventual runner-up Dominika Cibulková. At the French Open, Mauresmo lost in the second round to a Spanish qualifier, Carla Suárez Navarro, 3–6, 4–6. At the International Women's Open in Eastbourne, United Kingdom, Mauresmo defeated sixth-seeded French woman Alizé Cornet
Alizé Cornet
in the first round, 6–1, 4–6, 7–5, but lost in the second round after retiring due to injury from her match with Australian Samantha Stosur while Mauresmo was leading 2–1. At Wimbledon, Mauresmo lost in the third round to two-time former champion Serena Williams, 6–7(5), 1–6. Hampered by a thigh injury, Mauresmo trailed 5–0 in the second set before breaking Williams's serve, only to be broken herself in the next game and lose the match. Mauresmo said after the match, "I was not 100% in my movement but overall I thought there were some good moments in the first set. But I really started to feel the injury in the tiebreak, and I'm not going to talk about the second set."[5] Mauresmo declined the nomination by the French Tennis
Tennis
Federation to play in the Olympic Games after Mary Pierce
Mary Pierce
withdrew. Pauline Parmentier was then nominated.[6] Mauresmo, after a two-month hiatus from tennis due to a thigh injury sustained at Wimbledon, lost in the semifinals of the Western & Southern Financial Group Women's Open in Cincinnati, Ohio
Cincinnati, Ohio
to Nathalie Dechy, 4–6, 6–3, 2–6. After the match, Mauresmo, sounding optimistic about her chances at the upcoming US Open, said "I got four matches in this week, which is what I was looking for. It would have been great to play five but I'll go to New Haven (Connecticut) hoping to find a little more rhythm and build up to the US Open."[7] Mauresmo then lost in the semifinals of the Pilot Pen Tennis
Tennis
tournament (in New Haven) to top-seeded Chakvetadze 6–3, 3–6, 6–1. At the US Open, Mauresmo lost in the fourth round to 16th-seeded Flavia Pennetta 6–3, 6–0. On 29 September, Mauresmo announced that she would split from her long-time coach, Loic Courteau.[8] Mauresmo lost in the first round at Tokyo and Beijing, both times in long three-set defeats by Dominika Cibulková. She reached the second round in Moscow, falling to Dinara Safina, 7–6(2), 4–6, 4–6, and fell in the first round at Zurich to Belarusian teenager Victoria Azarenka. She ended her year with a quarterfinal result at Luxembourg, losing to eventual champion Elena Dementieva. Mauresmo ended the year ranked world no. 24, with a singles record of 32–19. 2009: Final year and retirement[edit]

Mauresmo at the Brisbane International
Brisbane International
tournament in 2009.

At the Brisbane International
Brisbane International
tournament, Mauresmo defeated world no. 177 Jelena Dokić
Jelena Dokić
in the first round, 7–6(9), 7–6(5), before defeating French compatriot Julie Coin
Julie Coin
in the second round, 5–7, 6–2, 7–6(11) in 3 hours, 14 minutes. The fifth-seeded Mauresmo then defeated top-seeded Ana Ivanovic
Ana Ivanovic
in the quarterfinals, 6–3, 6–2, before retiring in her semifinal match against third-seeded Frenchwoman, Marion Bartoli, while trailing 0–4 in the first set. At the Australian Open, Mauresmo lost in the third round to Victoria Azarenka. Mauresmo won her first tournament since 2007 by defeating Elena Dementieva in the final of the Open GDF SUEZ tournament in Paris. Mauresmo lost in the third round of the BNP Paribas Open
BNP Paribas Open
in Indian Wells, California, the first Premier Mandatory event of the year, to Li Na, 5–7, 2–6. The next event on the WTA tour was another Premier Mandatory tournament, the Sony Ericsson Open
Sony Ericsson Open
in Key Biscayne, Florida. Mauresmo was seeded 20th there and lost in the fourth round to unseeded Australian Samantha Stosur, 4–6, 4–6, but ended up winning the doubles event with her tennis partner Svetlana Kuznetsova, after ousting the world champions on their way to the cup. At the Madrid Masters, Mauresmo defeated Zheng Jie
Zheng Jie
in the second round, 6–2, 7–5. She then came from behind to defeat Elena Dementieva, 1–6, 6–4, 6–2, and Ágnes Szávay, 5–7, 6–1, 6–1, in the third round and quarterfinal respectively. She lost against fast-rising teenager star Caroline Wozniacki, 6–7(1) 3–6, in the semifinals. Mauresmo lost against Anna-Lena Grönefeld, 4–6, 3–6, in the first round of the French Open. Mauresmo was the 17th seed at the 2009 Wimbledon Championships. She opened with a 6–1, 4–6, 6–2 win over Melinda Czink.[9] She then defeated Kristína Kučová
Kristína Kučová
and Flavia Pennetta. Her fourth round match against the first seed Dinara Safina
Dinara Safina
became a part of tennis history as it was the first competitive match in which the new, multimillion-pound roof closed due to rain. Mauresmo went on to lose the match, 6–4, 3–6, 4–6. At the 2009 US Open, Mauresmo was the 17th seed, but lost to unseeded Aleksandra Wozniak, 4–6, 0–6, in the second round. Mauresmo announced at a press conference on 8 October 2009 that she was considering retiring from tennis. On 3 December 2009, she officially announced her retirement from tennis at a press conference in Paris.[10] She ended her career ranked World No. 21.[11] Coaching career[edit] 2010–2011[edit] In June and July 2010, Mauresmo temporarily coached fellow French player Michaël Llodra
Michaël Llodra
during the grass season. On 7 November, Mauresmo ran her first marathon at the 2010 New York City Marathon, finishing 3hr: 40m: 20s. At the 2011 French Open, Mauresmo was set to be reunited with Llodra, making her professional return in the mixed doubles competition, but was disqualified before competing, as she had not re-registered for the anti-doping procedures required to compete on the tour. 2012[edit] In 2012, Mauresmo joined forces with 2012 Australian Open
Australian Open
Champion and then-World No.1 Victoria Azarenka
Victoria Azarenka
and her team as a support coach to help the Belarusian in defending her World No. 1 ranking and launching an assault on the remaining three Grand Slams of 2012 and the 2012 Olympics. 2013[edit] In 2013, Mauresmo started coaching French No. 1 Marion Bartoli, joining forces with her shortly before the 2013 Wimbledon Championships.[12] Under her tutelage, Bartoli would win her first Grand Slam title there without dropping a set (or even playing a tiebreak set), and credited her for her career revival (entering these Championships, Bartoli had yet to even reach a semi-final in 2013).[13] 2014–2016[edit] On 8 June 2014, Mauresmo was announced as the new coach of Andy Murray.[14] In December the FFT announced that it was extending Mauresmo's Fed Cup
Fed Cup
contract for another two years.[15] Under her coaching Murray reached the Australian Open
Australian Open
final but he lost to Novak Djokovic in four sets. In May 2015, Mauresmo oversaw Murray's first career titles on clay, including the Madrid Masters, which culminated in a first ever clay court victory over Rafael Nadal. Murray also reached the semi-finals of the French Open
French Open
and Wimbledon. On 9 May 2016, Mauresmo announced that she had stepped down as coach.[16] Performance at Grand Slam tournaments[edit] Although Mauresmo had been one of the top singles players for several years, she did not have success in winning Grand Slam tournaments until 2006. Her talents were never questioned,[citation needed] but Mauresmo was criticized for her mental strength after succumbing to nerves in those events. In consecutive Wimbledon semifinals, she lost to Serena Williams
Serena Williams
and Lindsay Davenport
Lindsay Davenport
after leading comfortably. Before her 2006 Australian Open
Australian Open
title, Mauresmo was often touted as "the greatest women's player never to win a Grand Slam."[17] After winning the 2006 Wimbledon
2006 Wimbledon
title, Mauresmo openly joked, "I don’t want anyone to talk about my nerves any more." Mauresmo is one of the few tennis players, male or female, to have reached the top ranking without first winning a Grand Slam singles title. Other players who had done so were Kim Clijsters, Ivan Lendl, Marcelo Ríos, Jelena Janković, Dinara Safina, Caroline Wozniacki, Karolina Pliskova
Karolina Pliskova
and Simona Halep. Personal life[edit] In April 2015, Mauresmo announced via Twitter that she was pregnant and expecting the baby in August.[18] On 16 August 2015, it was announced that she had given birth to a baby boy.[19][20] She gave birth to her daughter, Ayla, on April 2017.[21] Equipment and endorsements[edit] Mauresmo's apparel and footwear on court was manufactured by Nike, and later Reebok. In the early 2000s, she used Dunlop 200G+1.00 racquet.[22] Major finals[edit] Main article: Amélie Mauresmo
Amélie Mauresmo
career statistics Grand Slam finals[edit] Singles: 3 (2 titles, 1 runner-up)[edit]

Outcome Year Championship Surface Opponent Score

Runner-up 1999 Australian Open Hard Martina Hingis 2–6, 3–6

Winner 2006 Australian Open Hard Justine Henin 6–1, 2–0, retired

Winner 2006 Wimbledon Grass Justine Henin 2–6, 6–3, 6–4

Doubles: 1 (1 runner-up)[edit]

Out Year Championship Surface Partner Opponents Score

Runner-up 2005 Wimbledon Grass Svetlana Kuznetsova Cara Black Liezel Huber 2–6, 1–6

Olympic finals[edit] Singles: 1 silver medal[edit]

Outcome Year Championship Surface Opponent Score

Silver 2004 Athens Olympics Hard Justine Henin 3–6, 3–6

Fed Cup
Fed Cup
and Olympic teams[edit]

French Fed Cup
Fed Cup
team: 1998–99, 2001–05. French Olympic team: 2000, 2004

See also[edit]

Tennis
Tennis
portal

List of Grand Slam Women's Singles champions

References[edit]

^ a b "GaySports - Gay
Gay
Tennis
Tennis
- Lesbian Tennis
Tennis
- gay and lesbian sports site, for sports enthusiasts and athletes worldwide. (Tennis for the gay & lesbian community)". 3 July 2007. Archived from the original on 3 July 2007. CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link) ^ "Serbian starlet shocks Mauresmo". BBC News. 28 May 2005. Retrieved 2012-09-15.  ^ Mauresmo through after second set tussle, ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) ^ "Sharapova stops No. 1 Mauresmo, will meet Henin-Hardenne in U.S. Open final". Usatoday.com. 8 September 2006. Retrieved 2012-06-04.  ^ Cheese, Caroline (27 June 2008). "Battling Serena sees off Mauresmo". BBC News. Retrieved 2012-06-04.  ^ "French stars to miss the Olympics". BBC Sport. BBC. 21 July 2008. Archived from the original on 22 July 2008. Retrieved 22 July 2008.  ^ "Mauresmo's title hopes ended by Dechy in Cincinnati". Uk.reuters.com. 17 August 2008. Retrieved 2012-06-04.  ^ "Amelie Mauresmo splits from coach Loic Courteau". The Daily Telegraph (Sydney). Agence France-Presse. 30 September 2008. Retrieved 14 November 2010.  ^ "Women's singles results". BBC News. 26 June 2007.  ^ "Mauresmo calls time on her career". BBC News. 3 December 2009. Retrieved 23 April 2010.  ^ Hodgkinson, By Mark. "Amelie Mauresmo retires from tennis".  ^ Nguyen, Courtney (14 February 2013). " Marion Bartoli
Marion Bartoli
splits with father-coach, wants Amelie Mauresmo as replacement". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved 10 September 2014.  ^ Marion Bartoli
Marion Bartoli
wins Wimbledon title, The Courier-Mail ^ Andy Murray
Andy Murray
appoints Amelie Mauresmo as coach, BBC Sport ^ "Amelie Mauresmo combines Andy Murray
Andy Murray
& Fed Cup
Fed Cup
roles". 2 December 2014 – via www.bbc.co.uk.  ^ Grez, Matias (9 May 2016). " Andy Murray
Andy Murray
and coach Amelie Mauresmo 'mutually agree' to end partnership". CNN. Retrieved 23 May 2016.  ^ Robson, Douglas (27 August 2006). "Mauresmo's stock can rise, fall in NYC". Usatoday.com. Retrieved 2012-06-04.  ^ Crawford, Harriet (9 April 2015). "Andy Murray's coach Amelie Mauresmo announces pregnancy on Twitter: 'Baby will be here in August'". Daily Mail. Retrieved 30 June 2015.  ^ CNN (17 August 2015). "Andy Murray: Scot dedicates win to new Mum Amelie Mauresmo".  ^ Tennis.com (17 August 2015). "Mauresmo gives birth to first child, a boy".  ^ ESPN.com (26 April 2017). "Amelie Mauresmo announces birth of second child".  ^ "What they're wearing (and hitting with) at Wimbledon". SportsBusiness Journal. 25 June 2001. Retrieved 10 September 2014. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Amélie Mauresmo.

Official website Amélie Mauresmo
Amélie Mauresmo
at the International Tennis
Tennis
Hall of Fame Amélie Mauresmo
Amélie Mauresmo
at the Women's Tennis
Tennis
Association Amélie Mauresmo
Amélie Mauresmo
at the International Tennis
Tennis
Federation Amélie Mauresmo
Amélie Mauresmo
at the International Tennis
Tennis
Federation Junior Profile Amélie Mauresmo
Amélie Mauresmo
at the Fed Cup
Fed Cup
Amélie Mauresmo
Amélie Mauresmo
on IMDb

Sporting positions

Preceded by Justine Henin Kim Clijsters World No. 1 13 September 2004 – 17 October 2004 20 March 2006 – 12 November 2006 Succeeded by Lindsay Davenport Justine Henin

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Women's Tennis
Tennis
Association (WTA) world No. 1 singles players

Chris Evert
Chris Evert
(1975/1985 – 260 w) Evonne Goolagong
Evonne Goolagong
(1976 – 2 w) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
(1978/1987 – 331 w) Tracy Austin
Tracy Austin
(1980 – 22 w) Steffi Graf
Steffi Graf
(1987/1997 – 377 w) // Monica Seles
Monica Seles
(1991/1996 – 178 w) Arantxa Sánchez Vicario
Arantxa Sánchez Vicario
(1995 – 12 w) Martina Hingis
Martina Hingis
(1997/2001 – 209 w) Lindsay Davenport
Lindsay Davenport
(1998/2006 – 98 w) Jennifer Capriati
Jennifer Capriati
(2001/2002 – 17 w) Venus Williams
Venus Williams
(2002 – 11 w) Serena Williams
Serena Williams
(2002/2017 – 319 w) Kim Clijsters
Kim Clijsters
(2003/2011 – 20 w) Justine Henin
Justine Henin
(2003/2008 – 117 w) Amélie Mauresmo
Amélie Mauresmo
(2004/2006 – 39 w) Maria Sharapova
Maria Sharapova
(2005/2012 – 21 w) Ana Ivanovic
Ana Ivanovic
(2008 – 12 w) Jelena Janković
Jelena Janković
(2008/2009 – 18 w) Dinara Safina
Dinara Safina
(2009 – 26 w) Caroline Wozniacki
Caroline Wozniacki
(2010/2018 – 71 w) Victoria Azarenka
Victoria Azarenka
(2012/2013 – 51 w) Angelique Kerber
Angelique Kerber
(2016/2017 – 34 w) Karolína Plíšková
Karolína Plíšková
(2017 – 8 w) Garbiñe Muguruza
Garbiñe Muguruza
(2017 – 4 w) Simona Halep
Simona Halep
(2017/2018 – 22 w)

WTA rankings incepted on November 3, 1975 (year first held/year last held – number of weeks (w)) current No. 1 in bold, as of week of April 2, 2018[update]

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Women's tennis players who won two or more Grand Slam singles titles in one calendar year

Four wins

1953: Maureen Connolly
Maureen Connolly
Brinker 1970: Margaret Court 1988: Steffi Graf

Three wins

1928: Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody (FO&WI&US) 1929: Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody (FO&WI&US) 1962: Margaret Court
Margaret Court
(AO&FO&US) 1965: Margaret Court
Margaret Court
(AO&WI&US) 1969: Margaret Court
Margaret Court
(AO&FO&US) 1972: Billie Jean King
Billie Jean King
(FO&WI&US) 1973: Margaret Court
Margaret Court
(AO&FO&US) 1983: Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
(AO&WI&US) 1984: Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
(FO&WI&US) 1989: Steffi Graf
Steffi Graf
(AO&WI&US) 1991: Monica Seles
Monica Seles
(AO&FO&US) 1992: Monica Seles
Monica Seles
(AO&FO&US) 1993: Steffi Graf
Steffi Graf
(FO&WI&US) 1995: Steffi Graf
Steffi Graf
(FO&WI&US) 1996: Steffi Graf
Steffi Graf
(FO&WI&US) 1997: Martina Hingis
Martina Hingis
(AO&WI&US) 2002: Serena Williams
Serena Williams
(FO&WI&US) 2015: Serena Williams
Serena Williams
(AO&FO&WI)

Two wins

1925: Suzanne Lenglen
Suzanne Lenglen
(FO&WI) 1927: Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody (WI&US) 1930: Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody (FO&WI) 1931: Cilly Aussem
Cilly Aussem
(FO&WI) 1932: Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody (FO&WI) 1939: Alice Marble
Alice Marble
(WI&US) 1946: Pauline Betz
Pauline Betz
Addie (WI&US) 1949: Margaret Osborne duPont
Margaret Osborne duPont
(FO&US) 1950: Louise Bough Clapp (AO&WI) 1952: Maureen Connolly
Maureen Connolly
Brinker (WI&US) 1954: Maureen Connolly
Maureen Connolly
Brinker (FO&WI) 1956: Shirley Fry Irvin
Shirley Fry Irvin
(WI&US) 1957: Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
(WI&US) 1958: Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
(WI&US) 1959: Maria Bueno
Maria Bueno
(WI&US) 1960: Darlene Hard (FO&US) 1963: Margaret Court
Margaret Court
(AO&WI) 1964: Margaret Court
Margaret Court
(AO&FO) 1964: Maria Bueno
Maria Bueno
(WI&US) 1967: Billie Jean King
Billie Jean King
(WI&US) 1968: Billie Jean King
Billie Jean King
(AO&WI) 1971: Evonne Goolagong Cawley
Evonne Goolagong Cawley
(FO&WI) 1974: Chris Evert
Chris Evert
(FO&WI) 1975: Chris Evert
Chris Evert
(FO&US) 1976: Chris Evert
Chris Evert
(WI&US) 1980: Chris Evert
Chris Evert
(FO&US) 1982: Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
(FO&WI) 1982: Chris Evert
Chris Evert
(AO&US) 1985: Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
(AO&WI) 1986: Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
(WI&US) 1987: Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
(WI&US) 1994: Arantxa Sánchez Vicario
Arantxa Sánchez Vicario
(FO&US) 2000: Venus Williams
Venus Williams
(WI&US) 2001: Jennifer Capriati
Jennifer Capriati
(AO&FO) 2001: Venus Williams
Venus Williams
(WI&US) 2003: Serena Williams
Serena Williams
(AO&WI) 2003: Justine Henin
Justine Henin
(FO&US) 2006: Amélie Mauresmo
Amélie Mauresmo
(AO&WI) 2007: Justine Henin
Justine Henin
(FO&US) 2009: Serena Williams
Serena Williams
(AO&WI) 2010: Serena Williams
Serena Williams
(AO&WI) 2012: Serena Williams
Serena Williams
(WI&US) 2013: Serena Williams
Serena Williams
(FO&US) 2016: Angelique Kerber
Angelique Kerber
(AO&US)

AO=Australian Open, FO=French Open, WI=Wimbledon, US=US Open

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French Open
French Open
girls' singles champions

Pre Open Era

1953 Christine Brunon 1954 Beatrice de Chambure 1955 Maria-Teresa Reidl 1956 Eliane Launay 1957 Ilse Buding 1958 Francesca Gordigani 1959 Joan Cross 1960 Françoise Dürr 1961 Robyn Ebbern 1962 Kaye Dening 1963 Monique Salfati 1964 Nicole Seghers 1965 Esme Emanuel 1966 Odile de Roubin 1967 Corinne Molesworth

Open Era

1968 Lesley Hunt 1969 Kazuko Sawamatsu 1970 Veronica Burton 1971 Elena Granatourova 1972 Renáta Tomanová 1973 Mima Jaušovec 1974 Mariana Simionescu 1975 Regina Maršíková 1976 Michelle Tyler 1977 Anne Smith 1978 Hana Mandlíková 1979 Lena Sandin 1980 Kathleen Horvath 1981 Bonnie Gadusek 1982 Manuela Maleeva 1983 Pascale Paradis 1984 Gabriela Sabatini 1985 Laura Garrone 1986 Patricia Tarabini 1987 Natalia Zvereva 1988 Julie Halard 1989 Jennifer Capriati 1990 Magdalena Maleeva 1991 Anna Smashnova 1992 Rossana de los Ríos 1993 Martina Hingis 1994 Martina Hingis 1995 Amélie Cocheteux 1996 Amélie Mauresmo 1997 Justine Henin 1998 Nadia Petrova 1999 Lourdes Domínguez 2000 Virginie Razzano 2001 Kaia Kanepi 2002 Angelique Widjaja 2003 Anna-Lena Grönefeld 2004 Sesil Karatantcheva 2005 Ágnes Szávay 2006 Agnieszka Radwańska 2007 Alizé Cornet 2008 Simona Halep 2009 Kristina Mladenovic 2010 Elina Svitolina 2011 Ons Jabeur 2012 Annika Beck 2013 Belinda Bencic 2014 Daria Kasatkina 2015 Paula Badosa Gibert 2016 Rebeka Masarova 2017 Whitney Osuigwe

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Wimbledon (Open Era) girls' singles champions

1968 Kristy Pigeon 1969 Kazuko Sawamatsu 1970 Sharon Walsh 1971 Marina Kroschina 1972 Ilana Kloss 1973 Ann Kiyomura 1974 Mima Jaušovec 1975 Natasha Chmyreva 1976 Natasha Chmyreva 1977 Lea Antonoplis 1978 Tracy Austin 1979 Mary-Lou Piatek 1980 Debbie Freeman 1981 Zina Garrison 1982 Catherine Tanvier 1983 Pascale Paradis 1984 Annabel Croft 1985 Andrea Holíková 1986 Natasha Zvereva 1987 Natasha Zvereva 1988 Brenda Schultz 1989 Andrea Strnadová 1990 Andrea Strnadová 1991 Barbara Rittner 1992 Chanda Rubin 1993 Nancy Feber 1994 Martina Hingis 1995 Aleksandra Olsza 1996 Amélie Mauresmo 1997 Cara Black 1998 Katarina Srebotnik 1999 Iroda Tulyaganova 2000 María Emilia Salerni 2001 Angelique Widjaja 2002 Vera Dushevina 2003 Kirsten Flipkens 2004 Kateryna Bondarenko 2005 Agnieszka Radwańska 2006 Caroline Wozniacki 2007 Urszula Radwańska 2008 Laura Robson 2009 Noppawan Lertcheewakarn 2010 Kristýna Plíšková 2011 Ashleigh Barty 2012 Eugenie Bouchard 2013 Belinda Bencic 2014 Jeļena Ostapenko 2015 Sofya Zhuk 2016 Anastasia Potapova 2017 Claire Liu

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Wimbledon (Open Era) girls' doubles champions

1982 Penny Barg / Beth Herr 1983 Patty Fendick / Patricia Hy-Boulais 1984 Caroline Kuhlman / Stephanie Rehe 1985 Louise Field / Janine Thompson 1986 Michelle Jaggard / Lisa O’Neill 1987 Natalia Medvedeva / Natalia Zvereva 1988 Jo-Anne Faull / Rachel McQuillan 1989 Jennifer Capriati
Jennifer Capriati
/ Meredith McGrath 1990 Karina Habšudová / Andrea Strnadová 1991 Catherine Barclay / Limor Zaltz 1992 Marja Avotins / Lisa McShea 1993 Laurence Courtois / Nancy Feber 1994 Nannie de Villiers / Lizzie Jelfs 1995 Cara Black
Cara Black
/ Aleksandra Olsza 1996 Olga Barabanschikova / Amélie Mauresmo 1997 Cara Black
Cara Black
/ Irina Selyutina 1998 Eva Dyrberg / Jelena Kostanić 1999 Dája Bedáňová / María Emilia Salerni 2000 Ioana Gaspar / Tatiana Perebiynis 2001 Gisela Dulko
Gisela Dulko
/ Ashley Harkleroad 2002 Elke Clijsters / Barbora Strýcová 2003 Alisa Kleybanova
Alisa Kleybanova
/ Sania Mirza 2004 Victoria Azarenka
Victoria Azarenka
/ Olga Govortsova 2005 Victoria Azarenka
Victoria Azarenka
/ Ágnes Szávay 2006 Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova
Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova
/ Alisa Kleybanova 2007 Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova
Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova
/ Urszula Radwańska 2008 Jessica Moore / Polona Hercog 2009 Noppawan Lertcheewakarn
Noppawan Lertcheewakarn
/ Sally Peers 2010 Tímea Babos
Tímea Babos
/ Sloane Stephens 2011 Eugenie Bouchard
Eugenie Bouchard
/ Grace Min 2012 Eugenie Bouchard
Eugenie Bouchard
/ Taylor Townsend 2013 Barbora Krejčíková
Barbora Krejčíková
/ Kateřina Siniaková 2014 Tami Grende / Ye Qiuyu 2015 Dalma Gálfi
Dalma Gálfi
/ Fanny Stollár 2016 Usue Maitane Arconada
Usue Maitane Arconada
/ Claire Liu 2017 Olga Danilović / Kaja Juvan

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Australian Open
Australian Open
women's singles champions

(1969) Margaret Court (1970) Margaret Court (1971) Margaret Court (1972) Virginia Wade (1973) Margaret Court (1974) Evonne Goolagong (1975) Evonne Goolagong (1976) Evonne Goolagong (1977 (Jan)) Kerry Reid (1977 (Dec)) Evonne Goolagong (1978) Chris O'Neil (1979) Barbara Jordan (1980) Hana Mandlíková (1981) Martina Navratilova (1982) Chris Evert (1983) Martina Navratilova (1984) Chris Evert (1985) Martina Navratilova (1987) Hana Mandlíková (1988) Steffi Graf (1989) Steffi Graf (1990) Steffi Graf (1991) Monica Seles (1992) Monica Seles (1993) Monica Seles (1994) Steffi Graf (1995) Mary Pierce (1996) Monica Seles (1997) Martina Hingis (1998) Martina Hingis (1999) Martina Hingis (2000) Lindsay Davenport (2001) Jennifer Capriati (2002) Jennifer Capriati (2003) Serena Williams (2004) Justine Henin (2005) Serena Williams (2006) Amélie Mauresmo (2007) Serena Williams (2008) Maria Sharapova (2009) Serena Williams (2010) Serena Williams (2011) Kim Clijsters (2012) Victoria Azarenka (2013) Victoria Azarenka (2014) Li Na (2015) Serena Williams (2016) Angelique Kerber (2017) Serena Williams (2018) Caroline Wozniacki

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Wimbledon (Open era) ladies' singles champions

(1968) Billie Jean King (1969) Ann Haydon-Jones (1970) Margaret Court (1971) Evonne Goolagong (1972) Billie Jean King (1973) Billie Jean King (1974) Chris Evert (1975) Billie Jean King (1976) Chris Evert (1977) Virginia Wade (1978) Martina Navratilova (1979) Martina Navratilova (1980) Evonne Goolagong (1981) Chris Evert (1982) Martina Navratilova (1983) Martina Navratilova (1984) Martina Navratilova (1985) Martina Navratilova (1986) Martina Navratilova (1987) Martina Navratilova (1988) Steffi Graf (1989) Steffi Graf (1990) Martina Navratilova (1991) Steffi Graf (1992) Steffi Graf (1993) Steffi Graf (1994) Conchita Martínez (1995) Steffi Graf (1996) Steffi Graf (1997) Martina Hingis (1998) Jana Novotná (1999) Lindsay Davenport (2000) Venus Williams (2001) Venus Williams (2002) Serena Williams (2003) Serena Williams (2004) Maria Sharapova (2005) Venus Williams (2006) Amélie Mauresmo (2007) Venus Williams (2008) Venus Williams (2009) Serena Williams (2010) Serena Williams (2011) Petra Kvitová (2012) Serena Williams (2013) Marion Bartoli (2014) Petra Kvitová (2015) Serena Williams (2016) Serena Williams (2017) Garbiñe Muguruza

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WTA Year-end championships winners singles

(1972) Chris Evert (1973) Chris Evert (1974) Evonne Goolagong (1975) Chris Evert (1976) Evonne Goolagong (1977) Chris Evert (1978) Martina Navratilova (1979) Martina Navratilova (1980) Tracy Austin (1981) Martina Navratilova (1982) Sylvia Hanika (1983) Martina Navratilova (1984) Martina Navratilova (1985) Martina Navratilova (1986-1) Martina Navratilova (1986-2) Martina Navratilova (1987) Steffi Graf (1988) Gabriela Sabatini (1989) Steffi Graf (1990) Monica Seles (1991) Monica Seles (1992) Monica Seles (1993) Steffi Graf (1994) Gabriela Sabatini (1995) Steffi Graf (1996) Steffi Graf (1997) Jana Novotná (1998) Martina Hingis (1999) Lindsay Davenport (2000) Martina Hingis (2001) Serena Williams (2002) Kim Clijsters (2003) Kim Clijsters (2004) Maria Sharapova (2005) Amélie Mauresmo (2006) Justine Henin (2007) Justine Henin (2008) Venus Williams (2009) Serena Williams (2010) Kim Clijsters (2011) Petra Kvitová (2012) Serena Williams (2013) Serena Williams (2014) Serena Williams (2015) Agnieszka Radwańska (2016) Dominika Cibulková (2017) Caroline Wozniacki

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Laureus World Sports Award for Breakthrough of the Year

2000 Sergio García 2001 Marat Safin 2002 Juan Pablo Montoya 2003 Yao Ming 2004 Michelle Wie 2005 Liu Xiang 2006 Rafael Nadal 2007 Amélie Mauresmo 2008 Lewis Hamilton 2009 Rebecca Adlington 2010 Jenson Button 2011 Martin Kaymer 2012 Rory McIlroy 2013 Andy Murray 2014 Marc Márquez 2015 Daniel Ricciardo 2016 Jordan Spieth 2017 Nico Rosberg 2018 Sergio García

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Andy Murray

Entourage

Ivan Lendl
Ivan Lendl
(coach 2012–2014 and 2016–present) Jamie Delgado
Jamie Delgado
(coach 2016–present) Jamie Murray
Jamie Murray
(brother and doubles partner) Judy Murray
Judy Murray
(mother and former coach 1990–1998) Leon Smith (former coach 1999–2004) Pato Alvarez (former coach 2003–2005) Mark Petchey (former coach 2005–2006) Brad Gilbert
Brad Gilbert
(former coach 2006–2007) Miles Maclagan
Miles Maclagan
(former coach 2007–2010) Àlex Corretja
Àlex Corretja
(former coach 2010–2011) Amélie Mauresmo
Amélie Mauresmo
(former coach 2014–2016) Jonas Björkman
Jonas Björkman
(former coach 2015) Dani Vallverdu (former hitting partner)

Career

Achievements Statistics World No. 1 Rivalry with Novak Djokovic Rivalry with Roger Federer Big Four

Seasons

2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017

Notable matches

2012 Wimbledon final 2012 US Open final 2013 Wimbledon final 2016 French Open
French Open
final

Australian Open

Finals: 2010 2011 2013 2015 2016

French Open

Finals: 2016

Wimbledon

2013 2016

US Open

Juniors: 2004 Seniors: 2012

World Tour Finals

2016

Indian Wells

Finals: 2009

Miami

2009 2013

Monte Carlo

Nil

Roma

2016

Madrid

2015

Montreal/Toronto

2009 (M) 2010 (T) 2015 (M)

Cincinnati

2008 2011

Madrid/Shanghai

2008 (M) 2010 2011 2016

Paris

2016

Olympics

2012 2016

Davis Cup

2015

Andy Murray
Andy Murray
Official Website

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 19063874

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