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Alonzo Harding Mourning Jr. (born February 8, 1970) is an American former professional basketball player, who played most of his 15-year National Basketball
Basketball
Association (NBA) career for the Miami
Miami
Heat. Nicknamed "Zo", Mourning played at center. Following his college basketball career at Georgetown University, his tenacity on defense twice earned him NBA
NBA
Defensive Player of the Year Award and perennially placed him on the NBA
NBA
All-Defensive Team. Mourning made a comeback after undergoing a kidney transplant and later won the 2006 NBA
NBA
Championship with the Heat. Mourning also played for the Charlotte Hornets and New Jersey Nets. On March 30, 2009, Mourning became the first Miami Heat
Miami Heat
player to have his number retired.[1] Since June 26, 2009, Mourning has served as Vice President of Player Programs and Development for the Heat. On August 8, 2014, Mourning was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame.[2]

Contents

1 Basketball
Basketball
career

1.1 Early career 1.2 Charlotte Hornets 1.3 Miami
Miami
Heat 1.4 New Jersey Nets 1.5 Return to Miami

2 Retirement 3 Career highlights 4 Kidney transplant 5 Charitable work 6 Personal life 7 NBA
NBA
career statistics

7.1 Regular season 7.2 Playoffs

8 See also 9 References 10 External links

Basketball
Basketball
career[edit] Early career[edit] During his time at Indian River High School in Chesapeake, Virginia, he led the team to 51 straight victories and a state title his junior year (1987). As a senior, he averaged 25 points, 15 rebounds and 12 blocked shots a game. He was named Player of the Year by USA Today, Parade, Gatorade, and Naismith. He was the #1 recruit of the 1988 class, over Billy Owens, Kenny Williams, Shawn Kemp, Stanley Roberts, Christian Laettner, and Malik Sealy, among others. Mourning played college basketball for the Georgetown University
Georgetown University
Hoyas. He led the nation in blocked shots his freshman year and was an All-American his last year there. Charlotte Hornets[edit]

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Mourning was selected second overall in the 1992 NBA
NBA
draft by the Charlotte Hornets, behind Shaquille O'Neal.[3] Mourning was named to the league's all-rookie team in 1993 after averaging 21.0 pts, 10.3 rebounds, and 3.47 blocks. He finished second to Shaquille O'Neal
Shaquille O'Neal
in rookie of the year voting.[4] He posted the highest scoring average of any rookie in Hornets history. Mourning and O'Neal were the first NBA rookies since David Robinson in 1989–90 to average 20 or more points and 10-plus rebounds in their first seasons. Mourning shattered Charlotte's blocked-shots records, becoming the Hornets' all-time career leader in the 49th game of the season. The greatest moment of Mourning's rookie season came on May 5, 1993 in Game 4 of a first-round playoff series against the Boston Celtics. His 20-footer with 4 tenths left gave the Hornets a 104–103 victory in the game and a three-games-to-one victory in the series. The Hornets lost in the second round to the New York Knicks
New York Knicks
in 5 games, with Mourning averaging 23.8 points, 9.9 rebounds and 3.4 blocks in 9 playoff games. The following year, Mourning played in just 60 games, posting almost similar averages of 21.5 points, 10.2 rebounds and 3.1 blocks per game, but the Hornets missed the playoffs. In the 1994–95 season, Mourning and teammate Larry Johnson led the Hornets to a 50-win season and reached the playoffs. Mourning ranked first on the team in scoring (21.3 ppg), rebounding (9.9 rpg), blocked shots (2.92 per game), and field goal percentage (.519), and played in the 1995 NBA
NBA
All-Star Game where he scored 10 points and grabbed 8 rebounds. The Hornets lost in 4 games to the Chicago Bulls in the first round of the playoffs, despite Mourning posting 22 points, 13.3 rebounds, and 3.3 blocks for the series. Miami
Miami
Heat[edit] On November 3, 1995, after Mourning rejected a contract extension offer worth an average of $11.2 million for seven years, the Hornets traded him, along with reserves Pete Myers
Pete Myers
and LeRon Ellis in exchange for Glen Rice, Matt Geiger, Khalid Reeves and a first-round pick in the 1996 NBA
NBA
draft.[5] Mourning served as the centerpiece of the Pat Riley-coached Heat, and in his first season with the team he averaged 23.2 points, 10.4 rebounds and 2.7 blocks a game as Miami
Miami
made the playoffs before being swept in the first round by the 72 win Chicago Bulls. Mourning played in the 1996 NBA
NBA
All-Star Game and was joined by all-star point guard Tim Hardaway
Tim Hardaway
who arrived through a midseason trade. The following year, the Heat won a franchise record 61 games, second in the Eastern Conference to the defending champion Bulls, and Mourning averaged 19.8 points, 9.9 rebounds and 2.9 blocks. In the playoffs, Miami
Miami
defeated the Orlando Magic in five games, and advanced to the conference semifinals against the New York Knicks, where the rivalry between the Heat and the New York Knicks
New York Knicks
intensified. The Knicks took a 3–1 series lead, but following a brawl between Charlie Ward and P. J. Brown
P. J. Brown
late in Game 5, multiple suspensions were handed down. Mourning scored 28 points in Game 6, followed by a 22-point, 12-rebound performance in Game 7 to help Miami
Miami
advance to the Eastern Conference Finals, a franchise first, to face Chicago. The Bulls took a 3–0 series lead, and Mourning guaranteed a victory in Game 4.[6] The Heat won 87–80, but they lost Game 5 100–87. The next season, Mourning posted almost similar averages of 19.2 points, 9.6 rebounds and 2.2 blocks but only played in 58 games, and Miami
Miami
was eliminated in the first round by the Knicks, a series in which Mourning was suspended for the 5th and deciding game due to an on-court fight with ex-teammate Larry Johnson, with Knicks head coach Jeff Van Gundy
Jeff Van Gundy
hanging onto Mourning's leg in an attempt to break it up. In the lockout-shortened 1998–99 season, Mourning averaged 20.1 points, a career high 11 rebounds and a career high 3.9 blocks per game as Miami
Miami
won another Atlantic Division title and the top seed in the playoffs. Mourning won the NBA
NBA
Defensive Player of the Year Award, was named All- NBA
NBA
First Team and finished second to Karl Malone
Karl Malone
in the NBA
NBA
Most Valuable Player Award voting. Despite being the top seed, the Heat lost to the eighth-seeded Knicks in five games, off a last-second shot by Allan Houston
Allan Houston
in Miami. The following season, Mourning averaged 21.7 points a game, 9.5 rebounds and 3.7 blocks a game, and won his second straight Defensive Player of the Year Award. Miami
Miami
swept the Detroit Pistons in the first round of the playoffs, with Mourning dominating the Pistons[quantify]. The Heat faced New York, the fourth straight year that the two teams met in the postseason, and took a 3–2 series lead, but New York won the series in seven games. In the summer, Mourning and Hardaway won a gold medal with the United States at the Olympics in Sydney. During the off-season, Miami
Miami
underwent an overhaul and expectations leading up to the season were high.[citation needed] Prior the start of the 2000–01 season, however, Mourning was diagnosed with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, a kidney condition, that caused him to miss the first five months of the season. He returned to play on March 27, and played a total of 13 games as Miami
Miami
made the postseason but were swept in the first round by the Charlotte Hornets. The following year, Mourning played in 75 games despite his kidney disease, and was selected to play in the 2002 NBA
NBA
All-Star Game, where he scored 13 points off the bench. He averaged 15.7 points, 8.4 rebounds and 2.5 blocks a game, but the Heat missed the playoffs. As his condition worsened, Mourning did not play during the entire 2002–03 season and his expiring contract was not renewed by the Heat. New Jersey Nets[edit] Mourning signed a four-year deal with the New Jersey Nets
New Jersey Nets
in 2003 as a free agent. But on November 25, 2003, Mourning retired from the NBA due to complications from his kidney disease. On December 19 of that year he underwent a successful kidney transplant. In 2004, he started practicing with the Nets again, and made the team's regular season roster during the 2004–05 season. He did not play a significant role with the Nets, however, and openly complained to the media that he wanted out of New Jersey, especially after the team traded away Kenyon Martin.[7] Mourning was traded to the Toronto Raptors on December 17, 2004. Mourning never reported to the Raptors, and was bought out of his contract at a remaining 9 million dollars on February 11, 2005. Raptors team officials later said that he did not meet the medical conditions to play for the team.[8][9] Mourning then finished the season with the Miami Heat
Miami Heat
being paid a second salary, the veteran's minimum.[10] Return to Miami[edit] After being unhappy at the prospect of playing for a losing franchise,[citation needed] Mourning re-signed with the Heat on March 1, 2005. His role was reduced as a backup because of superstar Shaquille O'Neal, although he was called upon as a starter due to O'Neal missing stretches due to injury. O'Neal and Mourning even played together on the court at times, with Mourning playing power forward. Because of physical limitations, his minutes were reduced, but was still a steady contributor. Mourning's tenacious defense, steady offense, and all around hustle helped the Heat gain and maintain the second-best record in the NBA's Eastern conference during the 2004–05 season. Mourning finished the regular season ranking third in blocked shots at 2.66 per game, despite only playing 20 minutes per contest. Miami
Miami
swept the Nets in the first round of the playoffs, with Mourning scoring 21 points with 9 rebounds in just 16 minutes in game 2. In the second round against the Washington Wizards, Mourning stepped in for the injured O'Neal and scored 14 points with 13 rebounds and 4 blocked shots in game 3 as Miami
Miami
completed another four game sweep. Miami
Miami
fell in seven games to the defending champion Detroit Pistons in the Eastern Conference Finals, with Mourning leading the team in blocks with 3 per game for the series. Mourning re-signed with Miami, as the Heat once again re-hauled their roster, acquiring other veterans seeking a title such as Antoine Walker and Gary Payton. Mourning continued to serve as the Heat's backup center, and early on stepped in to serve as the team's starting center after O'Neal suffered an injury early on. Mourning started in 20 games out of a total of 65 games played, averaging 7.8 points and 5.5 rebounds while finishing third in the league with 2.7 blocks a game despite playing as a reserve. In the playoffs, Mourning continued to shine in his role as a defensive player off the bench, as Miami advanced past the Chicago Bulls and New Jersey before defeating Detroit in 6 games to advance to the 2006 NBA
NBA
Finals, the first NBA Finals in franchise history and the first for Mourning. After a 2-0 deficit, Miami
Miami
won all three of its home games led by the spectacular play of Dwyane Wade, and in game 6 in Dallas Mourning came off the bench to score 8 points with 6 rebounds and a team high 5 blocks to help Miami
Miami
win its first NBA
NBA
Championship in franchise history. After winning the championship, Mourning announced that he would return to the Heat in 2006–07 to defend their title, despite receiving offers of more money from other teams, including the San Antonio Spurs. In 2007, Mourning announced he would return for one more year with the Heat and his 15th season. "It will definitely be my last year", Mourning said. After starting the season on a solid note averaging 6 points, 3.8 rebounds and 1.75 blocks in just over 16 minutes played per 24 games,[11] Mourning tore his patellar tendon in his right knee[12] on December 19, 2007, during the first quarter of a loss in Atlanta.[13][14] Mourning has averaged the most blocks in the NBA
NBA
per 48 minutes with 5.46. During the 2007–08 season, he became the Heat's all-time leader in points scored (which has since been surpassed by Dwyane Wade). Retirement[edit] Mourning announced his retirement from the NBA
NBA
on January 22, 2009. In his press conference he said, "I'm 38 years old and I feel like I have physically done all I can for this game."[citation needed] One month later, the Heat announced that they would retire Mourning's number 33 jersey, making him the first Heat player to be so honored.[15] The jersey retirement ceremony occurred on March 30, 2009, when the Heat hosted the Orlando Magic. During the extended halftime ceremony, Mourning was introduced by Florida Governor Charlie Crist; former Georgetown University
Georgetown University
basketball coach John Thompson; Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Famer Patrick Ewing; Heat players Dwyane Wade
Dwyane Wade
and Udonis Haslem; and Heat head coach Pat Riley. In May 2009, he was named to the Hampton Roads Sports Hall of Fame, which honors athletes, coaches and administrators who contributed to sports in southeastern Virginia. In the following April, he was inducted into the Virginia Sports Hall of Fame in recognition of his outstanding high school, collegiate, and professional career as well as his commitment to volunteer service in the communities in which he has lived and worked throughout his life.[16] Mourning announced his return to the Heat in late June 2009; he holds the position of Vice President of Player Programs and Development, which covers community outreach and mentoring young players.[17] On July 2014 the NBA
NBA
announced that Mourning would be inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame on August 8. Career highlights[edit]

NBA
NBA
champion: 2006 (as a player), 2012, 2013 (as vice president of player programs) All- NBA
NBA
First Team: 1999 All- NBA
NBA
Second Team: 2000 2-time NBA
NBA
Defensive Player of the Year: 1999, 2000 2-time NBA
NBA
All-Defensive First Team: 1999, 2000 7-time NBA
NBA
All-Star: 1994–97, 2000–02 Heat franchise second leading scorer with 9,459 points Led NBA
NBA
in blocked shots: 3.91 bpg in 1999 NBA
NBA
All-Rookie 1st Team in 1993 Won bronze at the 1990 FIBA World Championship
1990 FIBA World Championship
with the US national team[18] Won gold at the 1994 FIBA World Championship[19] and the 2000 Olympic Games with the US national team

Kidney transplant[edit] On November 25, 2003, Mourning's cousin and a retired U. S. Marine, Jason Cooper, was visiting Mourning's gravely ill grandmother in the hospital. Mourning's father was present and informed Cooper that Mourning was retiring that very same day from the NBA
NBA
because of a life-threatening kidney disease, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, the same problem that Sean Elliott
Sean Elliott
had in 1999. Cooper asked if there was anything he could do, and began to contemplate donating one of his kidneys to his estranged cousin, whom he had not seen in 25 years and whom he only knew through basketball. Cooper was tested for compatibility, along with many other family members and friends (including fellow NBA
NBA
center and good friend Patrick Ewing); during his grandmother's funeral, Mourning received the news that Jason Cooper was a match. Mourning received Cooper's left kidney on December 19, 2003.[20] Charitable work[edit]

Alonzo Mourning
Alonzo Mourning
with former U.S. President Bill Clinton
Bill Clinton
during Clinton Global Initiative University Day of Service at Carrfour Supportive Housing community for formerly homeless families in Miami, Florida.

In 1997, Mourning established Alonzo Mourning
Alonzo Mourning
Charities Inc. to aid in the development of children and families living in at-risk situations and provides support and services that enhance the lives of youth of promise. After being diagnosed with focal glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), Mourning launched Zo's Fund for Life, a campaign which seeks to raise funds for research, education, and testing to fight focal glomerulosclerosis. Funds are allocated toward research for a cure, education for doctors and the general public, testing for early detection and a fund for those not able to afford medication. In 2007, Mourning along with Andre Agassi, Muhammad Ali, Lance Armstrong, Warrick Dunn, Mia Hamm, Jeff Gordon, Tony Hawk, Andrea Jaeger, Jackie Joyner-Kersee, Mario Lemieux, and Cal Ripken, Jr. founded Athletes for Hope, a charitable organization, which helps professional athletes get involved in charitable causes and inspires millions of non-athletes to volunteer and support the community.[21] In 2003, he also founded the Overtown Youth Center for underprivileged kids, located in Miami, Florida. The program aims to inspire, empower, and enrich these children while teaching them to become positive contributing citizens. In 2009, the Miami-Dade school board named a new high school in North Miami, Florida in his honor, Alonzo and Tracy Mourning Senior High Biscayne Bay Campus. Personal life[edit] Mourning and his wife Tracy have three children: a son named Alonzo III ("Trey"), a daughter named Myka Sydney, and a second son named Alijah (born September 18, 2009).[22] They reside in Pinecrest, Florida, where Mourning purchased a two-story, 9,786-square-foot residence for $4.5 million in 2012.[23] In July 2011 Mourning was sued by Miami-based lawyer Spencer Aronfeld on behalf of Alberto Candoleria for crashing his car into another car and then leaving the scene of the accident. The Florida Highway Patrol later charged Mourning with leaving the scene of a car accident. The accident allegedly occurred after he left Chris Bosh's wedding in Miami
Miami
Beach after 3:00 A.M. Candoleria had just been in an accident when Mourning struck his car. He did not know if he was in his car when Mourning hit him as he claimed to have amnesia.[24][25][26] In 2015 Mourning was one of eight Virginians honored in the Library of Virginia's "Strong Men & Women in Virginia History" for his charitable work and for his contributions to the sport of basketball.[20] NBA
NBA
career statistics[edit]

Legend

  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game

 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw
Free throw
percentage

 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game

 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

† Denotes season in which Mourning won an NBA
NBA
championship

* Led the league

Regular season[edit]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG

1992–93 Charlotte 78 78 33.9 .511 .000 .781 10.3 1.0 .3 3.5 21.0

1993–94 Charlotte 60 59 33.6 .505 .000 .762 10.2 1.4 .5 3.1 21.5

1994–95 Charlotte 77 77 38.2 .519 .324 .761 9.9 1.4 .6 2.9 21.3

1995–96 Miami 70 70 38.2 .523 .300 .685 10.4 2.3 1.0 2.7 23.2

1996–97 Miami 66 65 35.2 .534 .111 .642 9.9 1.6 .8 2.9 19.8

1997–98 Miami 58 56 33.4 .551 .000 .665 9.6 .9 .7 2.2 19.2

1998–99 Miami 46 46 38.1 .511 .000 .652 11.0 1.6 .7 3.9* 20.1

1999–00 Miami 79 78 34.8 .551 .000 .711 9.5 1.6 .5 3.7* 21.7

2000–01 Miami 13 3 23.5 .518 .000 .564 7.8 .9 .3 2.4 13.6

2001–02 Miami 75 74 32.7 .516 .333 .657 8.4 1.2 .4 2.5 15.7

2003–04 New Jersey 12 0 17.9 .465 .000 .882 2.3 .7 .2 .5 8.0

2004–05 New Jersey 18 14 25.4 .453 .000 .593 7.1 .8 .3 2.3 10.4

2004–05 Miami 19 3 12.9 .516 .000 .564 3.7 .2 .2 1.7 5.0

2005–06† Miami 65 20 20.0 .597 .000 .594 5.5 .2 .2 2.7 7.8

2006–07 Miami 77 43 20.4 .560 .000 .601 4.5 .2 .2 2.3 8.6

2007–08 Miami 25 0 15.6 .547 .000 .592 3.7 .3 .2 1.7 6.0

Career 838 686 31.0 .527 .247 .692 8.5 1.1 .5 2.8 17.1

All-Star 4 1 18.8 .545 .000 .667 4.8 1.0 .8 2.0 10.0

Playoffs[edit]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG

1993 Charlotte 9 9 40.8 .480 .000 .774 9.9 1.4 .7 3.4 23.8

1995 Charlotte 4 4 43.5 .421 .500 .837 13.3 2.8 .8 3.3* 22.0

1996 Miami 3 3 30.7 .486 .000 .714 6.0 1.3 .7 1.0 18.0

1997 Miami 17 17 37.1 .491 .375 .555 10.2 1.1 .6 2.7* 17.8

1998 Miami 4 4 34.5 .518 .000 .655 8.5 1.3 .8 2.5 19.3

1999 Miami 5 5 38.8 .521 .000 .653 8.2 .8 1.6 2.8 21.6

2000 Miami 10 10 37.6 .484 .000 .667 10.0 1.4 .2 3.3* 21.6

2001 Miami 3 3 30.3 .480 .000 .579 5.3 1.0 .0 1.7 11.7

2005 Miami 15 2 16.9 .705 .000 .558 4.8 .3 .3 2.2 6.1

2006† Miami 21 0 10.8 .703 .000 .667 2.9 .1 .2 1.1 3.8

2007 Miami 4 0 13.8 .909 .000 .385 2.0 .3 .0 .8 6.3

Career 95 57 27.3 .512 .368 .649 7.0 .9 .5 2.3 13.6

See also[edit]

National Basketball
Basketball
Association portal Biography portal

List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association career blocks leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association career playoff blocks leaders List of NCAA Division I men's basketball career blocks leaders List of NCAA Division I men's basketball season blocks leaders List of NCAA Division I men's basketball career free throw scoring leaders List of NCAA Division I men's basketball players with 2000 points and 1000 rebounds

References[edit]

^ Miami
Miami
Herald article[dead link] ^ "Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame Announces Class of 2014" (Press release). The Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame. April 7, 2014. Archived from the original on April 8, 2014. Retrieved October 14, 2015.  ^ Augustin, Paul (July 2, 2009). "Hornets Happenings: The Five Best Hornets Draft Picks of All Time". Bleacher Report.  ^ Robinson, Tom (2006). Shaquille O'Neal: Giant on and Off the Court. Enslow Publishers. p. 48. ISBN 9780766028234.  ^ Cawthon, Raad; Michael Sokolov (November 4, 1995). "Hornets Forced To Deal Alonzo Mourning, Seeking $13 Million A Year, Went To Miami
Miami
In A Six-player Swap. Glen Rice Became A Hornet". Philadelphia Inquirer. Associated Press. Retrieved June 11, 2014.  ^ Brown, Clifton (May 25, 1997). "Killing the Bulls, With Boredom". The New York Times. Retrieved June 17, 2012.  ^ " NBA
NBA
Trade Winds: Raptors Trade Vince Carter
Vince Carter
to Nets". About.com. December 18, 2004. Archived from the original on June 18, 2006.  ^ "Toronto Raptors buyout Alonzo Mourning, end contract". Insidehoops.com. February 11, 2005. Retrieved June 17, 2012.  ^ "PRO BASKETBALL; Mourning Is Expected To Rejoin the Heat Soon". The New York Times. February 16, 2005. Retrieved June 17, 2012.  ^ Thomsen, Ian (December 15, 2005). "Mourning, Nets share hard feelings". Sports Illustrated. Archived from the original on November 3, 2012. Retrieved June 17, 2012.  ^ " Alonzo Mourning
Alonzo Mourning
Stats, Bio". ESPN. Retrieved October 14, 2015.  ^ "Heat's Mourning tears knee tendon while playing defense vs. Hawks". ESPN. December 20, 2007. Retrieved June 17, 2012.  ^ Odum, Charles (December 20, 2007). "Johnson, Hawks Outlast Heat in OT". National Basketball
Basketball
Association. Retrieved June 17, 2012.  ^ "Atlanta nudges Miami
Miami
in OT behind Johnson's 3-point play". ESPN. Associated Press. December 19, 2007. Retrieved June 17, 2012.  ^ " NBA
NBA
Heat to Retire Mourning's Jersey". Yahoo! Sports. March 1, 2009. [dead link] ^ "Inductee Details – Alonzo Mourning". Virginia Sports Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 14, 2015.  ^ "Zo' Busy: Mourning To Work For Heat's Front Office". Retrieved June 27, 2009. [dead link] ^ "Eleventh World Championship – 1990". USA Basketball. Archived from the original on April 28, 2007.  ^ Pekmic, Asmir (January 19, 2015). "Alonzo Mourning, the NBA
NBA
Legend". Archived from the original on January 24, 2015.  ^ a b "Strong Men & Women in Virginia History: Alonzo Harding "Zo" Mourning Jr. (b. 1970–)". Library of Virginia. Retrieved March 2, 2015.  ^ "Athletes for Hope". Athletes for Hope. Retrieved June 17, 2012.  ^ "Celebrity Baby News Via Alonzo and Tracy Mourning: It's a Boy!". Blackcelebkids.Com. Retrieved June 17, 2012.  ^ "Ex-Heat star Mourning buys Pinecrest house". Daily Business Review. October 23, 2012. (Registration required (help)).  ^ Miami
Miami
Herald article Archived August 26, 2011, at the Wayback Machine. ^ Clary, Mike (July 21, 2011). "Suit targets Ex-Heat Alonzo Mourning, claiming he left crash victim too soon". The Palm Beach Post. Retrieved October 14, 2015.  ^ Anderson, Curt (July 20, 2011). "Ex-Heat star Mourning sued over traffic crash". Deseret News. Retrieved June 17, 2012. 

http://crosarka.com/ External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Alonzo Mourning.

Career statistics and player information from Basketball-Reference.com " Alonzo Mourning
Alonzo Mourning
Charities". Archived from the original on April 24, 2012. Retrieved 2009-01-06. CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link) Mourning's acceptance speech for the 2015 Strong Men & Women in Virginia History event on YouTube

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draft

First round

Shaquille O'Neal Alonzo Mourning Christian Laettner Jim Jackson LaPhonso Ellis Tom Gugliotta Walt Williams Todd Day Clarence Weatherspoon Adam Keefe Robert Horry Harold Miner Bryant Stith Malik Sealy Anthony Peeler Randy Woods Doug Christie Tracy Murray Don MacLean Hubert Davis Jon Barry Oliver Miller Lee Mayberry Latrell Sprewell Elmore Spencer Dave Johnson Byron Houston

Second round

Marlon Maxey P. J. Brown Sean Rooks Reggie Smith Brent Price Corey Williams Chris Smith Tony Bennett Duane Cooper Isaiah Morris Elmer Bennett Litterial Green Steve Rogers Popeye Jones Matt Geiger Predrag Danilović Henry Williams Chris King Robert Werdann Darren Morningstar Brian Davis Ron Ellis Matt Fish Tim Burroughs Matt Steigenga Curtis Blair Brett Roberts

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NBA
NBA
season blocks leaders

1974: Smith 1975: Abdul-Jabbar 1976: Abdul-Jabbar 1977: Walton 1978: Johnson 1979: Abdul-Jabbar 1980: Abdul-Jabbar 1981: Johnson 1982: Johnson 1983: Rollins 1984: Eaton 1985: Eaton 1986: Bol 1987: Eaton 1988: Eaton 1989: Bol 1990: Olajuwon 1991: Olajuwon 1992: Robinson 1993: Olajuwon 1994: Mutombo 1995: Mutombo 1996: Mutombo 1997: Bradley 1998: Camby 1999: Mourning 2000: Mourning 2001: Ratliff 2002: Wallace 2003: Ratliff 2004: Ratliff 2005: Kirilenko 2006: Camby 2007: Camby 2008: Camby 2009: Howard 2010: Howard 2011: Bogut 2012: Ibaka 2013: Ibaka 2014: Davis 2015: Davis 2016: Whiteside 2017: Gobert

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Charlotte Hornets

Founded in 1988 Formerly the Charlotte Bobcats (2004–14) Based in Charlotte, North Carolina

Franchise

History Seasons 1988 Expansion Draft 2004 Expansion Draft Draft history All-time roster Head coaches Accomplishments Broadcasters Current season

Arenas

Charlotte Coliseum Spectrum Center

Administration

Owner Michael Jordan President of Basketball
Basketball
Operations Rod Higgins General Manager Buzz Peterson
Buzz Peterson
(interim)

General Managers

Scheer Bass Bickerstaff Higgins Cho Peterson (interim)

G League affiliate

Greensboro Swarm

Retired numbers

13

Hall of Famers

Robert Parish Alonzo Mourning Dave Cowens Larry Brown

Culture and lore

Buzz City George Shinn Hugo Charlotte Honey Bees "Grandmama" "Zo"

NBA
NBA
Playoff Appearances (10)

1993 1995 1997 1998 2000 2001 2002 2010 2014 2016

Media

TV Fox Sports Carolinas Fox Sports Southeast Radio WFNZ Announcers Eric Collins Dell Curry Stephanie Ready Steve Martin

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Miami
Miami
Heat

Founded in 1988 Based in Miami, Florida

Franchise

Franchise Team history Expansion Draft All-time roster Draft history Seasons Records Broadcasters Head coaches Current season

Arenas

Miami
Miami
Arena American Airlines Arena

G League affiliates

Florida Flame Arkansas RimRockers Albuquerque Thunderbirds Sioux Falls Skyforce

General managers

Schaffel Wohl Pfund Riley Elisburg

NBA
NBA
Championships (3)

2006 2012 2013

Eastern Conference Championships (5)

2006 2011 2012 2013 2014

Culture and lore

Micky Arison Pat Riley Michael Baiamonte Burnie "The Heat Is On" (Glenn Frey song) Shaq The Decision The Big Three 27 in a row The Shot

Retired numbers

10 23 32 33

Rivals

Chicago Bulls New York Knicks

Media

TV Fox Sports Sun Radio 790 The Ticket Announcers Eric Reid Tony Fiorentino Jason Jackson Mike Inglis

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Miami Heat
Miami Heat
2005–06 NBA
NBA
champions

3 Wade (Finals MVP) 5 D. Anderson 8 Walker 20 Payton 24 Kapono 25 Simien 32 O'Neal 33 Mourning 40 Haslem 42 Posey 49 S. Anderson 51 Doleac 55 Williams

Head coach Riley

Assistant coaches Spoelstra McAdoo Rothstein Askins Coles

Regular season Playoffs

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United States men's basketball squad – 1990 Goodwill Games – Silver medal

Anderson Day Gatling Hurley Laettner Mayberry Mourning Owens Randall C. Smith D. Smith Stith Weatherspoon Williams Coach: Krzyzewski

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United States squad – 1990 FIBA World Championship
1990 FIBA World Championship
– Bronze medal

4 D. Smith 5 Randall 6 Mayberry 7 Williams 8 C. Smith 9 Anderson 10 Stith 11 Day 12 Gatling 13 Laettner 14 Owens 15 Mourning Coach: Krzyzewski

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United States squad – 1994 FIBA World Championship
1994 FIBA World Championship
– Gold medal

4 Dumars 5 Price 6 Coleman 7 Kemp 8 Smith 9 Majerle 10 Miller 11 K. Johnson 12 Wilkins 13 O'Neal (MVP) 14 Mourning 15 L. Johnson Coach: Nelson

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United States men's basketball squad – 2000 Summer Olympics
2000 Summer Olympics
– Gold medal

4 Smith 5 Kidd 6 Houston 7 Mourning 8 Hardaway 9 Carter 10 Garnett 11 Baker 12 Allen 13 McDyess 14 Payton 15 Abdur-Rahim Coach: Tomjanovich

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USA Basketball
Basketball
Male Athlete of the Year

1980: Thomas 1981: Boyle 1982: Rivers 1983: Jordan 1984: Jordan & Perkins 1985: Person 1986: Robinson 1987: Manning 1988: Majerle 1989: Johnson 1990: Mourning 1991: Laettner 1992: U.S. Olympic team 1993: Finley 1994: O'Neal 1995: Allen 1996: Pippen 1997: Boykins 1998: Brand 1999: Payton 2000: Mourning 2001: Duhon 2002: Miller 2003: Duncan 2004: May & Paul 2005: Williams 2006: Anthony 2007: Kidd 2008: U.S. Olympic team 2009: McAdoo 2010: Durant 2011: Parker 2012: James 2013: Gordon 2014: Irving 2015: Brunson 2016: Anthony & Durant 2017: Warney

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1990 NCAA Men's Basketball
Basketball
Consensus All-Americans

First Team

Derrick Coleman Chris Jackson Larry Johnson Gary Payton Lionel Simmons

Second Team

Hank Gathers Kendall Gill Bo Kimble Alonzo Mourning Rumeal Robinson Dennis Scott Doug Smith

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1992 NCAA Men's Basketball
Basketball
Consensus All-Americans

First Team

Jim Jackson Christian Laettner Harold Miner Alonzo Mourning Shaquille O'Neal

Second Team

Byron Houston Don MacLean Anthony Peeler Malik Sealy Walt Williams

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NCAA Division I men's basketball season blocks leaders

1986: Robinson 1987: Robinson 1988: Blake 1989: Mourning 1990: Green 1991: Bradley 1992: O'Neal 1993: Ratliff 1994: Livingston 1995: Closs 1996: Closs 1997: Foyle 1998: J. James 1999: Williams 2000: Johnson 2001: Williams 2002: Myrda 2003: Okafor 2004: Ferguson 2005: Gai 2006: S. James 2007: Gladness 2008: Varnado 2009: Varnado 2010: Whiteside 2011: Mosley 2012: Davis 2013: Obekpa 2014: Bachynski 2015: Mickey 2016: Fernandez 2017: Thomas 2018: Penava

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NABC Defensive Player of the Year
NABC Defensive Player of the Year
Award winners

1987: Amaker 1988: King 1989: Augmon 1990: Augmon 1991: Augmon 1992: Mourning 1993: Hill 1994: McIlvaine 1995: Duncan 1996: Duncan 1997: Duncan 1998: Wojciehowski 1999: Battier 2000: Battier & Martin 2001: Battier 2002: Linehan 2003: Okafor 2004: Okafor 2005: Williams 2006: Williams 2007: Oden 2008: Thabeet 2009: Thabeet 2010: Varnado 2011: Faried 2012: Davis 2013: Oladipo & Withey 2014: Craft 2015: Cauley-Stein 2016: Brogdon 2017: Carter 2018: Carter

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Big East Conference
Big East Conference
Men's Basketball
Basketball
Player of the Year

1980: Duren 1981: Bagley 1982: Callandrillo 1983: Mullin 1984: Ewing & Mullin 1985: Ewing & Mullin 1986: Berry 1987: Williams 1988: C. D. Smith 1989: C. E. Smith 1990: Coleman 1991: Owens 1992: Mourning 1993: Dehere 1994: Marshall 1995: Kittles 1996: Allen 1997: Garrity 1998: Hamilton 1999: Hamilton & James 2000: Murphy 2001: Bell & Murphy 2002: Butler & Knight 2003: Bell 2004: Okafor 2005: Warrick 2006: Foye 2007: Green 2008: Harangody 2009: Blair & Thabeet 2010: Johnson 2011: Hansbrough 2012: Crowder 2013: Porter 2014: McDermott 2015: Arcidiacono & Dunn 2016: Dunn 2017: Hart 2018: Brunson

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NBA
NBA
Defensive Player of the Year Award

1983: Moncrief 1984: Moncrief 1985: Eaton 1986: Robertson 1987: Cooper 1988: Jordan 1989: Eaton 1990: Rodman 1991: Rodman 1992: Robinson 1993: Olajuwon 1994: Olajuwon 1995: Mutombo 1996: Payton 1997: Mutombo 1998: Mutombo 1999: Mourning 2000: Mourning 2001: Mutombo 2002: Wallace 2003: Wallace 2004: Artest 2005: Wallace 2006: Wallace 2007: Camby 2008: Garnett 2009: Howard 2010: Howard 2011: Howard 2012: Chandler 2013: Gasol 2014: Noah 2015: Leonard 2016: Leonard 2017: Green

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J. Walter Kennedy Citizenship Award

1975: Unseld 1976: Watts 1977: Bing 1978: Lanier 1979: Murphy 1980: Carr 1981: Glenn 1982: Benson 1983: Erving 1984: Layden 1985: Issel 1986: Cooper & Sparrow 1987: Thomas 1988: English 1989: Bailey 1990: Rivers 1991: K. Johnson 1992: M. Johnson 1993: Porter 1994: Dumars 1995: O'Toole 1996: Dudley 1997: Brown 1998: Smith 1999: Grant 2000: Divac 2001: Mutombo 2002: Mourning 2003: Robinson 2004: Miller 2005: Snow 2006: Garnett 2007: Nash 2008: Billups 2009: Mutombo 2010: Dalembert 2011: Artest 2012: Gasol 2013: Faried 2014: Deng 2015: Noah 2016: Ellington 2017: James

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Mr. Basketball
Basketball
USA winners

1955: Chamberlain 1956: Robertson 1957: Lucas 1958: Lucas 1959: Raftery 1960: Hawkins 1961: Bradley 1962: Russell 1963: Lacy 1964: Alcindor 1965: Alcindor 1966: Murphy 1967: Haywood 1968: Westphal 1969: McGinnis 1970: McMillen 1971: Lucas 1972: Buckner 1973: Dantley 1974: Malone 1975: Cartwright 1976: Griffith 1977: King 1978: Aguirre 1979: Kellogg 1980: Rivers 1981: Ewing 1982: Tisdale 1983: R. Williams 1984: J. Williams 1985: Ferry 1986: Reid 1987: Johnson 1988: Mourning 1989: Anderson 1990: Bailey 1991: Webber 1992: Kidd 1993: Wallace 1994: Lopez 1995: Garnett 1996: Bibby 1997: McGrady 1998: Lewis 1999: Bender 2000: Miles 2001: Wagner 2002: James 2003: James 2004: Telfair 2005: Ellis 2006: Oden 2007: Mayo 2008: Jennings 2009: Favors 2010: Barnes 2011: Kidd-Gilchrist 2012: Muhammad 2013: Wiggins 2014: Alexander 2015: Simmons 2016: Ball 2017: Porter

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Naismith Prep Player of the Year Award

1987: Scott 1988: Mourning 1989: Anderson 1990: Bailey 1991: Webber 1992: Kidd 1993: Livingston 1994: Ward 1995: Mercer 1996: Bryant 1997: Battier 1998: Harrington 1999: Harvey 2000: Wallace 2001: Wagner 2002: Felton 2003: James 2004: Howard 2005: Williams 2006: Oden 2007: Love 2008: Jennings 2009: Favors 2010: Sullinger 2011: Rivers 2012: Muhammad 2013: Wiggins 2014: Alexander 2015: Simmons 2016: Ball 2017: Porter 2018: Barrett

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USA Today High School Boys' Basketball
Basketball
Player of the Year Award

1983: Williams 1984: Brooks 1985: Ferry 1986: Reid 1987: Liberty 1988: Mourning 1989: Anderson 1990: Bailey 1991: Webber 1992: Kidd 1993: Wallace 1994: Lopez 1995: Garnett 1996: Bryant 1997: McGrady 1998: Harrington 1999: Harvey 2000: Wallace 2001: Wagner 2002: James 2003: James 2004: Howard 2005: Oden 2006: Oden 2007: Love 2008: Samuels 2009: Favors 2010: Barnes 2011: Rivers 2012: Noel 2013: Wiggins 2014: Okafor 2015: Simmons 2016: Ball 2017: Porter

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Gatorade High School Basketball
Basketball
Player of the Year Award

Boys

1986: J. R. Reid 1987: LaBradford Smith 1988: Alonzo Mourning 1989: Kenny Anderson 1990: Damon Bailey 1991: Chris Webber 1992: Corliss Williamson 1993: Randy Livingston 1994: Felipe Lopez 1995: Stephon Marbury 1996: Kobe Bryant 1997: Baron Davis 1998: Al Harrington 1999: LaVell Blanchard 2000: Jared Jeffries 2001: Kelvin Torbert 2002: LeBron James 2003: LeBron James 2004: Dwight Howard 2005: Greg Oden 2006: Greg Oden 2007: Kevin Love 2008: Jrue Holiday 2009: Brandon Knight 2010: Brandon Knight 2011: Bradley Beal 2012: Jabari Parker 2013: Andrew Wiggins 2014: Karl-Anthony Towns 2015: Ben Simmons 2016: Jayson Tatum 2017: Michael Porter 2018: R. J. Barrett

Girls

1986: Susan Anderson 1987: Kris Durham 1988: Vicki Hall 1989: Lisa Harrison 1990: Lisa Leslie 1991: Michelle Marciniak 1992: Katie Smith 1993: La'Keshia Frett 1994: Monick Foote 1995: Stephanie White 1996: Jamie Walz 1997: Nikki Teasley 1998: Tamika Williams 1999: Nicole Kaczmarski 2000: Shereka Wright 2001: Shyra Ely 2002: Ann Strother 2003: Candace Parker 2004: Candace Parker 2005: Abby Waner 2006: Tina Charles 2007: Maya Moore 2008: Nneka Ogwumike 2009: Skylar Diggins 2010: Chiney Ogwumike 2011: Kaleena Mosqueda-Lewis 2012: Breanna Stewart 2013: Mercedes Russell 2014: Brianna Turner 2015: Katie Lou Samuelson 2016: Erin Boley 2017: Megan Walker 2018: Christyn Williams

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McDonald's All-American Game – Boys' MVPs

1979: Daye 1980: Cross 1981: Branch & Sherrod 1982: Winters 1983: Bennett 1984: Williams 1985: Lambiotte 1986: Reid 1987: Macon 1988: Mourning & Owens 1989: Hurley & O'Neal 1990: Bradley 1991: Webber & Brunson 1992: Harrington 1993: Vaughn & Stackhouse 1994: López 1995: Garnett 1996: Holloway 1997: Gregory 1998: R. Curry 1999: Bender 2000: Randolph 2001: E. Curry 2002: Redick 2003: James 2004: Howard & Smith 2005: McRoberts 2006: Budinger & Durant 2007: Beasley 2008: Evans 2009: Favors 2010: Barnes & Sullinger 2011: Gilchrist & McAdoo 2012: Muhammad 2013: Gordon 2014: Ju. Jackson & Okafor 2015: Diallo 2016: F. Jackson & Jo. Jackson 2017: Porter 2018: Little

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