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Alan Stuart Franken (born May 21, 1951) is an American comedian, writer, producer, author, and politician who served as a United States Senator from Minnesota
Minnesota
from 2009 to 2018. He became well known in the 1970s and 1980s as a performer on the television comedy show Saturday Night Live (SNL). After decades as a comedic actor and writer, he became a prominent liberal political activist, hosting The Al Franken Show on Air America Radio. Franken was first elected to the United States Senate
United States Senate
in 2008 as the nominee of the Minnesota
Minnesota
Democratic–Farmer–Labor Party (DFL, an affiliate of the Democratic Party), defeating incumbent Republican Senator Norm Coleman
Norm Coleman
by 312 votes out of nearly three million cast. He won reelection in 2014 with 53.2% of the vote over Republican challenger Mike McFadden. Franken resigned on January 2, 2018, after several allegations of sexual misconduct were made against him.

Contents

1 Early life and education 2 Saturday Night Live 3 Post-SNL 4 Political activism prior to election 5 U.S. Senate

5.1 2008 elections 5.2 2014 elections 5.3 Tenure 5.4 Sexual misconduct allegations

5.4.1 Resignation

5.5 Committee assignments

6 Personal life 7 Works 8 Filmography 9 Electoral history

9.1 2008 9.2 2014

10 See also 11 Notes 12 References 13 External links

Early life and education[edit] Franken was born on May 21, 1951, in New York City, to Joseph Franken, a printing salesman, and Phoebe Franken (born Kunst), a real estate agent. His paternal grandparents emigrated from Germany; his maternal grandfather came from Grodno, Russian Empire; and his maternal grandmother's parents were also from the Russian Empire.[1] Both of his parents were Jews, and Franken was raised in a Reform Jewish home.[2] The Frankens moved to Albert Lea, Minnesota, when he was four years old.[3] His father opened a quilting factory, but it failed after just two years. The family then moved to St. Louis Park, Minnesota, a suburb of Minneapolis.[4] Franken graduated from The Blake School in 1969, where he was a member of the wrestling team.[5] He attended Harvard
Harvard
College, where he majored in political science, graduating cum laude with a Bachelor of Arts in 1973.[6] His older brother Owen is a photojournalist, and his cousin Bob is a journalist for MSNBC.[7] Franken began performing in high school, where he and his longtime friend and writing partner Tom Davis were known for their comedy.[8] The duo first performed on stage at Minneapolis's Brave New Workshop theater, specializing in political satire.[9] They soon found themselves in what was described as "a life of near-total failure on the fringes of show business in Los Angeles."[10] Saturday Night Live[edit] Franken and Tom Davis were recruited as two of the original writers and occasional performers on Saturday Night Live
Saturday Night Live
(SNL) (1975–1980, 1985–1995). In SNL's first season, the two apprentice writers shared a salary of $350 per week.[8] Franken received seven Emmy nominations and three awards for his television writing and producing while creating such characters as self-help guru Stuart Smalley. Another routine proclaimed the 1980s the Al Franken
Al Franken
Decade.[11] Franken and Davis wrote the script of the 1986 comedy film One More Saturday Night, appearing in it as rock singers in a band called Bad Mouth. They also had minor roles in All You Need Is Cash
All You Need Is Cash
and the film Trading Places, starring Eddie Murphy
Eddie Murphy
and Dan Aykroyd
Dan Aykroyd
. On Weekend Update near the end of Season 5, Franken delivered a commentary called "A Limo for a Lame-O". He mocked controversial NBC president Fred Silverman as "a total unequivocal failure" and displayed a chart showing the poor ratings of NBC
NBC
programs. As a result of this sketch, Silverman declined Lorne Michaels's recommendation that Franken succeed him as producer, and Franken left the show when Michaels did, at the end of the 1979–80 season.[12] Franken returned to the show in 1985 as a writer and occasional performer. He has acknowledged using cocaine and other illegal drugs while working in television, and stated that he stopped after John Belushi died of an overdose.[13][14] In 1995, Franken left the show in protest over losing the role of Weekend Update anchor to Norm Macdonald.[15] Post-SNL[edit] Main articles: Fox v. Franken
Fox v. Franken
and The Al Franken
Al Franken
Show

Franken entertaining troops at Ramstein Air Base
Ramstein Air Base
in December 2000

In 1995, Franken wrote and starred in the film Stuart Saves His Family, which was based on his SNL character Stuart Smalley. The film was a critical and commercial failure, and Franken later became depressed as a result.[16][17] Despite its aggregate rating of 30% on Rotten Tomatoes,[18] the film received favorable reviews from The Washington Post[19] and Gene Siskel.[20] Franken is the author of four books that made The New York Times
The New York Times
Best Seller list.[21] In 2003, Penguin Books
Penguin Books
published his Lies and the Lying Liars Who Tell Them: A Fair and Balanced Look at the Right, a satirical book on American politics and conservatism. The book's title incorporated the Fox News
Fox News
slogan "Fair and Balanced", and had a cover photo of Fox News
Fox News
commentator Bill O'Reilly; that August, Fox News sued, claiming infringement of its registered trademark phrase.[22][23] A federal judge found the lawsuit "wholly without merit." The incident focused media attention on Franken's book and, according to him, greatly increased its sales.[24][25] The publicity resulting from the lawsuit propelled Franken's yet-to-be-released book to number 1 on Amazon.com.[26] Franken signed a one-year contract in early 2004 to host a talk show for Air America Radio's flagship program with co-host Katherine Lanpher, who remained with the show until October 2005. The network was launched on March 31, 2004. Originally named The O'Franken Factor but renamed The Al Franken Show
The Al Franken Show
on July 12, 2004, the show aired three hours a day, five days a week for three years. Its stated goal was to put more progressive views on the public airwaves to counter what Franken perceived as the dominance of conservative syndicated commentary on the radio: "I'm doing this because I want to use my energies to get Bush unelected," he told a New York Times reporter in 2004.[27] Franken's last radio show on Air America Radio
Air America Radio
was on February 14, 2007, at the end of which he announced his candidacy for the United States Senate.[28] Franken also co-wrote the film When a Man Loves a Woman, co-created and starred in the NBC
NBC
sitcom LateLine, and appeared in the 2004 remake of The Manchurian Candidate. In 2003, Franken served as a Fellow at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government at the Joan Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy.[11] Since 2005, he has been a contributor to The Huffington Post.[29] Franken toured Iraq
Iraq
several times with the United Service Organizations (USO).[30] On March 25, 2009, he was presented with the USO
USO
Metro Merit Award for his 10 years of involvement with the organization.[31][32] Political activism prior to election[edit]

Franken with Senator Paul Simon
Paul Simon
in 1991

According to an article by Richard Corliss
Richard Corliss
published in Time magazine, "In a way, Franken has been running for office since the late '70s." Corliss also hinted at Franken's "possibly ironic role as a relentless self-promoter" in proclaiming the 1980s "The Al Franken
Al Franken
Decade" and saying, "Vote for me, Al Franken. You'll be glad you did!"[33] In 1999, Franken released a parody book, Why Not Me?, detailing his hypothetical campaign for president in 2000. He had been a strong supporter of Minnesota
Minnesota
Senator Paul Wellstone
Paul Wellstone
and was deeply affected by Wellstone's death in a plane crash shortly before the 2002 election. Wellstone was a mentor[34][35] and political and personal role model for Franken, who stated his hopes of following in Wellstone's footsteps.[36][37] Franken said he learned that 21% of Americans received most of their news from talk radio, an almost exclusively conservative medium.[33] "I didn't want to sit on the sidelines, and I believed Air America could make a difference", he said.[33] In November 2003, Franken talked about moving back to his home state of Minnesota
Minnesota
to run for the Senate. At the time the seat once held by Wellstone was occupied by Republican Norm Coleman. At a 2004 Democratic presidential campaign event, Franken tackled a man who was allegedly threatening other attendees and heckling Governor Howard Dean.[38][39] In 2005, Franken announced his move to Minnesota: "I can tell you honestly, I don't know if I'm going to run, but I'm doing the stuff I need to do in order to do it."[40] In late 2005, he started his own political action committee, Midwest Values PAC. By early 2007, the PAC had raised more than $1 million.[41][42] Franken was the subject of the 2006 documentary film Al Franken: God Spoke, which The New York Times
The New York Times
called "an investigation of the phenomenon of ideological celebrity."[43] Franken initially supported the Iraq
Iraq
War but opposed the 2007 troop surge. In an interview with MSNBC's Joe Scarborough,[44] he said that he "believed Colin Powell", whose presentation at the United Nations convinced him that the war was necessary, but that he had since come to believe that "we were misled into the war" and urged the Democratic-controlled Congress to refuse to pass appropriations bills to fund the war if they did not include timetables for leaving Iraq. In an interview with Josh Marshall, Franken said of the Democrats, "I think we've gotta make President George W. Bush
George W. Bush
say, 'OK, I'm cutting off funding because I won't agree to a timetable.'"[45] Franken favors transitioning to a universal health care system,[46] with the provision that every child in America should receive health care coverage immediately. He objects to efforts to privatize Social Security or cut benefits, and favors raising the cap on wages to which Social Security taxes apply.[47] On his 2008 campaign website, he voiced support for cutting subsidies for oil companies, increasing money available for college students, and cutting interest rates on student loans.[48][49] During the 2008 election, New York state officials asserted that Al Franken Inc. had failed to carry required workers compensation insurance for employees who assisted him with his comedy and public speaking from 2002 to 2005. Franken paid a $25,000 fine to the state of New York upon being advised his corporation was out of compliance with the state's workers compensation laws.[50] At the same time, the California Franchise Tax Board
California Franchise Tax Board
reported that the same corporation owed more than $4,743 in taxes, fines, and associated penalties in the state of California for 2003 through 2007, because the corporation did not file tax returns in the state for those years.[51] A Franken representative said that it followed the advice of an accountant who believed when the corporation stopped doing business in California that no further filing was required.[52] Subsequently, Franken paid $70,000 in back income taxes in 17 states dating back to 2003, mostly from his speeches and other paid appearances. Franken said he paid the income tax in his state of residence, and he would seek retroactive credit for paying the taxes in the wrong state.[53] U.S. Senate[edit] 2008 elections[edit] Main article: United States Senate
United States Senate
election in Minnesota, 2008

Franken campaigning for the U.S. Senate in 2008

On January 29, 2007, Franken announced his departure from Air America Radio,[28] and on the day of his final show, February 14, he formally announced his candidacy for the United States Senate
United States Senate
from Minnesota
Minnesota
in 2008.[54] Challenging him for the Democratic–Farmer–Labor Party endorsement was Jack Nelson-Pallmeyer, a professor, author, and activist; trial lawyer Mike Ciresi; and attorney and human rights activist Jim Cohen, who dropped out of the race early.[55] Franken won the nomination with 65% of the vote. On July 8, 2007, Franken's campaign stated that it expected to announce that he had raised more money than his Republican opponent, Norm Coleman, during the second quarter of the year, taking in $1.9 million to Coleman's $1.6 million,[56][57] although in early July 2007, Coleman's $3.8 million cash on hand exceeded Franken's $2 million.[57] In late May 2008, the Minnesota
Minnesota
Republican Party released a letter about an article Franken had written for Playboy
Playboy
magazine in 2000 titled "Porn-O-Rama!" The letter, signed by six prominent GOP women, including a state senator and state representative, called on Franken to apologize for what they called a "demeaning and degrading" article.[58] His campaign spokesman responded, "Al had a long career as a satirist. But he understands the difference between what you say as a satirist and what you do as a senator. And as a Senator, Norm Coleman has disrespected the people of Minnesota
Minnesota
by putting the Exxons and Halliburtons ahead of working families. And there's nothing funny about that."[58] On June 7, 2008, Franken was endorsed by the DFL.[59] In a July 2008 interview with CNN, he was endorsed by Ben Stein, a noted entertainer, speechwriter, lawyer and author known for his conservative views, who generally supported Republican candidates.[60] Stein said of Franken, "He is my pal, and he is a really, really capable smart guy. I don't agree with all of his positions, but he is a very impressive guy, and I think he should be in the Senate." During his campaign, Franken was criticized for advising SNL creator Lorne Michaels
Lorne Michaels
on a political sketch ridiculing Senator John McCain's ads attacking Barack Obama
Barack Obama
in the 2008 presidential election.[61] Coleman's campaign reacted, saying, "Once again, he proves he's more interested in entertainment than service, and ridiculing those with whom he disagrees."[62] Preliminary reports on election night, November 4, were that Coleman was leading by over 700 votes, but the official results, certified on November 18, 2008, had Coleman leading by only 215 votes. As the two candidates were separated by less than 0.5 percent of the votes cast, the Minnesota
Minnesota
Secretary of State, Mark Ritchie, authorized the automatic recount provided for in Minnesota
Minnesota
election law. In the recount, ballots and certifying materials were examined by hand, and candidates could file challenges to the legality of ballots or materials for inclusion or exclusion. On January 5, 2009, the Minnesota
Minnesota
State Canvassing Board certified the recounted vote totals, with Franken ahead by 225 votes.[63] On January 6, 2009, Coleman's campaign filed an election contest, which led to a trial before a three-judge panel.[64] The trial ended on April 7, when the panel ruled that 351 of 387 disputed absentee ballots were incorrectly rejected and ordered them counted. Counting those ballots raised Franken's lead to 312 votes. Coleman appealed to the Minnesota
Minnesota
Supreme Court on April 20.[65][66][67] On April 24, the Minnesota
Minnesota
Supreme Court agreed to hear the case.[68][69] Oral arguments were conducted on June 1.[68][70] On June 30, 2009, the Minnesota
Minnesota
Supreme Court unanimously rejected Coleman's appeal and said that Franken was entitled to be certified as the winner. Shortly after the court's decision, Coleman conceded.[71] Governor Tim Pawlenty
Tim Pawlenty
signed Franken's election certificate that same evening.[72] 2014 elections[edit] Main article: United States Senate
United States Senate
election in Minnesota, 2014 Franken was reelected to a second term in 2014. He won the August 12 primary election, in which he was challenged by Sandra Henningsgard, with 94.5% of the vote.[73] He won the general election against the Republican candidate, Mike McFadden, with 53.2% of the vote.[74][75] Tenure[edit]

Franken meeting with Vice President Joe Biden
Joe Biden
in May 2009

Franken was sworn into the Senate on July 7, 2009, 246 days after the election.[76][77] He took the oath of office with the Bible
Bible
of late Minnesota
Minnesota
Senator Paul Wellstone, whose old seat was set aside for Franken by Senate leaders.[78][79] On August 6, 2009, Franken presided over the confirmation vote of Sonia Sotomayor
Sonia Sotomayor
to be an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court.[80] On August 5, 2010, Franken presided over the confirmation vote of Elena Kagan. His first piece of legislation, the Service Dogs for Veterans
Veterans
Act, which he wrote jointly with Republican Senator Johnny Isakson, passed the Senate by unanimous consent, establishing a program with the United States Department of Veterans Affairs to pair disabled veterans with service dogs.[81]

2009 official portrait

A video of Franken at the Minnesota
Minnesota
State Fair on September 2, 2009, engaging in a discussion with a group of Tea Party protesters on health care reform, began circulating on the Internet and soon went viral.[82][83] The discussion was noted for its civility, in contrast to the explosive character of several other discussions between members of the 111th Congress
111th Congress
and their constituents that had occurred over the summer.[82][84][85] During the debate on health care reform, Franken was one of the strongest supporters of a single-payer system.[86] He authored an amendment to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act
Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act
called the Medical Loss Ratio, which required that insurance companies spend at least 80% of premiums on actual health care costs, rising to 85% for large group plans.[87] On September 30, 2013, Franken voted to remove a provision that would repeal the medical device tax in Obamacare
Obamacare
from a government funding bill,[88][89] saying that though he supported the provision, he disagreed with its being used as a condition for preventing the 2013 federal government shutdown.[90] Citing the case of Jamie Leigh Jones, Franken introduced a limit to the arbitration policy of the 2010 Defense Appropriations bill that withheld defense contracts from companies that restrict their employees from taking workplace sexual assault, battery, and discrimination cases to court. It passed the Senate in November 2010, 68 to 30, in a roll-call vote.[91] [92]

Franken in 2017

In May 2010, Franken proposed a financial-reform amendment that created a board to select which credit rating agency would evaluate a given security. At the time, any company issuing a security could select the company that evaluated the security.[93] The amendment was passed, but the financial industry lobbied to have it removed from the final bill.[94] Negotiations between the Senate and House, whose version of financial reform did not include such a provision, resulted in the amendment's being watered down to require only a series of studies being done on the issue for two years.[95] After the studies, if the Securities and Exchange Commission
Securities and Exchange Commission
had not implemented another solution to the conflict-of-interest problem, Franken's solution would go into effect.[96][97] In August 2010, Franken made faces and hand gestures and rolled his eyes while Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell
Mitch McConnell
delivered a speech in opposition to the confirmation of Elena Kagan
Elena Kagan
to the U.S. Supreme Court.[98][99][100] Franken's actions prompted McConnell to remark, "This isn't Saturday Night Live, Al."[100] After Kagan's confirmation, Franken delivered a handwritten apology to McConnell and issued a public statement saying that McConnell had a right "to give his speech with the presiding officer just listening respectfully."[98] The National Journal
National Journal
reported in 2013 that Franken supports the National Security Agency's data mining programs, believing they have saved lives, and that "I can assure you, this is not about spying on the American people."[101] When Franken declared his intention to seek reelection in 2014,[102] his seat was thought to be a top target for the Republicans because of his very slim margin of victory in the previous election. But Politico reported that his high approval rating, his large campaign fund, and the Republicans' struggle to find a top-tier candidate meant he was a "heavy favorite" to win reelection,[103] and Franken won the race comfortably. The Associated Press
Associated Press
has noted that contrary to expectations, Franken has not sought out the media spotlight: "He rarely talks to the Washington press corps, has shed his comedic persona and focused on policy, working to be taken seriously."[104] In interviews he has expressed his desire to be known for a focus on constituency work, keeping his head down, and working hard.[86][105] Franken has been an effective fundraiser for the Democrats.[106][107][108] By late 2015, his political action committee had raised more than $5 million in donations.[108] In 2016, his PAC raised $3.3 million.[107][109] According to The Star Tribune, Franken has been able to "draw crowds and donations across the country".[106] Sexual misconduct allegations[edit] See also: 2017–18 United States political sexual scandals On November 16, 2017, Leeann Tweeden
Leeann Tweeden
alleged in a blog post and an interview with her radio station, 790 KABC, that Franken forcibly kissed her on a 2006 USO
USO
tour during a rehearsal for a skit. She wrote, "I said 'OK' so he would stop badgering me. We did the line leading up to the kiss and then he came at me, put his hand on the back of my head, mashed his lips against mine and aggressively stuck his tongue in my mouth."[110] She said she pushed him away, feeling "disgusted and violated".[110] Franken was also photographed appearing to place his hands above or on her breasts while she was asleep on an aircraft wearing body armor and a helmet.[111][112] In response, Franken said, "I certainly don't remember the rehearsal for the skit in the same way, but I send my sincerest apologies to Leeann ... As to the photo, it was clearly intended to be funny but wasn't. I shouldn't have done it."[113] A few hours later, Franken issued a longer apology,[114] which Tweeden accepted.[115] On November 20, 2017, a 33-year-old woman named Lindsay Menz accused Franken of touching her clothed buttocks while they posed for a photo at the Minnesota
Minnesota
State Fair in 2010.[116] In a statement responding to the allegation, Franken said, "I take thousands of photos at the state fair surrounded by hundreds of people, and I certainly don't remember taking this picture. I feel badly that Ms. Menz came away from our interaction feeling disrespected."[117] On November 22, 2017, Huffington Post reported that two additional women who insisted upon anonymity said that Franken had subjected them to very similar misconduct during political events in 2007 and 2008 (before he took office), incidents Franken also said he did not remember.[118] Franken issued another apology on November 23, 2017, stating, "I've met tens of thousands of people and taken thousands of photographs, often in crowded and chaotic situations. I'm a warm person; I hug people. I've learned from recent stories that in some of those encounters, I crossed a line for some women — and I know that any number is too many."[119] On November 30, 2017, Jezebel reported that another anonymous woman said that after she was a guest on Franken's radio show in 2006, Franken leaned in toward her face during a handshake and gave her "a wet, open-mouthed kiss" on the cheek when she turned away.[120][121] That same day, an army veteran named Stephanie Kemplin told CNN
CNN
that Franken held the side of her breast for 5 to 10 seconds "and never moved his hand" while posing for a photograph[122] with her during a 2003 USO
USO
tour in Iraq.[123] Senate Majority and Minority Leaders Mitch McConnell
Mitch McConnell
and Chuck Schumer sent Tweeden's accusations to the Senate Ethics Committee for review, a decision supported by members of both parties, including Franken himself.[112] On November 30, the committee announced that it was investigating allegations against Franken.[124][125] Some liberal groups and commentators, including the Indivisible movement
Indivisible movement
and Sally Kohn, called on Franken to resign because of the allegations.[126] On December 6, two more accusations surfaced, one from an anonymous congressional aide about an attempted kiss at his radio show studio,[127] and one by congressional aide Tina Dupuy about Franken allegedly squeezing her waist at a party prior to Franken taking office.[128] More than two dozen Democratic senators then called on Franken to resign from office.[129] Resignation[edit] On December 7, 2017, Franken announced his intention to resign his Senate seat.[130] In his resignation speech, he made comparisons to Republican politicians, saying he was "aware of the irony" that President Donald Trump remained in office despite the comments Trump made in the Access Hollywood tape released a month before his election, and that the Republican Party supported Roy Moore's Senate campaign despite the many allegations of harassment and molestation against Moore.[131] Franken resigned on January 2, 2018, and Minnesota governor Mark Dayton
Mark Dayton
appointed the lieutenant governor, Tina Smith, to hold Franken’s seat until a special election in November 2018.[132] Committee assignments[edit]

Committee on Energy and Natural Resources

Subcommittee on Energy Subcommittee on Public Lands, Forests and Mining Subcommittee on Water and Power

Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions

Subcommittee on Children and Families Subcommittee on Employment and Workplace Safety (Ranking Member)

Committee on Indian Affairs Committee on the Judiciary

Subcommittee on Administrative Oversight and the Courts Subcommittee on Antitrust, Competition Policy and Consumer Rights Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights and Human Rights Subcommittee on Privacy, Technology, and the Law (Ranking Member)

Personal life[edit] Franken met his wife, Franni Bryson, in his first year at Harvard. In 2005, they moved to Minneapolis, Minnesota.[133] Together they have two children. Their daughter, Thomasin,[4] has degrees from Harvard and the French Culinary Institute; she is the director of extended learning at DC Prep, an organization in Washington, D.C., that manages charter schools.[134] Their son, Joseph, works in the finance industry.[4] Franken is a second cousin of the actor Steve Franken, known for his appearances in the television series The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis.[135] In 2013, Franken received the Stewart B. McKinney Award for his work fighting homelessness.[136] Works[edit] The following are works authored by Al Franken.

Rush Limbaugh Is a Big Fat Idiot and Other Observations
Rush Limbaugh Is a Big Fat Idiot and Other Observations
(Delacorte Press, 1996) ISBN 0-385-31474-4 Why Not Me?: The Inside Story of the Making and Unmaking of the Franken Presidency (Delacorte Press, 1999) ISBN 0-385-31809-X Oh, the Things I Know!: A Guide to Success, or Failing That, Happiness (Plume Books, 2003) ISBN 0-452-28450-3 Lies and the Lying Liars Who Tell Them: A Fair and Balanced Look at the Right (Dutton Books, 2003) ISBN 0-525-94764-7 The Truth (With Jokes)
The Truth (With Jokes)
(Dutton Books, 2005) ISBN 0-525-94906-2 Al Franken, Giant of the Senate (Grand Central Publishing, 2017) ISBN 1455540412

Filmography[edit]

Year Work Writer Actor Cameo Notes

1976 Tunnel Vision

Yes

Role: Al

1977–1980 Saturday Night Live Yes Yes Yes

1977 The Paul Simon
Paul Simon
Special Yes

1978 All You Need is Cash

Yes

Role: Extra

1981 Grateful Dead: Dead Ahead Yes

Concert video Role: Host

1981 Steve Martin's Best Show Ever Yes

1981 Bob and Ray, Jane, Laraine and Gilda Yes

1981 The Coneheads Yes

1983 Trading Places

Yes

Role: Baggage handler

1984 Franken and Davis at Stockton State Yes

1984 The New Show Yes

1986 Saturday Night Live Yes Yes Yes

1986 One More Saturday Night Yes Yes

Role: Paul Flum

1988–1995 Saturday Night Live Yes Yes Yes

1994 When a Man Loves a Woman Yes

1995 Stuart Saves His Family Yes Yes

Role: Stuart Smalley

1997 3rd Rock from the Sun

Yes

Episode: "Dick the Vote"

1997 The Larry Sanders Show

Yes Episode: "The Roast"

1998-1999 LateLine Yes Yes Yes

1998 From the Earth to the Moon

Yes

TV miniseries Role: Jerome Wiesner

2002 Harvard
Harvard
Man

Yes

2004 Outfoxed

Yes

Role: Air America host

2004 The Manchurian Candidate

Yes

2004–2007 The Al Franken
Al Franken
Show Yes Yes

Host of radio talk show

2004 Tanner on Tanner

Yes

2006 Al Franken: God Spoke

Yes Documentary

2011 Hot Coffee

Yes Documentary

Electoral history[edit] 2008[edit]

Wikinews has related news: Minnesota
Minnesota
court declares Franken winner; Coleman considers appeal

2008 Minnesota
Minnesota
U.S. Senate Democratic–Farmer–Labor primary election

Party Candidate Votes %

DFL Al Franken 164,136 65.34%

DFL Priscilla Lord Faris 74,655 29.72%

DFL "Dick" Franson 3,923 1.56%

DFL Bob Larson 3,152 1.25%

DFL Rob Fitzgerald 3,095 1.23%

DFL Ole Savior 1,227 0.49%

DFL Alve Erickson 1,017 0.40%

2008 Minnesota
Minnesota
U.S. Senate election[137][138]

Party Candidate Votes %

DFL Al Franken 1,212,629 41.994%

Republican Norm Coleman
Norm Coleman
(incumbent) 1,212,317 41.983%

Independence Dean Barkley 437,505 15.151%

Libertarian Charles Aldrich 13,923 0.482%

Constitution James Niemackl 8,907 0.308%

Write-ins

2,365 0.082%

Margin of victory 312 0.011%

Total votes 2,887,646 100

2014[edit]

2014 Minnesota
Minnesota
U.S. Senate Democratic–Farmer–Labor primary election

Party Candidate Votes %

DFL Al Franken
Al Franken
(incumbent) 182,720 94.50%

DFL Sandra Henningsgard 10,627 5.50%

2014 Minnesota
Minnesota
U.S. Senate election[139]

Party Candidate Votes %

DFL Al Franken
Al Franken
(incumbent) 1,053,205 53.15

Republican Mike McFadden 850,227 42.91

Independence Steve Carlson 47,530 2.4

Libertarian Heather Johnson 29,685 1.5

Write-ins Others 881 0.04

Margin of victory 202,978 10.24%

Total votes 1,981,528 100

DFL hold

See also[edit]

Saturday Night Live
Saturday Night Live
cast members List of Jewish members of the United States Congress

Notes[edit]

^ Franken was elected to the term beginning January 3, 2009, but did not take his seat until July 7, 2009, because of a recount and a subsequent election challenge. He then resigned on January 2, 2018.

References[edit]

^ "Ancestry of Al Franken". William Addams Reitwiesner. Archived from the original on March 8, 2015. Retrieved September 7, 2014.  ^ "Al Franken". Jewish Virtual Library. Archived from the original on February 10, 2017. Retrieved February 12, 2017.  ^ "Meet Al". Archived from the original on September 11, 2015.  ^ a b c Colapinto, John. "Enter Laughing". The New Yorker. Archived from the original on October 19, 2012. Retrieved January 9, 2013.  ^ Liebovich, Mark (December 13, 2016). " Al Franken
Al Franken
Faces Donald Trump and the Next Four Years". The New York Times. Archived from the original on December 13, 2016. Retrieved December 13, 2016. At 65, Franken retains the thick build of the high-school wrestler he once was.  ^ White, Deborah. "Profile of Sen. Al Franken
Al Franken
of Minnesota". About.com. Archived from the original on December 7, 2008. Retrieved January 30, 2009.  ^ " CNN
CNN
Newsnight Aaron Brown". CNN. April 29, 2002. Archived from the original on April 20, 2008. Retrieved November 5, 2008.  ^ a b Martin, Douglas (July 19, 2012). "Tom Davis, Comedian and 'SNL' Sketch Writer, Dies at 59". The New York Times. Archived from the original on November 12, 2012. Retrieved January 12, 2013.  ^ Davis, Tom (2010). Thirty-Nine Years of Short-Term Memory Loss: The Early Days of SNL from Someone Who Was There. Grove Press; Reprint edition. p. 29. ISBN 978-0-8021-4456-0.  ^ Hill, Doug; Weingrad, Jeff (1987). Saturday Night: A Backstage History of Saturday Night Live
Saturday Night Live
p. 57. Vintage Books. ISBN 0-394-75053-5. ^ a b Kornbluth, Jesse (March–April 2012). "Al Franken: You Can Call Me Senator". Harvard
Harvard
Magazine. Archived from the original on September 26, 2012. Retrieved September 26, 2012.  ^ Shales, Tom (2003). Live From New York: An Uncensored History of Saturday Night Live, as Told by Its Stars, Writers and Guests. p. 191. Back Bay Books. ISBN 0-316-73565-5. ^ Cox, Ana Marie (April 5, 2007). "Don't Laugh at Al Franken". Time. Archived from the original on September 19, 2007. Retrieved August 19, 2007.  ^ Westfall, Sandra Sobieraj (May 26, 2017). " Al Franken
Al Franken
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Al Franken
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Leeann Tweeden
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Al Franken
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External links[edit]

Find more aboutAl Frankenat's sister projects

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Party political offices

Preceded by Walter Mondale Democratic nominee for U.S. Senator from Minnesota (Class 2) 2008, 2014 Most recent

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Preceded by Norm Coleman U.S. Senator (Class 2) from Minnesota 2009–2018 Served alongside: Amy Klobuchar Succeeded by Tina Smith

Links to related articles

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Al Franken

Bibliography

I'm Good Enough, I'm Smart Enough, and Doggone It, People Like Me! (1992) Rush Limbaugh Is a Big Fat Idiot and Other Observations
Rush Limbaugh Is a Big Fat Idiot and Other Observations
(1996) Why Not Me? (1999) Oh, the Things I Know!
Oh, the Things I Know!
(2003) Lies and the Lying Liars Who Tell Them
Lies and the Lying Liars Who Tell Them
(2003) The Truth (with Jokes)
The Truth (with Jokes)
(2005) Al Franken, Giant of the Senate (2017)

Political career

2017 United States political sexual scandals Employee Free Choice Act Medical Loss Ratio Midwest Values PAC Student Non-Discrimination Act 2008 U.S. Senate election 2014 U.S. Senate election Weinstein effect

See also

The Al Franken
Al Franken
Show

Air America Radio

Saturday Night Live Stuart Smalley Stuart Saves His Family When A Man Loves a Woman (1994 film, co-writer) LateLine Al Franken: God Spoke (2006 documentary) Fox v. Franken Minnesota
Minnesota
Democratic–Farmer–Labor Party

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Programs

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Show Clout Doin' Time with Ron Kuby EcoTalk Go Vegan The Lionel Show The Marc Maron Show The Majority Report Marc Sussman's Money Message The Mark Riley Show The Mike Malloy Show Morning Sedition Montel Across America On the Real The Rachel Maddow Show RadioNation The Randi Rhodes Show The Ron Reagan
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Show Ring of Fire 7 Days in America Springer on the Radio State of Belief The Steve Earle Show This Is America with Jon Elliott The Time Is Now Unfiltered The Young Turks

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Primetime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Writing for a Variety Series (1970–79)

1970–1973

Gary Belkin, Peter Bellwood, Thomas Meehan, Herb Sargent and Judith Viorst (1970) Herbert Baker, Hal Goodman, Larry Klein, Bob Schiller, Norman Steinberg, Bob Weiskopf and Flip Wilson
Flip Wilson
/ Bob Ellison and Marty Farrell (1971) Art Baer, Roger Beatty, Stan Burns, Stan Hart, Don Hinkley, Ben Joelson, Woody Kling, Mike Marmer, Arnie Rosen and Larry Siegel
Larry Siegel
/ Anne Howard Bailey (1972) Bill Angelos, Roger Beatty, Stan Hart, Robert Hilliard, Woody Kling, Arnie Kogen, Buz Kohan, Gail Parent, Tom Patchett, Larry Siegel
Larry Siegel
and Jay Tarses / Joseph Bologna
Joseph Bologna
and Renee Taylor (1973)

1974–1978

Specials

Rosalyn Drexler, Ann Elder, Karyl Geld Miller, Robert Illes, Lorne Michaels, Richard Pryor, Jim Rusk, Herb Sargent, James R. Stein, Lily Tomlin, Jane Wagner, Rod Warren and George Yanok (1974) John Bradford, Cy Coleman
Cy Coleman
and Bob Wells (1975) Ann Elder, Christopher Guest, Lorne Michaels, Earl Pomerantz, Jim Rusk, Lily Tomlin, Jane Wagner, Rod Warren and George Yanok (1976) Buz Kohan and Ted Strauss (1977) Chevy Chase, Tom Davis, Al Franken, Charles Grodin, Lorne Michaels, Paul Simon, Lily Tomlin
Lily Tomlin
and Alan Zweibel
Alan Zweibel
(1978)

Series

Roger Beatty, Gary Belkin, Dick Clair, Rudy De Luca, Arnie Kogen, Barry Harman, Barry Levinson, Jenna McMahon, Gene Perret, Bill Richmond and Ed Simmons (1974) Roger Beatty, Gary Belkin, Dick Clair, Rudy De Luca, Arnie Kogen, Barry Levinson, Jenna McMahon, Gene Perret, Bill Richmond and Ed Simmons (1975) Anne Beatts, Chevy Chase, Tom Davis, Al Franken, Lorne Michaels, Marilyn Suzanne Miller, Michael O'Donoghue, Herb Sargent, Tom Schiller, Rosie Shuster and Alan Zweibel
Alan Zweibel
(1976) Dan Aykroyd, John Belushi, Tom Davis, James Downey, Al Franken, Lorne Michaels, Marilyn Suzanne Miller, Bill Murray, Michael O'Donoghue, Herb Sargent, Tom Schiller, Rosie Shuster and Alan Zweibel
Alan Zweibel
(1977) Roger Beatty, Dick Clair, Tim Conway, Rick Hawkins, Robert Illes, Jenna McMahon, Gene Perret, Bill Richmond, Liz Sage, Larry Siegel, Franelle Silver, Ed Simmons and James Stein (1978)

1979

Alan Alda
Alan Alda
(1979)

Complete list (1957–1969) (1970–1979) (1980–1989) (1990–1999) (2000–2009) (2010–2019)

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Primetime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Writing for a Variety Series (1980–89)

Buz Kohan (1980) Jerry Juhl, Chris Langham and David Odell (1981) Jeffrey Barron, Dick Blasucci, John Candy, Chris Cluess, Bob Dolman, Joe Flaherty, Paul Flaherty, Stuart Kreisman, Eugene Levy, Andrea Martin, John McAndrew, Brian McConnachie, Rick Moranis, Catherine O'Hara, Mert Rich, Michael Short, Doug Steckler and Dave Thomas (1982) Dick Blasucci, John Candy, Bob Dolman, Joe Flaherty, Paul Flaherty, Eugene Levy, Andrea Martin, John McAndrew, Martin Short, Michael Short, Doug Steckler and Mary Charlotte Wilcox (1983) Chris Elliott, Sanford Frank, Ted Greenberg, David Letterman, Merrill Markoe, Jeff Martin, Gerard Mulligan, Steve O'Donnell, Joe Toplyn, Matt Wickline and David Yazbek (1984) Randy Cohen, Kevin Curran, Chris Elliott, Sandy Frank, Eddie Gorodetsky, Fred Graver, Larry Jacobson, David Letterman, Merrill Markoe, Jeff Martin, Gerard Mulligan, Joe Toplyn and Matt Wickline (1985) Randy Cohen, Kevin Curran, Chris Elliott, Sandy Frank, Fred Graver, Larry Jacobson, David Letterman, Merrill Markoe, Jeff Martin, Gerard Mulligan, Steve O'Donnell, Joe Toplyn and Matt Wickline (1986) Randy Cohen, Kevin Curran, Chris Elliott, Sandy Frank, Fred Graver, Larry Jacobson, David Letterman, Jeff Martin, Gerard Mulligan, Steve O'Donnell, Adam Resnick, Joe Toplyn and Matt Wickline (1987) Jackie Mason
Jackie Mason
(1988) John Bowman, A. Whitney Brown, Greg Daniels, Tom Davis, James Downey, Al Franken, Shannon Gaughan, Jack Handey, Phil Hartman, George Meyer, Lorne Michaels, Mike Myers, Conan O'Brien, Bob Odenkirk, Herb Sargent, Tom Schiller, Robert Smigel, Bonnie Turner, Terry Turner and Christine Zander (1989)

Complete list (1957–1969) (1970–1979) (1980–1989) (1990–1999) (2000–2009) (2010–2019)

v t e

Grammy Award for Best Spoken Word Album

1959−1980

Stan Freberg
Stan Freberg
– The Best of the Stan Freberg
Stan Freberg
Shows (1959) Carl Sandburg
Carl Sandburg
Lincoln Portrait (1960) Robert Bialek (producer) – FDR Speaks (1961) Leonard Bernstein
Leonard Bernstein
– Humor in Music (1962) Charles Laughton
Charles Laughton
– The Story-Teller: A Session With Charles Laughton (1963) Edward Albee
Edward Albee
(playwright) – Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
(1964) That Was the Week That Was
That Was the Week That Was
– BBC Tribute to John F. Kennedy (1965) Goddard Lieberson
Goddard Lieberson
(producer) – John F. Kennedy - As We Remember Him (1966) Edward R. Murrow
Edward R. Murrow
Edward R. Murrow
Edward R. Murrow
- A Reporter Remembers, Vol. I The War Years (1967) Everett Dirksen
Everett Dirksen
– Gallant Men (1968) Rod McKuen
Rod McKuen
– Lonesome Cities (1969) Art Linkletter
Art Linkletter
& Diane Linkletter – We Love You Call Collect (1970) Martin Luther King Jr.
Martin Luther King Jr.
– Why I Oppose the War in Vietnam (1971) Les Crane
Les Crane
– Desiderata (1972) Bruce Botnick (producer) – Lenny performed by the original Broadway cast (1973) Richard Harris
Richard Harris
Jonathan Livingston Seagull (1974) Peter Cook
Peter Cook
and Dudley Moore
Dudley Moore
– Good Evening (1975) James Whitmore
James Whitmore
Give 'em Hell, Harry!
Give 'em Hell, Harry!
(1976) Henry Fonda, Helen Hayes, James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
and Orson Welles
Orson Welles
- Great American Documents (1977) Julie Harris – The Belle of Amherst
The Belle of Amherst
(1978) Orson Welles
Orson Welles
Citizen Kane
Citizen Kane
Original Motion Picture Soundtrack (1979) John Gielgud
John Gielgud
– Ages of Man - Readings From Shakespeare
Shakespeare
(1980)

1981−2000

Pat Carroll – Gertrude Stein, Gertrude Stein, Gertrude Stein
Gertrude Stein
(1981) Orson Welles
Orson Welles
Donovan's Brain
Donovan's Brain
(1982) Tom Voegeli (producer) – Raiders of the Lost Ark
Raiders of the Lost Ark
- The Movie on Record performed by Various Artists (1983) William Warfield
William Warfield
Lincoln Portrait (1984) Ben Kingsley
Ben Kingsley
– The Words of Gandhi (1985) Mike Berniker (producer) & the original Broadway cast – Ma Rainey's Black Bottom (1986) Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis, Chips Moman, Ricky Nelson, Roy Orbison, Carl Perkins
Carl Perkins
and Sam Phillips
Sam Phillips
– Interviews From the Class of '55 Recording Sessions (1987) Garrison Keillor
Garrison Keillor
Lake Wobegon Days (1988) Jesse Jackson
Jesse Jackson
– Speech by Rev. Jesse Jackson
Jesse Jackson
(1989) Gilda Radner
Gilda Radner
– It's Always Something (1990) George Burns
George Burns
– Gracie: A Love Story (1991) Ken Burns
Ken Burns
– The Civil War (1992) Earvin "Magic" Johnson and Robert O'Keefe – What You Can Do to Avoid AIDS (1993) Maya Angelou
Maya Angelou
On the Pulse of Morning
On the Pulse of Morning
(1994) Henry Rollins
Henry Rollins
– Get in the Van (1995) Maya Angelou
Maya Angelou
– Phenomenal Woman (1996) Hillary Clinton
Hillary Clinton
It Takes a Village (1997) Charles Kuralt
Charles Kuralt
– Charles Kuralt's Spring (1998) Christopher Reeve
Christopher Reeve
Still Me
Still Me
(1999) LeVar Burton
LeVar Burton
– The Autobiography of Martin Luther King Jr.
Martin Luther King Jr.
(2000)

2001−present

Sidney Poitier, Rick Harris & John Runnette (producers) – The Measure of a Man: A Spiritual Autobiography (2001) Quincy Jones, Jeffrey S. Thomas, Steven Strassman (engineers) and Elisa Shokoff (producer) – Q: The Autobiography of Quincy Jones (2002) Maya Angelou
Maya Angelou
and Charles B. Potter (producer) – A Song Flung Up to Heaven / Robin Williams, Nathaniel Kunkel (engineer/mixer) and Peter Asher (producer) – Live 2002 (2003) Al Franken
Al Franken
and Paul Ruben (producer) – Lies and the Lying Liars Who Tell Them (2004) Bill Clinton
Bill Clinton
– My Life (2005) Barack Obama
Barack Obama
Dreams from My Father
Dreams from My Father
(2006) Jimmy Carter
Jimmy Carter
– Our Endangered Values: America's Moral Crisis / Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee
Ruby Dee
- With Ossie and Ruby (2007) Barack Obama
Barack Obama
and Jacob Bronstein (producer) – The Audacity of Hope (2008) Beau Bridges, Cynthia Nixon
Cynthia Nixon
and Blair Underwood
Blair Underwood
– An Inconvenient Truth by Al Gore
Al Gore
(2009) Michael J. Fox
Michael J. Fox
– Always Looking Up (2010) Jon Stewart
Jon Stewart
– The Daily Show with Jon Stewart
Jon Stewart
Presents Earth (The Audiobook) (2011) Betty White
Betty White
– If You Ask Me (And Of Course You Won't) (2012) Janis Ian
Janis Ian
– Society's Child (2013) Stephen Colbert
Stephen Colbert
– America Again: Re-becoming The Greatness We Never Weren't (2014) Joan Rivers
Joan Rivers
– Diary of a Mad Diva (2015) Jimmy Carter
Jimmy Carter
– A Full Life: Reflections at 90 (2016) Carol Burnett
Carol Burnett
– In Such Good Company: Eleven Years of Laughter, Mayhem, and Fun in the Sandbox (2017) Carrie Fisher
Carrie Fisher
The Princess Diarist
The Princess Diarist
(2018)

v t e

United States Senators from Minnesota

Class 1

Rice Ramsey McMillan Davis Towne Clapp Kellogg Shipstead Thye McCarthy H. Humphrey M. Humphrey Durenberger Grams Dayton Klobuchar

Class 2

Shields Wilkinson Norton Windom Stearns Windom Edgerton Windom Sabin Washburn K. Nelson Johnson Schall Benson Howard Lundeen Ball A. Nelson Ball H. Humphrey Mondale Anderson Boschwitz Wellstone Barkley Coleman Franken Smith

v t e

Minnesota's delegation(s) to the 111th–115th United States Congresses (ordered by seniority)

111th Senate: A. Klobuchar A. Franken House: J. Oberstar C. Peterson B. McCollum J. Kline T. Walz K. Ellison M. Bachmann E. Paulsen

112th Senate: A. Klobuchar A. Franken House: C. Peterson B. McCollum J. Kline T. Walz K. Ellison M. Bachmann E. Paulsen C. Cravaack

113th Senate: A. Klobuchar A. Franken House: C. Peterson B. McCollum J. Kline T. Walz K. Ellison M. Bachmann E. Paulsen R. Nolan

114th Senate: A. Klobuchar A. Franken House: C. Peterson B. McCollum J. Kline T. Walz K. Ellison E. Paulsen R. Nolan T. Emmer

115th Senate: A. Klobuchar A. Franken (until Jan. 2018) T. Smith (from Jan. 2018) House: C. Peterson B. McCollum T. Walz K. Ellison E. Paulsen R. Nolan T. Emmer J. Lewis

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 86425630 LCCN: no93004145 ISNI: 0000 0001 1681 9289 GND: 128790385 SUDOC: 076507386 BNF: cb14043100j (data) MusicBrainz: b0a3dda1-2cc0-404e-a26d-cdb3f302eb41 NLA: 40034595 NKC: xx0095182 US Congress: F000

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