HOME
The Info List - Ahmići Massacre





The Ahmići
Ahmići
massacre was the culmination of the Lašva Valley ethnic cleansing committed by the Croatian Community of Herzeg-Bosnia's political and military leadership on Bosniak
Bosniak
civilians during the Croat- Bosniak
Bosniak
War in April 1993. It was the largest massacre committed during the conflict between Bosnian Croats
Bosnian Croats
and the Bosniak-dominated Bosnian government. The International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia
International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia
in The Hague has ruled that these crimes amounted to crimes against humanity in numerous verdicts against Croat political and military leaders and soldiers, most notably Dario Kordić, the political leader of Croats in Central Bosnia
Bosnia
who was sentenced to 25 years in prison.[1] The massacre was discovered by United Nations
United Nations
Peacekeeping troops of the 1st Battalion, Cheshire Regiment,[2] drawn from the British Army, under the command of Colonel Bob Stewart.[3][4][5]

Contents

1 Background 2 An organized attack 3 Murders of civilians 4 Destruction of property 5 The troops involved 6 Denial 7 Trial 8 Tribute 9 See also 10 Notes 11 References

11.1 Books

12 External links

12.1 Related films

Background[edit]

Ahmići

Location of Ahmići
Ahmići
in Bosnia
Bosnia
and Herzegovina

Ahmići
Ahmići
is a village in central Bosnia
Bosnia
and Herzegovina, located in the municipality of Vitez
Vitez
in the Lašva Valley. According to the 1991 census, 1,178 people lived in the village. 509 were Bosniaks, 592 were Croats, 30 were Serbs
Serbs
and 47 classified as "others". On 3 April 1993, the Bosnian Croat leadership met in Mostar
Mostar
to discuss the implementation of the Vance-Owen plan
Vance-Owen plan
and decided to implement the creation of "Croatian Provinces" (Provinces 3, 8 and 10) placing the Bosnian armed forces under the command of the General Staff of the Croatian Defence Council
Croatian Defence Council
(HVO), the military formation of Bosnian Croats. On 4 April, according to Reuters, the HVO headquarters in Mostar
Mostar
set a deadline for President of Bosnia and Herzegovina
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Alija Izetbegović to sign the above agreement and stated: "If Izetbegović fails to sign this agreement by April 15, the HVO will unilaterally enforce its jurisdiction in cantons three, eight and ten." In a message from HVO leaders Dario Kordić, Ignac Koštroman and Anto Valenta, Croats were instructed to display more Croatian flags on buildings.[1] An organized attack[edit] On Friday, 16 April 1993 at 05:30 hours, Croatian forces simultaneously attacked Vitez, Stari Vitez, Ahmići, Nadioci, Šantici, Pirići, Novaci, Putiš
Putiš
and Donja Večeriska. HVO General Tihomir Blaškić spoke of 20 to 22 sites of simultaneous combat all along the road linking Vitez, Travnik, and Busovača. The ICTY Trial Chamber found that this was a planned attack against the Bosniak civilian population.[6] The attack was preceded by several political declarations announcing that a conflict between Croatian forces and Bosnian forces was imminent. On the day of the attack, telephone lines had been cut because all communication exchanges in the municipality of Vitez
Vitez
were under HVO control.[citation needed] Croat inhabitants of those villages were warned of the attack and some of them were involved in preparing it. Croat women and children had been evacuated on the eve of the fighting. The method of attack displayed a high level of preparation. The attacks in the built-up areas, such as those carried out in the Ahmići
Ahmići
area were operations planned in minute detail with the aim of killing or driving out the Bosniak
Bosniak
population, resulting in a massacre. On the evening of 15 April, unusual HVO troop movements had been noticed.[citation needed] On the morning of 16 April, the main roads were blocked by Croat troops. According to several international observers, the attack occurred from three sides and was designed to force the fleeing population towards the south where elite marksmen with particularly sophisticated weapons shot those escaping. Other troops, organised in small groups of about five to ten soldiers, went from house to house setting them on fire and killing the residents. Around one hundred soldiers took part in the operation.[6] The attack resulted in the massacre of the Bosniak
Bosniak
villagers and the destruction of the village. Among the more than 100 who died were 32 women and 11 children under the age of 18. The aim of the HVO artillery was to support the infantry and destroy structures which the infantry could not. The mosque, for example, was hit by a shot from a powerful weapon. Later the minaret was blown up by Bralo and Jukić.[1] Murders of civilians[edit] Overall, 117[7] to 120[8] Bosniaks
Bosniaks
were killed in the massacre. Most of the men were shot at point blank range. Some men had been rounded up and then killed by Croatian soldiers. Twenty or so civilians were also killed in Donji Ahmići
Ahmići
as they tried to flee the village. The fleeing inhabitants had to cross an open field before getting to the main road. About twenty bodies of people killed by very precise shots were found in the field. Military experts concluded that they had been shot by marksmen. Other bodies were found in the houses so badly charred they could not be identified and in positions suggesting they had been burned alive. The victims included many women and children.[6] A European Community Monitor Mission
European Community Monitor Mission
observer said he had seen the bodies of children who, from their position, seemed to have died in agony in the flames: "some of the houses were absolute scenes of horror, because not only were the people dead, but there were those who were burned and obviously some had been burned with flame launchers, which had charred the bodies and this was the case of several of the bodies". According to the ECMM report, at least 103 people were killed during the attack on Ahmići.[6][9] Destruction of property[edit]

Bombed mosque in April 1993, Ahmići.

According to the Centre for Human Rights in Zenica, 180 of the existing 200 Bosniak
Bosniak
houses in Ahmići
Ahmići
were burned during the attack. The Commission on Human Rights made the same finding in its report dated 19 May 1993. According to the ECMM practically all the Bosnian Muslim houses in the villages of Ahmići, Nadioci, Pirići, Sivrino Selo, Gaćice, Gomionica, Gromiljak and Rotilj had been burned. According to ECMM observer "it was a whole area that was burning".[6] Several religious buildings were destroyed. Two mosques were deliberately mined and given the careful placement of the explosives inside the buildings. Furthermore, the mosque in Donji Ahmići
Ahmići
was destroyed by explosives laid around the base of its minaret.[6] The troops involved[edit] The troops involved in the attack included the Military Police Fourth Battalion and, in particular, the Džokeri Unit. The Džokeri (Jokers), an anti-terrorist squad with twenty or so members, were created in January 1993 from within the Military Police on the order of Zvonko Voković, whose mission was to carry out special assignments such as sabotage, stationed at the bungalow in Nadioci. Other participants included the Vitezovi, the Viteška brigade of the municipality of Vitez, the Nikola Šubić Zrinski brigade of Busovača, together with Domobrani units (units set up in each village in accordance with a decision from Mostar
Mostar
dated 8 February 1993) stationed at Ahmići, Šantići, Pirići and Nadioci. Many witnesses in the Blaškić case also referred to soldiers in camouflage uniforms being present, wearing the emblem of the HVO. Several Croat inhabitants of these villages also participated in the attack. They were members of the Domobrani such as Slavko Miličević for the Donji Ahmići
Ahmići
sector, Žarko Papić for the Zume area, Branko Perković in Nadioci, Zoran Kupreškić in Grabovi (an area in the centre of Ahmići), Nenad Šantić and Colic in Šantići.[6] Denial[edit] After the massacre, Croat leaders, supported by propaganda efforts, tried to deny the massacre or to blame other sides in the Bosnian War. Dario Kordić denied to Payam Akhavan, an investigator with the United Nations Centre for Human Rights, that the HVO were involved in the Ahmići
Ahmići
massacre; indeed, he said that his men, as good Christians, would never commit such acts and blamed the Serbs
Serbs
or the Muslims themselves: according to him, no investigation was necessary. A similar response was given by general Tihomir Blaškić to British Colonel Stewart in Kordić's presence.[1] Trial[edit] The International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia
International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia
(ICTY) in the Hague has ruled that these crimes amounted to crimes against humanity in numerous verdicts against Croat political and military leaders and soldiers, most notably Dario Kordić, political leader of Croats in Central Bosnia
Bosnia
who was sentenced to 25 years in prison.[1] Based on the evidence of numerous HVO attacks at that time, the ICTY Trial Chamber concluded in the Kordić and Čerkez case that by April 1993 Croat leadership had a common design or plan conceived and executed to ethnically cleanse Bosniaks
Bosniaks
from the Lašva Valley. Dario Kordić, as the local political leader, was found to be the planner and instigator of this plan.[1] Further concluding that the Croatian Army
Croatian Army
was involved in the campaign, the ICTY defined the events as an international conflict between Bosnia and Herzegovina
Bosnia and Herzegovina
and Croatia.[10] Former Croatian president Stjepan Mesić
Stjepan Mesić
revealed thousands of documents and audio tapes recorded by Franjo Tuđman
Franjo Tuđman
about his plans during a case against Croat leaders from Bosnia and Herzegovina
Bosnia and Herzegovina
for war crimes committed against Bosniaks. During the trial against Tihomir Blaškić, who was the HVO commander for the Central Bosnian Operative Zone, for the crimes in Ahmići, the defence argued that there was a parallel line of command surpassing Blaškić that went to the political leadership of Herzeg-Bosnia. There were reports in the media that Tuđman himself participated in the coverup. The appeals chamber of the ICTY ruled that Blaškić did not have command responsibility for the massacre and lowered the initial sentence (in 2000) of 45 years to nine years of imprisonment. He was released after serving 8 years and 4 months of his sentence.[6][11] The ICTY initially indicted sixteen Croats and convicted eight of them by now of their roles in the Lašva Valley ethnic cleansing.[citation needed] Ignac Koštroman and Anto Valenta were never charged by the ICTY.[citation needed] Tribute[edit]

Ivo Josipović
Ivo Josipović
and Mustafa Cerić by the commemoration's wreath

Croatia's president Ivo Josipović
Ivo Josipović
alongside Islamic and Catholic religious leaders paid tribute on 15 April 2010 to victims in Ahmići and Križančevo selo.[12] See also[edit]

List of massacres in Bosnia
Bosnia
and Herzegovina

Notes[edit]

^ a b c d e f "ICTY: Kordić and Čerkez verdict" (PDF).  ^ Stephen Badsey; Paul Chester Latawski (2004). Britain, NATO, and the lessons of the Balkan conflicts, 1991–1999. Routledge. p. 35. ISBN 0714651907.  ^ Colin McInnes, Nicholas J. Wheeler. Dimensions of Western military intervention.  ^ Welsh, Paul (14 August 1999). "Return to the land he never really left". The Independent. London, UK. Retrieved 23 April 2010.  ^ Charles R. Shrader. The Muslim-Croat civil war in Central Bosnia: a military history, 1992–1994.  ^ a b c d e f g h "ICTY: Blaškić verdict" (PDF).  ^ Goldstein (1999), p. 246 ^ Mojzes (2011), p. 174 ^ "ICTY: Blaškić judgement" (PDF). United Nations
United Nations
International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia. 3 March 2000.  ^ "HRW: Conflict between Bosnia and Herzegovina
Bosnia and Herzegovina
and Croatia".  ^ Kristine Hoglund, Magnus Oberg: Understanding Peace Research: Methods and Challenges, Taylor & Francis, 2011, p. 44 ^ Aida Cerkez-Robinson (15 April 2010). "Croatian president honors war victims in Bosnia". The Guardian. London, UK. Associated Press. Retrieved 16 April 2010. 

References[edit] Books[edit]

Goldstein, Ivo (1999). Croatia: A History. McGill-Queen's Press. Retrieved 25 July 2013.  Mojzes, Paul (2011). Balkan Genocides: Holocaust and Ethnic Cleansing in the 20th Century. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc. Retrieved 23 December 2012. 

External links[edit]

The UN indictment of the perpetrators Photographs of the village after the attack ICTY: Initial indictment for the ethnic cleansing of the Lasva Valley area – Part I ICTY: Initial indictment for the ethnic cleansing of the Lasva Valley area – Part II ICTY: Kordić and Čerkez verdict ICTY: Blaškić verdict HRW: Conflict between Bosnia and Herzegovina
Bosnia and Herzegovina
and Croatia

Related films[edit]

Warriors on IMDb The Death of Yugoslavia on IMDb
IMDb
– Part III. The Struggle for Bosnia

v t e

Bosnian War

Part of the Yugoslav Wars

Belligerents

Bosnian side

Army of the Republic of Bosnia
Bosnia
and Herzegovina

1st Corps 2nd Corps 3rd Corps 4th Corps 5th Corps 6th Corps 7th Corps

Paramilitary

Patriotic League Green Berets Black Swans Mujahideen Croatian Defence Forces

Croat side

Croatian Defence Council

1OZ 2OZ 3OZ 4OZ

Paramilitary

Croatian Defence Forces Knights

Serb side

Army of Republika Srpska

1st Krajina Corps 2nd Krajina Corps 3rd Corps East Bosnia
Bosnia
Corps Herzegovina Corps Sarajevo-Romanija Corps Drina Corps

Paramilitary

Wolves of Vučjak White Eagles Serb Volunteer Guard Scorpions Yellow Wasps

Prelude

Karađorđevo meeting Zulfikarpašić–Karadžić agreement RAM Plan Serb Autonomous Regions

Bosanska Krajina Herzegovina North-East Bosnia Romanija

Establishment of Republika Srpska Bosnia and Herzegovina
Bosnia and Herzegovina
independence referendum Sarajevo wedding shooting Declaration of the Republic of Bosnia
Bosnia
and Herzegovina Battle of Bosanski Brod Sijekovac killings Bijeljina massacre 1992 anti-war protests in Sarajevo

1992

Battle of Kupres Siege of Sarajevo Foča massacres Siege of Srebrenica Zvornik massacre Doboj Snagovo massacre Prijedor ethnic cleansing Sarajevo column incident Siege of Goražde Graz agreement Glogova massacre Lašva Valley ethnic cleansing Tuzla column incident Zaklopača massacre Vilina Vlas Siege of Doboj Bijeli Potok massacre Pionirska Street fire Operation Jackal Višegrad massacres

Bosanska Jagodina Paklenik Barimo Sjeverin

Čemerno massacre Siege of Bihać Ahatovići massacre Croat– Bosniak
Bosniak
War Operation Vrbas '92 Operation Corridor 92  Croatian Republic of Herzeg-Bosnia Agreement on Friendship and Cooperation between Bosnia
Bosnia
and Herzegovina and Croatia Korićani Cliffs massacre

1993

Kravica attack Duša killings Skelani massacre Štrpci Siege of Mostar Srebrenica shelling Ahmići
Ahmići
massacre Trusina killings Sovići and Doljani massacres Vranica case Dobrinja mortar attack Battle of Žepče

Operation Irma Operation Neretva '93 Grabovica massacre Mokronoge massacre Stupni Do massacre Autonomous Province of Western Bosnia Operation Deny Flight Križančevo Selo killings

1994

Operation Tvigi 94 First Markale massacre Banja Luka incident Washington Agreement  Federation of Bosnia
Bosnia
and Herzegovina Operation Bøllebank Attack on Spin magazine journalists Operation Tiger Battle of Kupres Operation Amanda Operation Spider Operation Winter '94

1995

Operation Leap 1 Battle of Orašje Operation Leap 2 Split Agreement Operation Summer '95 Pale air strikes Tuzla shelling Battle of Vrbanja Bridge Srebrenica massacre

Kravica

Battle for Vozuća Operation Miracle Operation Storm Second Markale massacre NATO
NATO
bombing campaign Operation Mistral 2 Operation Sana Operation Una Operation Southern Move Exodus of Sarajevo Serbs Dayton Agreement   Bosnia
Bosnia
and Herzegovina

Internment camps

Silos Manjača Liplje Luka Omarska Keraterm Trnopolje Sušica Čelebići Batković Dretelj Uzamnica Heliodrom Gabela Vojno

Aspects

Ethnic cleansing
Ethnic cleansing
and massacres

Bosnian genocide

Internment camps Rape Peace plans NATO
NATO
intervention Foreign support Foreign fighters

Timeline of the Bosnian War
Bosnian War
(Timeline of the Croat– Bosniak
Bosniak
War)

Category Commons

v t e

Yugoslav Wars

Overview Participants People

Wars and conflicts

Slovenian War of Independence (1991) Croatian War of Independence
Croatian War of Independence
(1991–95) Bosnian War
Bosnian War
(1992–95)

Croat–Bosniak War
Croat–Bosniak War
(1992–94)

Kosovo War
Kosovo War
(1998–99) Insurgency in the Preševo Valley
Insurgency in the Preševo Valley
(1999–2001) 2001 insurgency in the Republic of Macedonia
2001 insurgency in the Republic of Macedonia
(2001)

Background:

Timeline of Yugoslav breakup Josip Broz Tito Brotherhood and unity League of Communists of Yugoslavia Croatian Spring SANU Memorandum Contributions for the Slovenian National Program Anti-bureaucratic revolution JBTZ-trial Gazimestan speech RAM Plan Breakup of Yugoslavia Karađorđevo agreement Graz agreement Joint Criminal Enterprise Role of the media in the Yugoslav wars

Consequences:

Brioni Agreement Dayton Agreement Agreement on Sub-Regional Arms Control International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY)

List of ICTY indictees

Human rights in Croatia Human rights in Serbia

Articles on nationalism:

Ethnic cleansing Greater Albania Greater Croatia United Macedonia Greater Serbia United Slovenia Anti-Serbian sentiment Islamophobia Albanian nationalism Bosnianism Croatian nationalism Macedonian nationalism Montenegrin nationalism Serbian nationalism Serbian–Montenegrin unionism Slovenian nationalism Yugoslavism

Ex-Yugoslav republics:

 Yugoslavia (SFRY)

 Croatia  Slovenia   Bosnia
Bosnia
and Herzegovina  Macedonia  Yugoslavia (FRY)

Unrecognized entities:

  Republic of Serbian Krajina
Republic of Serbian Krajina
(RSK)

SAO Eastern Slavonia, Baranja and Western Syrmia SAO Krajina SAO Western Slavonia

  Republika Srpska
Republika Srpska
(RS)

SAO Bosanska Krajina SAO Herzegovina SAO North-Eastern Bosnia SAO Romanija

 Croatian Republic of Herzeg- Bosnia
Bosnia
(HRHB) Autonomous Province of Western Bosnia
Bosnia
(APZB)

United Nations
United Nations
protectorate:

United Nations
United Nations
Transitional Authority for Eastern Slavonia, Baranja and Western Sirmium (UNTAES) United Nations
United Nations
Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo (UNMIK)

Armies:

Yugoslav People's Army
Yugoslav People's Army
(JNA) Yugoslav Territorial Defence (TO) Slovenian Territorial Defence
Slovenian Territorial Defence
(TORS) Yugoslav Army (VJ) Croatian Army
Croatian Army
(HV) BiH Territorial Defence (TORBIH) Army of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina
Bosnia and Herzegovina
(ARBiH) Army of Republika Srpska
Army of Republika Srpska
(VRS) Army of the Republic of Serb Krajina
Army of the Republic of Serb Krajina
(SVK) Croatian Defence Council
Croatian Defence Council
(HVO)

Military formations and volunteers:

Croatian Defence Forces
Croatian Defence Forces
(HOS) White Eagles Serb Guard (SG) Serb Volunteer Guard
Serb Volunteer Guard
(SDG) Scorpions Yellow Wasps Greek Volunteer Guard Wolves of Vučjak

External factors:

NATO United Nations
United Nations
(UN)

United Nations
United Nations
Protection Force (UNPROFOR) United Nations
United Nations
Confidence Restoration Operation (UNCRO)

Politicians:

Ante Marković Borisav Jović Slobodan Milošević Momir Bulatović Milo Đukanović Vuk Drašković Milan Kučan Lojze Peterle Janez Janša Franjo Tuđman Stjepan Mesić Ante Paradžik
Ante Paradžik
† Dobroslav Paraga Alija Izetbegović Mate Boban Fikret Abdić Radovan Karadžić Biljana Plavšić Momčilo Krajišnik Mirko Jović Jovan Rašković
Jovan Rašković
† Milan Babić Goran Hadžić Milan Martić Vojislav Šešelj

Top military commanders:

Veljko Kadijević Života Panić Momčilo Perišić Janko Bobetko Martin Špegelj Gojko Šušak Mile Novaković Mile Mrkšić Ratko Mladić Rasim Delić Sefer Halilović Atif Dudaković Dragoljub Ojdanić Nebojša Pavković Vladimir Lazarević

Other notable commanders:

Blago Zadro
Blago Zadro
 † Blaž Kraljević
Blaž Kraljević
† Ante Gotovina Jovan Divjak Naser Orić Veselin Šljivančanin Milan Tepić
Milan Tepić
 † Đorđe Božović  † Vukašin Šoškoćanin
Vukašin Šoškoćanin
Veljko Milanković
Veljko Milanković
† Ljubiša Savić Dragan Vasiljković Željko Ražnatović Milorad Ulemek

Key foreign figures:

Lord Carrington Cyrus Vance Lord Owen Richard Holbrooke Robert Badinter

v t e

Croatian War of Independence

Part of the Yugoslav Wars

Prelude

Log Revolution SAO Krajina

1991

Pakrac clash Plitvice Lakes incident 1991 siege of Kijevo Battle of Borovo Selo 1991 riot in Zadar 1991 protest in Split SAO Eastern Slavonia, Baranja and Western Syrmia Operation Stinger Dalj massacre Operation Labrador SAO Western Slavonia Battle of Vukovar Battle of Osijek Battle of Gospić Battle of Kusonje Battle of the Barracks Siege of Varaždin Barracks Siege of Bjelovar Barracks Battle of Zadar Battle of Šibenik 1991 Yugoslav campaign in Croatia Siege of Dubrovnik Bombing of Banski dvori Široka Kula massacre Lovas massacre Gospić massacre Baćin massacre Saborsko massacre Operation Otkos 10 Battle of Logorište Erdut massacre Battle of the Dalmatian channels Kostrići massacre Škabrnja massacre Vukovar massacre Vance plan Operation Whirlwind Paulin Dvor massacre Gornje Jame massacre Operation Orkan 91 Voćin massacre Joševica massacre Operation Devil's Beam Bruška massacre

1992

Sarajevo Agreement 1992 European Community Monitor Mission
European Community Monitor Mission
helicopter downing Operation Baranja Operation Jackal Battle of the Miljevci Plateau Operation Tiger (1992) Operation Liberated Land Battle of Konavle Operation Vlaštica

1993–94

Operation Maslenica Daruvar Agreement Operation Backstop Operation Medak Pocket Z-4 Plan Operation Winter '94

1995

Operation Leap 1 Operation Flash Zagreb rocket attack Operation Leap 2 Operation Summer '95 Operation Storm Operation Maestral 2 Varivode massacre

Timeline of the Croatian War of Independence

Internment camps

Begejci camp Bučje camp Knin camp Lora prison camp Ovčara camp Sremska Mitrovica prison camp Stajićevo camp Velepromet camp

Other

Independence of Croatia Persecution of Croats in Serbia during the war in Croatia

Category Commons

v t e

Bosnian War

Part of the Yugoslav Wars

Belligerents

Bosnian side

Army of the Republic of Bosnia
Bosnia
and Herzegovina

1st Corps 2nd Corps 3rd Corps 4th Corps 5th Corps 6th Corps 7th Corps

Paramilitary

Patriotic League Green Berets Black Swans Mujahideen Croatian Defence Forces

Croat side

Croatian Defence Council

1OZ 2OZ 3OZ 4OZ

Paramilitary

Croatian Defence Forces Knights

Serb side

Army of Republika Srpska

1st Krajina Corps 2nd Krajina Corps 3rd Corps East Bosnia
Bosnia
Corps Herzegovina Corps Sarajevo-Romanija Corps Drina Corps

Paramilitary

Wolves of Vučjak White Eagles Serb Volunteer Guard Scorpions Yellow Wasps

Prelude

Karađorđevo meeting Zulfikarpašić–Karadžić agreement RAM Plan Serb Autonomous Regions

Bosanska Krajina Herzegovina North-East Bosnia Romanija

Establishment of Republika Srpska Bosnia and Herzegovina
Bosnia and Herzegovina
independence referendum Sarajevo wedding shooting Declaration of the Republic of Bosnia
Bosnia
and Herzegovina Battle of Bosanski Brod Sijekovac killings Bijeljina massacre 1992 anti-war protests in Sarajevo

1992

Battle of Kupres Siege of Sarajevo Foča massacres Siege of Srebrenica Zvornik massacre Doboj Snagovo massacre Prijedor ethnic cleansing Sarajevo column incident Siege of Goražde Graz agreement Glogova massacre Lašva Valley ethnic cleansing Tuzla column incident Zaklopača massacre Vilina Vlas Siege of Doboj Bijeli Potok massacre Pionirska Street fire Operation Jackal Višegrad massacres

Bosanska Jagodina Paklenik Barimo Sjeverin

Čemerno massacre Siege of Bihać Ahatovići massacre Croat– Bosniak
Bosniak
War Operation Vrbas '92 Operation Corridor 92  Croatian Republic of Herzeg-Bosnia Agreement on Friendship and Cooperation between Bosnia
Bosnia
and Herzegovina and Croatia Korićani Cliffs massacre

1993

Kravica attack Duša killings Skelani massacre Štrpci Siege of Mostar Srebrenica shelling Ahmići
Ahmići
massacre Trusina killings Sovići and Doljani massacres Vranica case Dobrinja mortar attack Battle of Žepče

Operation Irma Operation Neretva '93 Grabovica massacre Mokronoge massacre Stupni Do massacre Autonomous Province of Western Bosnia Operation Deny Flight Križančevo Selo killings

1994

Operation Tvigi 94 First Markale massacre Banja Luka incident Washington Agreement  Federation of Bosnia
Bosnia
and Herzegovina Operation Bøllebank Attack on Spin magazine journalists Operation Tiger Battle of Kupres Operation Amanda Operation Spider Operation Winter '94

1995

Operation Leap 1 Battle of Orašje Operation Leap 2 Split Agreement Operation Summer '95 Pale air strikes Tuzla shelling Battle of Vrbanja Bridge Srebrenica massacre

Kravica

Battle for Vozuća Operation Miracle Operation Storm Second Markale massacre NATO
NATO
bombing campaign Operation Mistral 2 Operation Sana Operation Una Operation Southern Move Exodus of Sarajevo Serbs Dayton Agreement   Bosnia
Bosnia
and Herzegovina

Internment camps

Silos Manjača Liplje Luka Omarska Keraterm Trnopolje Sušica Čelebići Batković Dretelj Uzamnica Heliodrom Gabela Vojno

Aspects

Ethnic cleansing
Ethnic cleansing
and massacres

Bosnian genocide

Internment camps Rape Peace plans NATO
NATO
intervention Foreign support Foreign fighters

Timeline of the Bosnian War
Bosnian War
(Timeline of the Croat– Bosniak
Bosniak
War)

Category Commons

Category Commons

Coordinates: 44°08′30″N 17°53′37″E / 44.14167°N 17.89361°E / 44.141

.