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Air New Zealand
New Zealand
Limited (NZX: AIR) is the flag carrier airline of New Zealand. Based in Auckland, the airline operates scheduled passenger flights to 20 domestic and 31 international destinations in 19 countries around the Pacific Rim
Pacific Rim
and the United Kingdom.[6] The airline has been a member of the Star Alliance
Star Alliance
since 1999.[7] Air New Zealand
New Zealand
originated in 1940 as Tasman Empire Airways
Tasman Empire Airways
Limited (TEAL), a company operating trans-Tasman flights between New Zealand and Australia. TEAL
TEAL
became wholly owned by the New Zealand
New Zealand
government in 1965, whereupon it was renamed Air New Zealand. The airline served international routes until 1978, when the government merged it and the domestic New Zealand
New Zealand
National Airways Corporation (NAC) into a single airline under the Air New Zealand
New Zealand
name. Air New Zealand
New Zealand
was privatised in 1989, but returned to majority government ownership in 2001 after near bankruptcy due to a failed tie up with Australian carrier Ansett Australia. In the 2015 financial year to June, Air New Zealand
New Zealand
carried 14.29 million passengers.[8] Air New Zealand's route network focuses on Australasia
Australasia
and the South Pacific, with long-haul services to eastern Asia, the Americas and the United Kingdom. It was the last airline to circumnavigate the world with flights to Heathrow via both Los Angeles and via Hong Kong. The latter ended in March 2013 when Air New Zealand
New Zealand
stopped Hong Kong – London flights, in favour of a codeshare agreement with Cathay Pacific.[9][10] The airline's main hub is Auckland
Auckland
Airport, located near Mangere
Mangere
in the southern part of the Auckland
Auckland
urban area.[11] Air New Zealand
New Zealand
is headquartered in a building called "The Hub", located 20 km (12 mi) from Auckland
Auckland
Airport, in Auckland's Wynyard Quarter.[12] Air New Zealand
New Zealand
currently operates a fleet of Airbus
Airbus
A320, Boeing 777 and Boeing 787 aircraft. Air New Zealand's regional subsidiaries, Air Nelson and Mount Cook Airline, operate additional domestic services using turboprop aircraft. Air New Zealand
New Zealand
was awarded Airline of the Year in 2010[13] and 2012[14] by the Air Transport World Global Airline Awards. In 2014, Air New Zealand
New Zealand
was ranked the safest airline in the world by JACDEC.[15]

Contents

1 History

1.1 Merger with Ansett 1.2 21st century

2 Corporate affairs and identity

2.1 Head office 2.2 Subsidiaries

2.2.1 Operations subsidiaries 2.2.2 Technical subsidiaries

2.3 Sponsorships 2.4 Brand
Brand
and livery

2.4.1 Special
Special
liveries

3 Destinations

3.1 Codeshare agreements

4 Fleet 5 Cabin

5.1 Long-haul international

5.1.1 Business Premier 5.1.2 Premium Economy 5.1.3 Economy 5.1.4 Economy SkyCouch 5.1.5 In-flight entertainment
In-flight entertainment
and magazine

5.2 Tasman and Pacific 5.3 Domestic

6 Services

6.1 Air New Zealand
New Zealand
Lounge 6.2 Airpoints

7 Incidents and accidents 8 Controversies

8.1 Outsourcing maintenance 8.2 Minor seating policy 8.3 Qantas
Qantas
code-share

9 Alternative propulsion 10 See also 11 References 12 External links

History[edit]

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A Douglas DC-8
Douglas DC-8
at Sydney Airport
Sydney Airport
in the early 1970s. Air New Zealand was an early operator of the DC-8. Note the pre-1973 livery with the Southern Cross on the tail.

Deliveries of McDonnell Douglas DC-10s to Air New Zealand
New Zealand
began in 1973; they were the first of the airline's aircraft to feature the now ubiquitous koru logo.

Main article: History of Air New Zealand Air New Zealand
New Zealand
began as TEAL
TEAL
( Tasman Empire Airways
Tasman Empire Airways
Limited) in 1940, operating Short Empire
Short Empire
flying boats on trans-Tasman routes. Following World War II, TEAL
TEAL
operated weekly flights from Auckland
Auckland
to Sydney, and added Wellington
Wellington
and Fiji
Fiji
to its routings. The New Zealand
New Zealand
and Australian governments purchased 50% stakes in TEAL
TEAL
in 1953,[16] and the airline ended flying boat operations in favour of land-based turboprop airliners by 1960. In 1965, TEAL
TEAL
became Air New Zealand—the New Zealand
New Zealand
government having purchased Australia's 50% stake in the carrier.[16] With the increased range of the Douglas DC-8s the airline's first jet aircraft, Air New Zealand
New Zealand
began transpacific services to the United States and Asia
Asia
with Los Angeles and Honolulu added as destinations in 1965. The airline further acquired wide-body McDonnell Douglas DC-10 airliners in 1973. The DC-10s introduced the new koru-inspired logo for the airline, which remains to this day. In 1978, the domestic airline National Airways Corporation (NAC) and its subsidiary Safe Air were merged into Air New Zealand
New Zealand
to form a single national airline, further expanding the carrier's operations. As a result, NAC's Boeing 737
Boeing 737
and Fokker F27
Fokker F27
aircraft joined Air New Zealand's fleet alongside its DC-8 and DC-10 airliners. The merger also resulted in the airline having two IATA airline designators: TE from Air New Zealand
New Zealand
and NZ from NAC. TE continued to be used for international flights and NZ for domestic flights until 1990, when international flights assumed the NZ code.[16] In 1981, Air New Zealand
New Zealand
introduced its first Boeing 747
Boeing 747
airliner, and a year later initiated service to London via Los Angeles. The five 747-200s owned by Air New Zealand
New Zealand
were all named after ancestral Maori canoes. 1985 saw the introduction of Boeing 767-200ER airliners to fill the large size gap between the Boeing 737
Boeing 737
and 747 (the DC-8 and DC-10 had been withdrawn by 1983). In 1989 the airline was privatised with a sale to a consortium headed by Brierley Investments Ltd.[16] (with remaining stakes held by Qantas, Japan
Japan
Airlines, American Airlines, and the New Zealand
New Zealand
government). The New Zealand
New Zealand
air transport market underwent deregulation in 1990, prompting Air New Zealand to acquire a 50% stake in Ansett Australia
Ansett Australia
in 1995. In March 1999, Air New Zealand
New Zealand
became a member of the Star Alliance. From 1999 through 2000, Air New Zealand
New Zealand
became embroiled in an ownership battle over Ansett with co-owner News Limited
News Limited
over a possible sale of the under-performing carrier to Singapore Airlines.[17] Merger with Ansett[edit] Further information: History of Air New Zealand
New Zealand
§ Ansett collapse In 2000, Air New Zealand
New Zealand
announced that it had chosen instead to acquire the entirety of Ansett Australia
Ansett Australia
(increasing its 50% stake in the carrier to 100%) for A$680 million from News Corporation Ltd. Business commentators[18][19] believe this to have been a critical mistake, as Ansett's fleet, staffing levels and infrastructure far outweighed that of Air New Zealand. Subsequently, both carriers' profitability came under question, and foreign offers to purchase the Air New Zealand
New Zealand
Group were considered. In September 2001, plagued by costs it could not possibly afford, the Air New Zealand
New Zealand
/ Ansett Group neared collapse. A failed attempt at purchasing Virgin Blue was the final straw, and on 12 September, out of both time and cash, Air New Zealand placed Ansett Australia
Ansett Australia
into voluntary administration, following which Ansett was forced to cease operations. Air New Zealand announced a NZ$1.425 billion operating loss.[16] 21st century[edit]

Air New Zealand
New Zealand
added the Boeing 777
Boeing 777
to its fleet in 2004. As of 2014, the 777-200ER and the larger -300ER formed the core of the airline's long-haul fleet.

In October 2001, Air New Zealand
New Zealand
was re-nationalised under a New Zealand government NZ$885 million rescue plan (with the government taking an 82% stake), and subsequently received new leadership.[20] This act was the only thing that spared Air New Zealand
New Zealand
from also going into administration, without which it too would likely would have been grounded. In 2002, Air New Zealand
New Zealand
reconfigured its domestic operations under a low-cost airline business plan, and the New Zealand
New Zealand
government weighed (and later refused) a proposal from Qantas
Qantas
to purchase a one-fifth stake in the carrier. Air New Zealand
New Zealand
returned to profitability in 2003, reporting a net profit of $NZ165.7 million for that year. The carrier saw increasing profits through 2004 and 2005.[16] In 2004, the airline announced a comprehensive relaunch of its long-haul product, featuring the introduction of new seats in its business, premium economy, and economy class cabins. In 2003, Air New Zealand
New Zealand
added the Airbus A320
Airbus A320
airliner to its fleet for use on short-haul international flights. In 2005, the airline received its first Boeing 777
Boeing 777
aircraft (–200ER variant), and placed orders for the Boeing 787 Dreamliner
Boeing 787 Dreamliner
in 2004. The airline later was announced as the launch customer for the -9 variant of the 787.[21] On 21 December 2010, the New Zealand
New Zealand
government approved an alliance between Air New Zealand
New Zealand
and Australian airline Virgin Blue (now named Virgin Australia), which allowed both airlines to expand operations between Australia and New Zealand
New Zealand
with codeshares for trans-Tasman and connecting domestic flights; and reciprocal access to frequent flyer programmes and airport lounges. Air New Zealand
New Zealand
subsequently purchased a 26% shareholding in Virgin Australia
Virgin Australia
Holdings (Virgin Australia's parent company) to cement the relationship. By October 2016 Air New Zealand sold its remaining stake in Virgin Australia
Virgin Australia
to investors and the Nasham Group.[22] On 4 April 2018, Air New Zealand
New Zealand
ended its partnership with Virgin Australia
Virgin Australia
effective 28 October 2018.[23] In 2011, Air New Zealand
New Zealand
introduced the Boeing 777-300ER
Boeing 777-300ER
airliner, as well as the Economy Skycouch, a set of three economy class seats that could be converted into a flat multi-purpose surface by raising the leg rests. After a four-year delay, Air New Zealand
New Zealand
took delivery of its first Boeing 787-9
Boeing 787-9
on 9 July 2014. On 12 September 2014, the airline withdrew the Boeing 747
Boeing 747
after 33 years of service,[24] leaving Air New Zealand
New Zealand
with a completely twin-engined jet fleet. In November 2013 the New Zealand Government
New Zealand Government
reduced its share in Air New Zealand
New Zealand
from 73% to 53% as part of its controversial asset sales programme. It made $365 million from this deal.[25] Corporate affairs and identity[edit]

"The Hub", Air New Zealand
New Zealand
head office 36°50′42″S 174°45′12″E / 36.84492°S 174.75332°E / -36.84492; 174.75332

Air Nelson
Air Nelson
Saab 340A (no longer operated) at Auckland
Auckland
Airport

Zeal320 logo

Head office[edit] The Air New Zealand
New Zealand
head office, "The Hub," is a 15,600 square metres (168,000 sq ft) office park located at the corner of Beaumont and Fanshawe streets in the Western Reclamation
Western Reclamation
Precinct 2, Auckland
Auckland
City;[26][27] it includes two connected six-level buildings.[27] The facility consists of a lot of glass to allow sunlight and therefore reduce electricity consumption. The building does not have cubicle walls. Lights automatically turn on at 7:30 A.M. and turn off at 6 P.M. Sensors throughout the building can turn on lights if they detect human activity, and turn off lights if human activity is not detected for 15 minutes.[28] The buildings cost $60 million New Zealand
New Zealand
dollars to build and develop. From late September to early October 2006 the airline moved 1,000 employees from four buildings in the Auckland
Auckland
CBD and other buildings elsewhere.[27] The company previously had its head office in the Quay Tower in the CBD.[29] In its history the airline had its head office in Airways House on Customs Street East.[30] Subsidiaries[edit] Operations subsidiaries[edit] The following are operations subsidiaries of Air New Zealand
New Zealand
Limited:

Air New Zealand
New Zealand
Cargo

Air New Zealand
New Zealand
has two wholly owned subsidiary regional airlines – Air Nelson
Air Nelson
and Mount Cook Airline
Mount Cook Airline
– that serve secondary destinations in New Zealand. Together they make up Air New Zealand Link. On 26 August 2016 a third wholly owned subsidiary that operated under the Air New Zealand Link
Air New Zealand Link
brand, Eagle Airways, ceased operations.

Air Nelson
Air Nelson
is based in Nelson, operating Bombardier Q300s. Flight numbers are in the NZ8000 series. Mount Cook Airline
Mount Cook Airline
is based in Christchurch, operating ATR 72-500 and ATR 72-600 turboprop aircraft. Flight numbers are in the NZ5000 series.

Subsidiary company Zeal320 was introduced to help combat increasing labour costs. Zeal320 operated Air New Zealand's trans-Tasman fleet of Airbus
Airbus
A320-200 aircraft under the Air New Zealand
New Zealand
brand. On 31 July 2006, flights were re-numbered to the NZ700-999 series for trans-Tasman services, and NZ1000 series for domestic services. All of Air New Zealand's A320-200s were registered to Zeal320 until 26 November 2008, when ownership of the fleet was transferred back to Air New Zealand. However, staff that worked the A320-200 fleet were still employed by this subsidiary. This was a source of contention within the airline group in which these employees were paid at a lower scale than their mainline counterparts.[31] Continued industrial action by staff employed in this subsidiary during 2009 permanently delayed a proposed low-cost carrier airline as a successor to Freedom Air
Freedom Air
that would have also employed the Airbus A320
Airbus A320
on domestic routes to counter Jetstar Airways, also operating in New Zealand. As of mid-2014, a non-operations company named Zeal320 is registered as active with the New Zealand
New Zealand
Companies Office,[32] but this entity does not employ any crew. Technical subsidiaries[edit] The following are technical operations subsidiaries of Air New Zealand:

Air New Zealand
New Zealand
Engineering Services[33] Christchurch
Christchurch
Engine Centre (50%)

In June 2015, Air New Zealand
New Zealand
confirmed the sale of its Safe Air engineering subsidiary to the Australian arm of Airbus.[34] Sponsorships[edit] Air New Zealand
New Zealand
was the title sponsor of the Air New Zealand
New Zealand
Cup domestic rugby union club competition through the 2009 season.[35] The airline remains a major sponsor of New Zealand
New Zealand
rugby, including the New Zealand
New Zealand
national rugby union team, known as the All Blacks.[36] The airline also sponsors the Air New Zealand
New Zealand
Wine Awards and World of Wearable Arts; and partners with New Zealand's Department of Conservation and Antarctica New Zealand.[37] Brand
Brand
and livery[edit]

Air New Zealand's "Pacific Wave", introduced in 1996

Air New Zealand's koru tail symbol, seen on Boeing 737-300 aircraft ZK-NGM

The Air New Zealand
New Zealand
symbol is a Māori koru, a stylised representation of a silver fern frond unfolding.[38] A redesigned logo was unveiled on 21 March 2006. The "Pacific Wave" fuselage stripes were removed from short-haul aircraft in 2009, simplifying the overall livery, and was in the process of also being removed from long haul aircraft before the logo was changed again.[39] On 27 March 2006, Air New Zealand
New Zealand
embarked on a changeover to a new brand identity, involving a new Zambesi-designed uniform, new logo, new colour scheme and new look check-in counters and lounges. The new uniforms featured a colour palette mirroring the greenstone, teal, schist and slate hues of New Zealand; sea and sky (a Māori motif created by Derek Lardelli) fabric woven from merino wool; and curves inspired by the airline's logo symbol, the koru. A greenstone colour replaces the blue Pacific Wave colour, inspired by the colour of the pounamu, the prized gemstone found in New Zealand. The Air New Zealand Koru
Koru
was woven through all Air New Zealand's signage and products. Later in 2009 staff were involved in testing fabrics and cuts of uniforms. "'It would be fair to say that the lessons from the development and introduction of the current uniform have been taken on board," said the airline's CEO after widespread public and staff criticism.[40] A rebranding was announced in July 2012. Ditching the teal and green colours that had represented the airline since its beginnings as Tasman Empire Airways
Tasman Empire Airways
(TEAL) in 1939, black was adopted as the brand colour in a joint effort between the airline, New Zealand
New Zealand
design agency Designworks and renowned Kiwi typographer Kris Sowersby; as well as a new logo typeface. The tails of the aircraft and the typeface changed to black, while the rest of the fuselage remained white.[citation needed] Then CEO Rob Fyfe
Rob Fyfe
said of the rebranding: "Black has resonated well with our customers and staff who identify with it as the colour of New Zealand and a natural choice for our national airline. It inspires pride, is part of our Kiwi identity and a symbol of Kiwi success on the world stage." The airline began using black as its corporate colour ahead of a sponsorship campaign with NZ's rugby union team, the All Blacks, in 2011.[41] Another new livery was announced on 12 June 2013. In conjunction with a NZ$20 million Memorandum of Understanding with the national tourism agency Tourism New Zealand
New Zealand
for joint marketing, TNZ granted permission for Air New Zealand
New Zealand
to use the " New Zealand
New Zealand
Fern Mark", a standard fern logo used and managed by Tourism NZ and NZ Trade and Enterprise for international promotion, in its livery.[42] Two new liveries were unveiled. The first is predominantly white with a black strip running downwards on the rear fuselage from the tail, adorned with a koru logo in white, to disappear downwards just aft of the junction of the wings with the fuselage. The black and white fern mark adorns the fuselage. This livery is used on most of the fleet. A select number have an all black livery with the fern in silver, including the airline's first Boeing 787-9. Extensive consumer surveys by Air New Zealand
New Zealand
revealed 78 percent people believed the Fern Mark fits with the airline's brand and represents New Zealand.[43] The first aircraft to be painted in this livery was rolled out on 24 September 2013. Special
Special
liveries[edit]

Air New Zealand
New Zealand
747-400 ZK-SUJ in "Airline to Middle Earth" livery

Airbus A320
Airbus A320
ZK-OAB at Auckland
Auckland
wearing the All Blacks livery

Boeing 777-300ER
Boeing 777-300ER
ZK-OKP with "The Airline of Middle-earth" livery at Brisbane Airport

In 1973, the first of the airline's McDonnell Douglas DC-10-30s arrived with 1974 British Commonwealth Games
1974 British Commonwealth Games
"NZ74" logo on both sides of the forward fuselage beneath the cabin windows.[44] In 1984, pictures of the Buckingham Palace
Buckingham Palace
horse guards with 'London, Here We Come' were placed on the side of the hump of the airline's new Boeing 747-200Bs when Air New Zealand
New Zealand
was allowed to fly the Los Angeles – London leg of the trans-Pacific route in its own name. A special livery featuring an image of the All Blacks front row of Carl Hoeft, Anton Oliver and Kees Meeuws and a black tail was used on the Boeing 747-400 aircraft used to transport the team to the 1999 Rugby World Cup. Two other aircraft were wore the special All Blacks scheme: a Boeing 737-200QC and a Saab 340
Saab 340
of Air Nelson; both these aircraft retained their blue teal tail colours.[citation needed] In 1999, one Boeing 737-300 was painted in a 'New Millennium' livery depicting celebrations and the America's Cup
America's Cup
regatta that was to be held in 2000.[citation needed] In 2002 and 2003 Air New Zealand
New Zealand
marked its position as "the official airline to Middle Earth" by decorating three aircraft with The Lord of the Rings imagery, applied as giant decals. The decal material was described in airline publicity as being as thin as clingfilm and weighing more than 60 kilograms (130 lb). The imagery featured actors from the film trilogy The Lord of the Rings against backdrops of New Zealand
New Zealand
locations used in the films.[45][46] In 2008, one of the airline's Boeing 737-300s was painted into a lime green Air New Zealand
New Zealand
'Holidays' livery.[citation needed] During 2011 and 2012, two aircraft – an Airbus A320
Airbus A320
and a Boeing 777-300ER – were painted in an All Blacks-inspired livery. The aircraft were completely black, with a silver fern motif covering the aft section of the fuselage.[47][48] Some Air New Zealand
New Zealand
Link aircraft were also decorated in the scheme: an ATR 72-600 operated by Mount Cook Airline;[49] and two Beechcraft 1900Ds operated by now-defunct subsidiary Eagle Airways.[50] In November 2012, Boeing 777-300ER
Boeing 777-300ER
ZK-OKP was repainted in the new "black-tail" livery and fitted with a 830 m2 (8,900 sq ft) decal promoting the premiere and release of the first film in The Hobbit trilogy. The decal took six days and 400 man-hours to install.[51] In December 2013, ahead of the premiere of the second part of the Hobbit trilogy, The Desolation of Smaug, Air New Zealand
New Zealand
applied two 54-metre long images of the dragon Smaug on the sides of a Boeing 777-300ER.[citation needed]

Destinations[edit] Further information: Air New Zealand
New Zealand
destinations

Air New Zealand destinations (September 2017)

Air New Zealand
New Zealand
and its subsidiaries serves 20 domestic destinations and 31 international destinations in nineteen countries and territories across Asia, Europe, North America, South America
South America
and Oceania. Air New Zealand
New Zealand
serves only five of the domestic destinations; subsidiaries serve the remaining 15 destinations. Air New Zealand
New Zealand
operates five fifth freedom routes (i.e. between two non- New Zealand
New Zealand
destinations), the most notable being the daily Los Angeles – London Heathrow service, operating as an extension of one of its Auckland – Los Angeles services. The airline operates weekly flights from Rarotonga
Rarotonga
to Sydney
Sydney
and Los Angeles, in addition to flights connecting via Auckland.[52] In 2012 – after securing a contract from the Australian government – Air New Zealand
New Zealand
launched twice-weekly services from Sydney
Sydney
and Brisbane to Norfolk Island
Norfolk Island
on its A320 aircraft, complementing its existing direct services from Auckland. The airline also serves eight summer charter destinations in Japan from Auckland.[53] Codeshare agreements[edit] Air New Zealand
New Zealand
has codeshare agreements with the following airlines:[54]

Aerolíneas Argentinas Air Canada Air China Air India Air Rarotonga Air Tahiti
Air Tahiti
Nui Aircalin Alaska Airlines All Nippon Airways Asiana Airlines Cathay Pacific Etihad Airways Fiji
Fiji
Airways Lufthansa SilkAir Singapore Airlines South African Airways Thai Airways Turkish Airlines United Airlines Virgin Atlantic Virgin Australia
Virgin Australia
(ends 27 October 2018)[55]

Fleet[edit] Main article: Air New Zealand
New Zealand
fleet

Air New Zealand's Airbus
Airbus
A320s operate short-haul routes, both domestically and internationally.

Air New Zealand
New Zealand
was the launch customer for the Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner, shown here landing at its launch destination Perth Airport in Australia; the first was delivered to the airline in July 2014.

As of 1 April 2018, Air New Zealand
New Zealand
and its wholly owned subsidiaries operate a total of 105 aircraft. The mainline fleet consists of 56 aircraft: 30 Airbus A320
Airbus A320
jet aircraft for domestic and short-haul international flights, eight Boeing 777-200ER, seven Boeing 777-300ER and eleven Boeing 787-9
Boeing 787-9
Dreamliner jet aircraft for long-haul flights.[56][57][58] Air New Zealand's subsidiaries operate turboprop aircraft on regional domestic services. Two types of aircraft are used, each belonging to a single subsidiary. Mount Cook Airline
Mount Cook Airline
operates 26 ATR 72
ATR 72
aircraft between major cities and towns. The 23 Air Nelson-operated Bombardier Q300s operate other routes alongside Mount Cook Airline, including to some smaller centres. A third subsidiary, Eagle Airways, operated smaller turboprops but ceased operations in 2016. Cabin[edit] Long-haul international[edit]

Boeing 777-200ER
Boeing 777-200ER
cabin with mood lighting

Business Premier flatbed seat

On 28 June 2004, Air New Zealand
New Zealand
released details of the upgrade to its long-haul product, which was aimed to turn around the profitability of its international services. Every seat on its Boeing 747 aircraft was equipped with a personal LCD screen with audio video on demand (AVOD). First class was removed, with an upgraded business class and a new premium economy section installed. In January 2010, Air New Zealand
New Zealand
released details of its new "Kupe" long-haul product for its new 777-300ER aircraft which arrived later that year, as well as on its 787-9 aircraft. Changes included an improved Business Premier and Economy class product, a new Premium Economy cabin, and the introduction of the Economy SkyCouch. Business Premier[edit] Business Premier is the highest available class on Air New Zealand flights, available on both 777 variants and the 787 aircraft. The seating is configured in a herringbone layout in a 1-2-1 configuration on the 777s and 1-1-1 on the 787, allowing direct access for every passenger to an aisle. Each seat is 22 inches (560 mm) wide leather and comes with an ottoman footrest that doubles as a visitor seat. The seat converts to a full length (79.5 in or 2,020 mm) lie-flat bed, for which a pillow, duvet and sheet are provided. Business Premiere cabins can lie flat 6 feet 6 inches i.e. the longest in any airline. Long Haul Business Class: Pitch 79.5 inches Width 22 inches Seat Type Lie Flat, Short Haul Business Class: Pitch 50 inches, Seat Width 22 inches, Seat Type Angle Lie Flat.[59] Each seat comes with a large tray table, multiple stowage bins, a cocktail tray, a bottle holder, in-seat power, three reading lights, and an AVOD system with a 10.4-inch monitor. There is a slightly uprated seat on the 777-300ER and 787-9, with lighter cream leather and purple trimmed seats. The in flight entertainment has also been improved, giving each seat USB and iPod connectivity, and a larger 12.1-inch (777-300ER) or 11.0-inch (787-9) touchscreen monitor.[60] Premium Economy[edit] Premium Economy is in a dedicated cabin, which shares lavatories with the Business Premier cabin, available on the Boeing 777-200ER, Boeing 787-9, and some Boeing 777-300ER
Boeing 777-300ER
aircraft. The class has the same mood lighting, dining and wine selection and in-seat power as the Business Premier cabin. The newly refurbished seats are wider with a 9-inch recline and extendable leg rests with a 2-4-2 configuration on the 777 variants,[61] and a 2-3-2 configuration on the 787-9. Following positive reviews and high demand after its introduction, Air New Zealand re-launched its Premium Economy cabin with added business class services, including priority check-in, priority baggage handling and the same baggage allowance as Business Premier (priority baggage handling and extra baggage allowance do not apply for passengers with connecting flights to other airlines). Seat pitch is approximately 41 in (1,000 mm). Economy[edit]

Economy on 777-300ER

Economy class is available on all aircraft, in a 3-3-3 configuration on the 787, and a 3-4-3 configuration on the 777-200ER and the 777-300ER aircraft. The seats have a pitch of 31 to 34 inches (790 to 860 mm), have a 6-inch recline, and have a flexible edge seat base to provide more leg support when reclined. Each seat has its own AVOD entertainment system, with a 9-inch screen on the 787 and 777-200ER, and a 10.6-inch touchscreen on the 777-300ER. On the various aircraft, economy seats also have USB, iPod and power connections, a cup-holder and trinket tray, and a headrest designed to allow a special sleep pillow to attach to it, preventing it from slipping downwards during sleep. Economy SkyCouch[edit] The Economy SkyCouch is available on the 787-9, 777-200ER and 777-300ER. It is a set of three Economy class seats on the window rows of the cabin that have armrests that retract into the seat back, and full leg rests that individually and manually can be raised to horizontal to form a flat surface extending to the back of the seats in front. It is largely designed for families for use as a flat play surface, and for couples, who on purchasing the middle seat for 25% more each, can use it as a flat sleeping surface.[62][63] Each SkyCouch seat is equipped with the same basic facilities as a standard Economy seat. The Skycouch is only available on routes longer than 6 hours duration; where the aircraft are used on shorter routes, the leg rests are locked out and the Skycouch seats act as regular economy seats. The SkyCouch has earned the nickname "cuddle class" by media reporting on the innovative seating, from the ability for couples to curl up and "cuddle" together on the 74 cm × 155 cm (29 in × 61 in) flat surface.[64][65][66] Concerns were raised almost immediately over the couch potentially being a new way to join the mile high club. Air New Zealand
New Zealand
responded that public displays of affection of that level would not be tolerated in its aircraft.[67] The airline even released a billboard advertisement entitled "The Economy SkyCouch activity guide", suggesting "spoons" (hugs) were allowed, but "forks" (sexual activity) were not.[68] In-flight entertainment
In-flight entertainment
and magazine[edit]

Forward 747-400 Business cabin with personal entertainment

777-300ER bar-style galley with KiaOra screen and tasting area

Air New Zealand
New Zealand
offers audio video on demand in all classes on international services on its aircraft. The AVOD system, branded KiaOra, features multiple channels of video, audio, music, and games. Passengers can start and stop programs, plus rewind and fast-forward as desired. It is a gate-to-gate in-flight entertainment experience: passengers can start their entertainment as soon as they board the aircraft, and continue until they arrive at the gate of their destination, maximising play time, which is especially useful for its short-haul Tasman and Pacific Island flights. Gate-to-gate in-flight entertainment is not available on certain seats in economy (such as the bulkhead and emergency exit row seats). AVOD screen size varies:[69]

Business Premier: 10.4 in (260 mm) Premium Economy: 8.4 in (210 mm) Economy: 8.4 in (210 mm)

KiaOra, the airline's in-flight magazine, was removed from international flights from March 2009. It is now only in seat backs on domestic and trans-Tasman services, however it can still be found in the inflight magazine racks on international flights.[70] As a guide on international services, there is now a brief publication named Entertainment Magazine detailing the entertainment available on the flight, which also contains the buy on board 'in-Bites' menu.[71] Tasman and Pacific[edit] In response to increasing competition from low cost carriers, namely Jetstar Airways, Air New Zealand
New Zealand
replaced its cabin and service on short-haul international routes to Australia ("Tasman") and the Pacific Islands ("Pacific") with a new "Seats to Suit" service in 2010. Introduced on the Christchurch- Sydney
Sydney
route from 18 August 2010, the new service was rolled out on all routes on 17 November 2010. All international Airbus A320
Airbus A320
aircraft were refitted with an all-economy cabin that supports four options of service. Long-haul Boeing 777
Boeing 777
and 787 aircraft also operate on these routes.[72][73]

Business class meal

There are four options, building on each other:

Seat – the basic option, consisting of a seat, one cabin bag up to 7 kg, tea, coffee and water, and AVOD entertainment including TV shows, music and games. Seat + Bag – the Seat option plus one checked bag up to 23 kg. Works – the Seat + Bag option plus movies included on AVOD entertainment, an in-flight meal, non-alcoholic and alcoholic drinks, and the ability to request a specific seat. Children receive a kids activity pack. This option is identical to the previous Economy option. Works Deluxe – the Works option plus priority check-in and baggage, and extra checked bag up to 23 kg, lounge access (where available). On the A320, passengers are guaranteed an empty middle seat next to them. On flights operated by the 777 and 787, Premium Economy replaces Works Deluxe.

Air New Zealand
New Zealand
has reintroduced Space+ seats on the Trans-tasman routes, with 35 inches of pitch in the first three rows of the A320s. These are only available to Works or Works Deluxe passengers, and only Airpoints Gold Elite and Gold members of Air New Zealand's Airpoints frequent flyer programme are allocated these seats.[74] The AVOD system consists of an 8.4-inch screen. In addition, the AVOD screens allow ordering of drinks and snacks, to be delivered to the seat by cabin crew members. Works and Works Deluxe passengers get complimentary drinks after their meal, while drinks for Seat and Seat+Bag passengers, and snacks for all passengers are available for purchase using a credit card or a voucher purchased at the airport prior to boarding. Airpoints Gold and Gold Elite are entitled to an additional carry-on bag up to 7 kg on all options. Airpoints Gold, Gold Elite and Koru
Koru
members are entitled to an additional checked bag up to 23 kg on all options except Seat.[72] Domestic[edit] Air New Zealand
New Zealand
domestic services are operated in a single class all-economy configuration. Seating forward of the over-wing emergency exits on A320 aircraft are Space+ seats, with a larger pitch between seats, but otherwise are effectively economy seats. From July 2014, Air New Zealand
New Zealand
has four domestic fare options, each building on the previous option:

Seat – the basic option, consisting of a seat, one cabin bag up to 7 kg, and tea/coffee/water and snacks (depending on aircraft) Seat + Bag – the Seat option, plus one checked bag up to 23 kg FlexiTime – the Seat + Bag option, plus the option to request a specific seat prior to check-in (Airpoints Gold/Elite and Koru
Koru
members can request a seat regardless of fare option), and the ability to change to an earlier or later flight on the same day and route for no extra cost (subject to availability). FlexiPlus – the FlexiTime option, plus an extra checked bag up to 23 kg, and the ability to change a flight to a different date without a change fee (if the new flight is more expensive, the difference must be paid).

Only FlexiPlus is refundable; all other options are non-refundable. FlexiPlus passengers, along with Airpoints and Koru
Koru
members, get priority over the Space+ seating. All domestic passengers are offered tea, coffee or water. Passengers on turboprop aircraft are also offered a biscuit, while those on A320 flights are offered a choice of snacks, including vege crisps, muesli bars, and biscuits. Hard lollies are handed out to passengers on the descent. On flights before 9 am on A320 aircraft, muesli and muffins are offered, as well as morning newspapers, and on flights between 4:30 pm and 7:00 pm, beer and wine are offered to passengers (provided they are 18 years or over), as well as Lemon & Paeroa, cheese, crackers and grapes, and bagel crisps and hummus. Services[edit] Air New Zealand
New Zealand
Lounge[edit] Main article: Koru
Koru
Lounge

Air New Zealand
New Zealand
Koru
Koru
Lounge in Wellington

Air New Zealand
New Zealand
self check-in kiosks, Wellington

The Air New Zealand
New Zealand
Lounge is the name for Air New Zealand's network of airline lounges around the world. Members of Air New Zealand
New Zealand
Koru programme may access the lounges, and also get valet parking, priority wait listing, exclusive check-in, extra checked in baggage, and preferred seating. Airpoints[edit] Airpoints is Air New Zealand's frequent-flyer programme. Members earn Airpoints Dollars, which they can redeem at face value on any fare on Air New Zealand
New Zealand
ticketed and operated flights. Members can attain status tiers, with increasing privileges ranging from Silver to Gold, then Elite, by accumulating their Status Points, which are earned separately from Airpoints Dollars. Airpoints Gold and Airpoints Elite have the same recognition as Star Alliance
Star Alliance
Gold status and benefits across the Star Alliance
Star Alliance
network. Airpoints Silver status is equivalent to Star Alliance
Star Alliance
Silver. Airpoints members receive Status Points for almost every Air New Zealand flight, as well as many other flights with its Star Alliance partners. Status Points enable members to reach a higher status faster. Status Points will still be granted even on discount fares (such as Smart Saver and grabaseat fares) that normally do not earn Airpoints Dollars.[75] Incidents and accidents[edit] Main article: List of Air New Zealand
New Zealand
accidents and incidents Controversies[edit] Outsourcing maintenance[edit] On 19 October 2005, Air New Zealand
New Zealand
proposed outsourcing most of its heavy maintenance on its long-haul aircraft and engines, which would result in about 600 job losses, mostly in Auckland. Air New Zealand said that there were larger maintenance providers that could provide maintenance work more cheaply due to their large scale. The proposal was estimated to save $100 million over five years and came after many attempts to attract contracts to service other airlines' longhaul aircraft. Eventually, a union proposal to save some of the remaining jobs was accepted. The proposal included shift and pay changes (most of them pay cuts) which would allow about 300 engineers in Auckland
Auckland
to keep their jobs. 200 were made redundant or resigned.[76] Minor seating policy[edit] Main article: Airline sex discrimination policy controversy In November 2005, it was revealed that Air New Zealand
New Zealand
(along with Qantas
Qantas
and British Airways) had a policy of not seating adult male passengers next to unaccompanied children. The policy came to light following an incident in 2004 when a man who was seated next to a young boy on a Qantas
Qantas
flight in New Zealand
New Zealand
was asked to change seats with a female passenger. A steward informed him that "it was the airline's policy that only women were allowed to sit next to unaccompanied children". Air New Zealand
New Zealand
later said it had a similar policy to Qantas.[77][78] Qantas
Qantas
code-share[edit] On 12 April 2006, Air New Zealand
New Zealand
and Qantas
Qantas
announced that they had signed a code-share agreement for their trans-Tasman routes and would file for authorisation from the New Zealand
New Zealand
Ministry of Transport[79] and the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission.[80] The airlines maintained that they were making losses on Tasman routes due to too many empty seats, and that a codeshare would return the routes to profitability. Critics, particularly Wellington
Wellington
International Airport, Christchurch
Christchurch
Airport and Melbourne Airport, argued that the codeshare would lead to reduced passenger choice and higher airfares, and that cities such as Auckland
Auckland
and Sydney
Sydney
would benefit immensely through economic activity services would bring. On 15 November 2006 Air New Zealand
New Zealand
announced it was withdrawing its application after a draft decision by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission to not approve the code-sharing agreement. Alternative propulsion[edit] In the effort to develop an aviation biofuel, Air New Zealand
New Zealand
and Boeing researched the jatropha plant to see if it was a viable green alternative to conventional fuel.[81] A two-hour test flight, using a 50-50 mixture of the new biofuel with Jet A-1 feeding a Rolls Royce RB-211 engine of one of the airline's 747-400s, was completed on 30 December 2008. The engine was then removed to be scrutinised and studied to identify any differences between the jatropha blend and regular Jet A1. No effects to performances were found. The use of jatropha has been identified as a possible future fuel but large tracts of low quality land needed to grow the plant would have to be found without impeding other agricultural uses.[82] See also[edit]

New Zealand
New Zealand
portal Companies portal Aviation portal

Air transport in New Zealand List of airports in New Zealand List of airlines of New Zealand Transport in New Zealand

References[edit]

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New Zealand
Limited (104799) -- Companies Office". Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment. Retrieved 7 September 2014.  ^ "Air NZ profit soars 40pc". New Zealand
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New Zealand
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New Zealand
sells Blenheim's Safe Air to Airbus". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 16 July 2015.  ^ "Air New Zealand
New Zealand
Cup". Air New Zealand. 2009. Archived from the original on 19 August 2006.  ^ " ITM Cup the new prize of national provincial rugby" (Press release). New Zealand
New Zealand
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New Zealand
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finishes removing the Pacific Wave from its Airbus
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New Zealand
and Tourism New Zealand
New Zealand
enter into new $20 million partnership". Tourism New Zealand. 11 June 2013. Archived from the original on 7 July 2013. Retrieved 17 June 2013.  ^ "Air New Zealand
New Zealand
and Tourism New Zealand
New Zealand
Enter Into New $20 Million Partnership". The Flying Social Network. 11 June 2013. Archived from the original on 19 June 2013. Retrieved 17 June 2013.  ^ Rendel, David G. A. (1975). Civil aviation in New Zealand: an illustrated history. Reed. p. 67. ISBN 9780589009052. Retrieved 10 December 2017.  ^ Air New Zealand – Official airline to Middle-earth (press release) 14 December 2002 ^ Return of Aragorn and Legolas: Air New Zealand
New Zealand
Debuts Newest Flying Billboard Archived 19 February 2006 at the Wayback Machine. 19 November 2003 ^ "Air NZ reveals plans for black jet – nzherald.co.nz". New Zealand Herald. 22 September 2010. Retrieved 22 September 2010.  ^ "Air NZ celebrates four more years with the All Blacks". Scoop.co.nz. Air New Zealand. 21 October 2011. Retrieved 22 October 2011.  ^ Bradley, Grant (31 October 2012). "Air NZ gets the keys to new plane". The New Zealand
New Zealand
Herald. Retrieved 1 November 2012.  ^ "Air New Zealand's Beech 1900D painted all black – flightglobal.com". Flight Global Blogs. 10 January 2012. Retrieved 14 June 2012.  ^ "Air New Zealand
New Zealand
pins hopes on Hobbit payoff". Television New Zealand. 24 November 2012. Retrieved 25 November 2012.  ^ "Air New Zealand
New Zealand
renews agreements to operate long haul Cook Islands services". Air New Zealand. 25 March 2014. Archived from the original on 14 December 2014. Retrieved 14 December 2014.  ^ "Air NZ boosts charter flights to Japan". The New Zealand Herald.  ^ "Profile on Air New Zealand". CAPA. Centre for Aviation. Archived from the original on 2016-10-31. Retrieved 2016-10-31.  ^ http://australianaviation.com.au/2018/04/air-new-zealand-and-virgin-australia-to-end-trans-tasman-alliance/ ^ "Operating Fleet". Air New Zealand. Retrieved 8 October 2017.  ^ "Air New Zealand
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welcomes arrival of first premium heavy 787-9". Australian Aviation. Retrieved 11 October 2017.  ^ http://www.airfleets.net/flottecie/Air%20New%20Zealand.htm ^ "Air New Zealand
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Business Class Seats review". waytofly.com.  ^ "Air New Zealand
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777-300". Retrieved 20 January 2012.  ^ "Air New Zealand
New Zealand
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New Zealand
offers beds in economy". The Daily Mail. London. Archived from the original on 5 November 2010. Retrieved 12 November 2010.  ^ "Air New Zealand's 'cuddle class' raises 'mile high' concerns". One India News. 1 February 2010. Retrieved 12 November 2010.  ^ The Economy SkyCouch Activity Guide at Air New Zealand's official Facebook
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New Zealand
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New Zealand
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New Zealand
Space+ seat". Retrieved 20 January 2012.  ^ "Air NZ Status Points". Air New Zealand. 2009.  ^ "Air NZ engineers accept deal". The New Zealand
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Herald. Retrieved 31 July 2010.  ^ International air carriage competition Archived 29 April 2008 at the Wayback Machine. ^ " Qantas
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External links[edit] Media related to Air New Zealand
New Zealand
at Wikimedia Commons

Official website

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Thai Airways
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Members

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Air New Zealand
New Zealand
Group

Current subsidiaries

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Former names

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Hub

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Destinations

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Scheduled passenger

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Link Air Nelson Mount Cook Airline

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See also:

List of general aviation operators of New Zealand

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Europe
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regional office

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NZX 50 companies of New Zealand

As of 19 September 2016

A2 Milk Company Air New Zealand ANZ Argosy Property Auckland
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Shareholders Fund Freightways Genesis Energy Goodman Property Trust Heartland Bank Infratil Kathmandu Kiwi Property Mainfreight Mercury Energy Meridian Energy Metlifecare Metro Performance Glass Nuplex NZX New Zealand
New Zealand
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Former NZX 50 companies (partial list)

AFFCO AMP APN News & Media Cavalier Diligent Corporation Fisher & Paykel Appliances Goodman Fielder Lion Nathan Michael Hill OceanaGold Pacific Edge PGG Wrightson Pike River Coal Pumpkin Patch Rakon Skellerup Steel & Tube Telstr

.