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Abū Ḥanīfa al-Nuʿmān b. Thābit b. Zūṭā b. Marzubān (Arabic: أبو حنيفة نعمان بن ثابت بن زوطا بن مرزبان‎; c. September 5, 699 - June 14, 767), known as Abū Ḥanīfa for short, or reverently as Imam Abū Ḥanīfa by Sunni Muslims,[5] was an 8th-century Iraqi Sunni Muslim
Sunni Muslim
theologian and jurist,[6] who became the eponymous founder of the Hanafi
Hanafi
school of orthodox Sunni jurisprudence, which has remained the most widely practiced law school in the Sunni tradition.[6] He is often alluded to by the reverential epithets al-Imām al-aʿẓam ("The Great Imam") and Sirāj al-aʾimma ("The Lamp of the Imams") in Sunni Islam.[6][3] Born to a Muslim family in Kufa,[6] Abu Hanifa
Abu Hanifa
is known to have travelled to the Hejaz
Hejaz
region of Arabia
Arabia
in his youth, where he studied under the most renowned teachers in Mecca
Mecca
and Medina
Medina
at the time.[6] As his career as a theologian and jurist progressed, Abu Hanifa
Abu Hanifa
became known for favoring the use of reason in his legal rulings (faqīh dhū raʾy) and even in his theology.[6] Abu Hanifa's theological school is what would later develop into the Maturidi
Maturidi
school of orthodox Sunni theology.[6] He is also considered a renowned Islamic scholar and personality by Zaydi Shia Muslims.[7]

Contents

1 Life

1.1 Childhood 1.2 Adulthood and death

2 Sources and methodology 3 Generational status 4 Reception 5 Early Islam
Islam
scholars 6 Works

6.1 Confusion regarding Al- Fiqh
Fiqh
Al-Akbar

7 Citations 8 References 9 External links

Life[edit] Childhood[edit] Abū Ḥanīfah was born in the city of Kufa
Kufa
in Iraq,[8][9] during the reign of the Umayyad caliph Abd al-Malik ibn Marwan. His father, Thabit bin Zuta, a trader from Kabul
Kabul
(today in Afghanistan), was 40 years old at the time of Abū Ḥanīfah's birth. His ancestry is generally accepted as being of Persian origin as suggested by the etymology of the names of his grandfather (Zuta) and great-grandfather (Mah). The historian Al-Khatib al-Baghdadi records a statement from Imām Abū Ḥanīfah's grandson, Ismail bin Hammad, who gave Abū Ḥanīfah's lineage as Thabit bin Numan bin Marzban and claiming to be of Persian origin.[3][4] The discrepancy in the names, as given by Ismail of Abū Ḥanīfah's grandfather and great-grandfather, are thought to be due to Zuta's adoption of the Arabic name (Numan) upon his acceptance of Islam
Islam
and that Mah and Marzban were titles or official designations in Persia, with the latter, meaning a margrave, referring to the noble ancestry of Abū Ḥanīfah's family as the Sasanian
Sasanian
Marzbans (equivalent of margraves). The widely accepted opinion, however, is that most probably he was of Persian ancestry .[3][4]

Islam
Islam
portal

Adulthood and death[edit]

Abu Hanifa Mosque
Abu Hanifa Mosque
in Baghdad, Iraq

In 763, al-Mansur, the Abbasid monarch offered Abu Hanifa
Abu Hanifa
the post of Chief Judge of the State, but he declined the offer, choosing to remain independent. His student Abu Yusuf
Abu Yusuf
was later appointed Qadi Al-Qudat (Chief Judge of the State) by the Caliph
Caliph
Harun al-Rashid.[10] In his reply to al-Mansur, Abū Ḥanīfah said that he was not fit for the post. Al-Mansur, who had his own ideas and reasons for offering the post, lost his temper and accused Abū Ḥanīfah of lying. "If I am lying," Abū Ḥanīfah said, "then my statement is doubly correct. How can you appoint a liar to the exalted post of a Chief Qadi
Qadi
(Judge)?" Incensed by this reply, the ruler had Abū Ḥanīfah arrested, locked in prison and tortured. He was never fed nor cared for.[11] Even there, the jurist continued to teach those who were permitted to come to him. In 767, Abū Ḥanīfah died in prison. The cause of his death is not clear, as some say that Abū Ḥanīfah issued a legal opinion for bearing arms against Al-Mansur, and the latter had him poisoned.[12] The fellow prisoner and Jewish Karaite founder, Anan Ben David, is said to have received life-saving counsel from the subject.[13] It was said that so many people attended his funeral that the funeral service was repeated six times for more than 50,000 people who had amassed before he was actually buried. On the authority of the historian al-Khatib, it can be said that for full twenty days people went on performing funeral prayer for him. Later, after many years, the Abū Ḥanīfah Mosque was built in the Adhamiyah
Adhamiyah
neighbourhood of Baghdad. The tomb of Abū Ḥanīfah and the tomb of Abdul Qadir Gilani
Abdul Qadir Gilani
were destroyed by Shah Ismail
Shah Ismail
of Safavi empire in 1508.[14] In 1533, Ottomans conquered Baghdad
Baghdad
and rebuilt the tomb of Abū Ḥanīfah and other Sunni sites.[15] Sources and methodology[edit] The sources from which Abu Hanifa
Abu Hanifa
derived Islamic law, in order of importance and preference, are: the Qur'an, the authentic narrations of the Muslim prophet Muhammad
Muhammad
(known as hadith), consensus of the Muslim community (ijma), analogical reasoning (qiyas), juristic discretion (istihsan) and the customs of the local population enacting said law (urf). The development of analogical reason and the scope and boundaries by which it may be used is recognized by the majority of Muslim jurists, but its establishment as a legal tool is the result of the Hanafi
Hanafi
school. While it was likely used by some of his teachers, Abu Hanifa
Abu Hanifa
is regarded by modern scholarship as the first to formally adopt and institute analogical reason as a part of Islamic law.[16] As the fourth Caliph, Ali
Ali
had transferred the Islamic capital to Kufa, and many of the first generation of Muslims had settled there, the Hanafi
Hanafi
school of law based many of its rulings on the prophetic tradition as transmitted by those first generation Muslims residing in Iraq. Thus, the Hanafi
Hanafi
school came to be known as the Kufan or Iraqi school in earlier times. Ali
Ali
and Abdullah, son of Masud
Abdullah, son of Masud
formed much of the base of the school, as well as other personalities from the direct relatives (or Ahli-ll-Bayṫ) of Moḥammad from whom Abu Hanifa
Abu Hanifa
had studied such as Muhammad
Muhammad
al-Baqir (thus apparently creating a link between Sunnis and Shias). Many jurists and historians had reportedly lived in Kufa, including one of Abu Hanifa's main teachers, Hammad ibn Abi Sulayman.[citation needed] Generational status[edit] Abū Ḥanīfah is regarded by some as one of the Tabi‘un, the generation after the Sahaba, who were the companions of the Islamic prophet, Muhammad. This is based on reports that he met at least four Sahaba
Sahaba
including Anas ibn Malik,[8] with some even reporting that he transmitted Hadith
Hadith
from him and other companions of Muhammad.[17][18] Others take the view that Abū Ḥanīfah only saw around half a dozen companions, possibly at a young age, and did not directly narrate hadith from them.[17] Abū Ḥanīfah was born 67 years after the death of Muhammad, but during the time of the first generation of Muslims, some of whom lived on until Abū Ḥanīfah's youth. Anas bin Malik, Muhammad's personal attendant, died in 93 AH and another companion, Abul Tufail Amir bin Wathilah, died in 100 AH, when Abū Ḥanīfah was 20 years old. The author of al-Khairat al-Hisan collected information from books of biographies and cited the names of Muslims of the first generation from whom it is reported that the Abu Hanifa
Abu Hanifa
had transmitted hadith. He counted them as sixteen, including Anas ibn Malik, Jabir ibn Abd-Allah and Sahl ibn Sa'd.[19] Reception[edit]

Map of the Muslim world. Hanafi
Hanafi
(grass green) is the Sunni school predominant in Turkey, the Northern Middle East, many parts of Egypt, Central Asia and most of the Indian subcontinent

Abu Hanifa
Abu Hanifa
ranks as one of the greatest jurists of Islamic civilization and one of the major legal philosophers of the entire human community.[20] He attained a very high status in the various fields of sacred knowledge and significantly influenced the development of Muslim theology.[21] During his lifetime he was acknowledged by the people as a jurist of the highest calibre.[22] Outside of his scholarly achievements Abu Hanifa
Abu Hanifa
is popularly known amongst Sunni Muslims
Sunni Muslims
as a man of the highest personal qualities: a performer of good works, remarkable for his self-denial, humble spirit, devotion and pious awe of God.[23] His tomb, surmounted by a dome erected by admirers in 1066 is still a shrine for pilgrims.[20] It was given a restoration in 1535 by Suleiman the Magnificent
Suleiman the Magnificent
upon the Ottoman conquest of Baghdad.[15] The honorific title al-Imam al-A'zam ("the greatest leader") was granted to him[24] both in communities where his legal theory is followed and elsewhere.[citation needed] According to John Esposito, 41% of all Muslims follow the Hanafi
Hanafi
school.[25] Abu Hanifa
Abu Hanifa
also had critics. The Zahiri
Zahiri
scholar Ibn Hazm
Ibn Hazm
quotes Sufyan ibn `Uyaynah: "[T]he affairs of men were in harmony until they were changed by Abù Hanìfa in Kùfa, al-Batti in Basra and Màlik in Medina".[26] Early Muslim jurist Hammad ibn Salamah once related a story about a highway robber who posed as an old man to hide his identity; he then remarked that were the robber still alive he would be a follower of Abu Hanifa.[27] Early Islam
Islam
scholars[edit]

v t e

Early Islamic scholars

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Muhammad
Muhammad
(570–632) prepared the Constitution of Medina, taught the Quran, and advised his companions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

`Abd Allah bin Masud (died 650) taught Ali
Ali
(607-661) fourth caliph taught Aisha, Muhammad's wife and Abu Bakr's daughter taught Abd Allah ibn Abbas
Abd Allah ibn Abbas
(618-687) taught Zayd ibn Thabit (610-660) taught Umar
Umar
(579-644) second caliph taught Abu Hurairah
Abu Hurairah
(603 – 681) taught

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alqama ibn Qays (died 681) taught

 

Husayn ibn Ali
Ali
(626–680) taught Qasim ibn Muhammad
Muhammad
ibn Abu Bakr
Abu Bakr
(657-725) taught and raised by Aisha Urwah ibn Zubayr
Urwah ibn Zubayr
(died 713) taught by Aisha, he then taught Said ibn al-Musayyib (637-715) taught Abdullah ibn Umar
Umar
(614-693) taught Abd Allah ibn al-Zubayr (624-692) taught by Aisha, he then taught

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ibrahim al-Nakha’i taught

 

 

Ali
Ali
ibn Husayn Zayn al-Abidin (659–712) taught

 

 

 

 

Hisham ibn Urwah (667-772) taught Ibn Shihab al-Zuhri (died 741) taught Salim ibn Abd-Allah ibn Umar
Umar
taught Umar
Umar
ibn Abdul Aziz (682-720) raised and taught by Abdullah ibn Umar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hammad bin ibi Sulman taught

 

 

Muhammad
Muhammad
al-Baqir (676-733) taught Farwah bint al-Qasim
Farwah bint al-Qasim
Abu Bakr's great grand daughter Jafar's mother

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Abu Hanifa
Abu Hanifa
(699 — 767) wrote Al Fiqh
Fiqh
Al Akbar and Kitab Al-Athar, jurisprudence followed by Sunni, Sunni Sufi, Barelvi, Deobandi, Zaidiyyah
Zaidiyyah
Shia and originally by the Fatimid and taught Zayd ibn Ali
Zayd ibn Ali
(695-740) Ja'far bin Muhammad
Muhammad
Al-Baqir (702–765) Ali's and Abu Bakr's great great grand son taught Malik ibn Anas
Malik ibn Anas
(711 – 795) wrote Muwatta, jurisprudence from early Medina
Medina
period now mostly followed by Sunni in Africa and taught

 

Al-Waqidi (748 – 822) wrote history books like Kitab al-Tarikh wa al-Maghazi, student of Malik ibn Anas Abu Muhammad
Muhammad
Abdullah ibn Abdul Hakam (died 829) wrote biographies and history books, student of Malik ibn Anas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Abu Yusuf
Abu Yusuf
(729-798) wrote Usul al-fiqh Muhammad al-Shaybani (749–805)

 

 

 

Al-Shafi‘i
Al-Shafi‘i
(767—820) wrote Al-Risala, jurisprudence followed by Sunni and taught Ismail ibn Ibrahim

 

Ali
Ali
ibn al-Madini (778–849) wrote The Book of Knowledge of the Companions

 

Ibn Hisham (died 833) wrote early history and As-Sirah an-Nabawiyyah, Muhammad's biography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Isma'il ibn Jafar
Isma'il ibn Jafar
(719-775) Musa al-Kadhim
Musa al-Kadhim
(745-799)

 

Ahmad ibn Hanbal
Ahmad ibn Hanbal
(780—855) wrote Musnad Ahmad ibn Hanbal jurisprudence followed by Sunni and hadith books Muhammad
Muhammad
al-Bukhari (810-870) wrote Sahih al-Bukhari
Sahih al-Bukhari
hadith books Muslim ibn al-Hajjaj
Muslim ibn al-Hajjaj
(815-875) wrote Sahih Muslim
Sahih Muslim
hadith books Muhammad
Muhammad
ibn Isa at-Tirmidhi (824-892) wrote Jami` at-Tirmidhi
Jami` at-Tirmidhi
hadith books Al-Baladhuri (died 892) wrote early history Futuh al-Buldan, Genealogies of the Nobles

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ibn Majah
Ibn Majah
(824- 887) wrote Sunan ibn Majah
Sunan ibn Majah
hadith book

 

Abu Dawood
Abu Dawood
(817–889) wrote Sunan Abu Dawood
Abu Dawood
Hadith
Hadith
Book

 

 

 

 

 

 

Muhammad
Muhammad
ibn Ya'qub al-Kulayni (864- 941) wrote Kitab al-Kafi
Kitab al-Kafi
hadith book followed by Twelver
Twelver
Shia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Muhammad
Muhammad
ibn Jarir al-Tabari (838–923) wrote History of the Prophets and Kings, Tafsir al-Tabari

 

Abu al-Hasan al- Ash'ari
Ash'ari
(874–936) wrote Maqālāt al-islāmīyīn, Kitāb al-luma, Kitāb al-ibāna 'an usūl al-diyāna

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ibn Babawayh
Ibn Babawayh
(923-991) wrote Man la yahduruhu al-Faqih
Man la yahduruhu al-Faqih
jurisprudence followed by Twelver
Twelver
Shia

 

Sharif Razi (930-977) wrote Nahj al-Balagha
Nahj al-Balagha
followed by Twelver
Twelver
Shia

 

Nasir al-Din al-Tusi
Nasir al-Din al-Tusi
(1201-1274) wrote jurisprudence books followed by Ismaili and Twelver
Twelver
Shia

 

 

Al-Ghazali
Al-Ghazali
(1058–1111) wrote The Niche for Lights, The Incoherence of the Philosophers, The Alchemy of Happiness on Sufism

 

Rumi
Rumi
(1207-1273) wrote Masnavi, Diwan-e Shams-e Tabrizi
Diwan-e Shams-e Tabrizi
on Sufism

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Key: Some of Muhammad's Companions Key: Taught in Medina Key: Taught in Iraq Key: Worked in Syria Key: Travelled extensively collecting the sayings of Muhammad
Muhammad
and compiled books of hadith Key: Worked in Iran

Works[edit]

Fiqh
Fiqh
al-Akbar Fiqh
Fiqh
al-Abasat Kitaab-ul-Aathaar narrated by Imam Muhammad al-Shaybani & Imam Abu Yusuf – compiled from a total of 70,000 hadith Aalim wa'l-muta‘allim At Tareeq Al Aslam Musnad Imam ul A’zam Abu Hanifah Kitaabul Rad alal Qaadiriyah

Confusion regarding Al- Fiqh
Fiqh
Al-Akbar[edit] The attribution of Al- Fiqh
Fiqh
Al-Akbar has been disputed by A.J. Wensick,[28] as well as Zubair Ali
Ali
Zai.[29] Other scholars have upheld that Abu Hanifa
Abu Hanifa
was the author such as Muhammad
Muhammad
Zahid Al-Kawthari, al-Bazdawi, and Abd al-Aziz al-Bukhari.[30] Scholars such as Mufti Abdur-Rahman have pointed out that the book being brought into question by Wensick is actually another work by Abu Hanifa called: "Al- Fiqh
Fiqh
Al-Absat".[30] Citations[edit]

^ a b c A.C. Brown, Jonathan (2014). Misquoting Muhammad: The Challenge and Choices of Interpreting the Prophet's Legacy. Oneworld Publications. pp. 24–5. ISBN 978-1780744209.  ^ Mohsen Zakeri (1995), Sasanid soldiers in early Muslim society: the origins of 'Ayyārān and Futuwwa, p.293 [1] ^ a b c d S. H. Nasr (1975), "The religious sciences", in R.N. Frye, The Cambridge History of Iran, Volume 4, Cambridge University Press. pg 474: "Abū Ḥanīfah, who is often called the "grand imam"(al-Imam al-'Azam) was Persian ^ a b c Cyril Glasse, "The New Encyclopedia of Islam", Published by Rowman & Littlefield, 2008. pg 23: "Abu Hanifah, a Persian, was one of the great jurists of Islam
Islam
and one of the historic Sunni Mujtahids" ^ ABŪ ḤANĪFA, Encyclopædia Iranica ^ a b c d e f g Pakatchi, Ahmad and Umar, Suheyl, “Abū Ḥanīfa”, in: Encyclopaedia Islamica, Editors-in-Chief: Wilferd Madelung and, Farhad Daftary. ^ Abu Bakr
Abu Bakr
al-Jassas al-Razi. Ahkam al-Quran. Dar Al-Fikr Al-Beirutiyya. pp. volume 1 page 100.  ^ a b Meri, Josef W. (2005-10-31). Medieval Islamic Civilization: An Encyclopedia. Routledge. p. 5. ISBN 9781135456030.  ^ Hisham M. Ramadan, Understanding Islamic Law: From Classical to Contemporary, (AltaMira Press: 2006), p.26 ^ "Oxford Islamic Studies Online". Abu Yusuf. Oxford University Press.  ^ Ya'qubi, vol. III, p.86; Muruj al-dhahab, vol. III, pp. 268–270. ^ Najeebabadi, Akbar S. (2001). The History of Islam. vol, 2. Darussalam Press. pp. 287. ISBN 9960-892-88-3. ^ Nemoy, Leon. (1952). Karaite Anthology: Excerpts from the Early Literature. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press. pp. 4-5. ISBN 0-300-00792-2. ^ Encyclopedia of the Ottoman Empire ^ a b Burak, Guy (2015). The Second Formation of Islamic Law: The Ḥanafī School in the Early Modern Ottoman Empire. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. 1. ISBN 978-1-107-09027-9.  ^ See: *Reuben Levy, Introduction to the Sociology of Islam, pg. 236–237. London: Williams and Norgate, 1931–1933. *Chiragh Ali, The Proposed Political, Legal and Social Reforms. Taken from Modernist Islam
Islam
1840–1940: A Sourcebook, pg. 280. Edited by Charles Kurzman. New York City: Oxford University Press, 2002. *Mansoor Moaddel, Islamic Modernism, Nationalism, and Fundamentalism: Episode and Discourse, pg. 32. Chicago: University of Chicago
Chicago
Press, 2005. *Keith Hodkinson, Muslim Family Law: A Sourcebook, pg. 39. Beckenham: Croom Helm Ltd., Provident House, 1984. *Understanding Islamic Law: From Classical to Contemporary, edited by Hisham Ramadan, pg. 18. Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield, 2006. *Christopher Roederrer and Darrel Moellendorf, Jurisprudence, pg. 471. Lansdowne: Juta and Company Ltd., 2007. *Nicolas Aghnides, Islamic Theories of Finance, pg. 69. New Jersey: Gorgias Press LLC, 2005. *Kojiro Nakamura, "Ibn Mada's Criticism of Arab Grammarians." Orient, v. 10, pgs. 89–113. 1974 ^ a b Imām-ul-A’zam Abū Ḥanīfah, The Theologian ^ http://www.islamicinformationcentre.co.uk/alsunna7.htm last accessed 8 June 2011 ^ "Imam-ul-A'zam Abū Ḥanīfah, The Theologian". Masud.co.uk. Archived from the original on 12 February 2010. Retrieved 2010-02-07.  ^ a b Magill, Frank Northen (1998-01-01). Dictionary of World Biography: The Middle Ages. Routledge. p. 18. ISBN 9781579580414.  ^ Magill, Frank Northen (1998-01-01). Dictionary of World Biography: The Middle Ages. Routledge. p. 17. ISBN 9781579580414.  ^ Hallaq, Wael B. (2005-01-01). The Origins and Evolution of Islamic Law. Cambridge University Press. p. 159. ISBN 9780521005807.  ^ Waines, David (2003-11-06). An Introduction to Islam. Cambridge University Press. p. 66. ISBN 9780521539067.  ^ Houtsma, M. Th (1993-01-01). E. J. Brill's First Encyclopaedia of Islam, 1913-1936. BRILL. p. 840. ISBN 9004097902.  ^ Esposito, John (2017). "The Muslim 500: The World's 500 Most Influential Muslims" (PDF). The Muslim 500. p. 32. Retrieved August 2, 2017.  ^ Camilla Adang, "This Day I have Perfected Your Religion For You: A Zahiri
Zahiri
Conception of Religious Authority," p.33. Taken from Speaking for Islam: Religious Authorities in Muslim Societies. Ed. Gudrun Krämer and Sabine Schmidtke. Leiden: Brill Publishers, 2006 ^ Ignác Goldziher, The Zahiris, pg. 15. Volume 3 of Brill Classics in Islam. Leiden: Brill Publishers, 2008. ISBN 9789004162419 ^ Wensick, A.J. (1932). The Muslim Creed. London: Cambridge University Press. p. 125.  ^ Zubair Ali
Ali
ZaiIs Fiqh
Fiqh
ul-Akbar Imaam Abu Haneefah's book. Taken from The Story of the Fabricated book and the Rabbaanee Scholars, pg. 19–20. Trns. Abu Hibbaan and Abu Khuzaimah Ansaari. ^ a b Ibn Yusuf Mangera, Mufti Abdur-Rahman (November 2007). Imam Abu Hanifa's Al- Fiqh
Fiqh
Al-Akbar Explained (First ed.). California, USA: White Thread Press. pp. 24–35. ISBN 978-1-933764-03-0. 

References[edit]

Wikiquote has quotations related to: Abu Hanifa

al-Quduri, Ahmad ibn Muhammad
Muhammad
(2010). Mukhtasar al-Quduri. Translated by Tahir Mahmood al-Kiani (First ed.). Ta-Ha Publishers Ltd. ISBN 1842001183.  Nu'mani, Shibli (1998). Imām Abū Ḥanīfah — Life and Works. Translated by M. Hadi Hussain. Islamic Book Service, New Delhi. ISBN 81-85738-59-9.  Abdur-Rahman ibn Yusuf, Imam Abu Hanifa's Al- Fiqh
Fiqh
Al-Akbar Explained

External links[edit]

The Life of Imam Abu Hanifa
Abu Hanifa
Biography at Lost Islamic History Imam Abu Hanifa
Abu Hanifa
by Jamil Ahmad Al-Wasiyyah of Imam Abu Hanifah Translated into English by Shaykh Imam Tahir Mahmood al-Kiani Book on Imam e Azam Abu Hanifa
Abu Hanifa
(Urdu) Abu Hanifa
Abu Hanifa
on Muslim heritage Imām Abū Ḥanīfah By Shiekh G. F. Haddad Some teachers and students of Imam Abu Hanifa

v t e

Islamic theology

Fields Theologians Books

Fields

Aqidah ‘aql Astronomy Cosmology Eschatology Ethics Kalam Fiqh Logic in philosophy Peace in philosophy Philosophy Physics Philosophy of education

Theologians

Abd al-Jabbar ibn Ahmad Abd al-Qadir al-Jilani Abdul Hosein Amini Abdulhakim Arvasi Abū Ḥanīfa Abu l-A‘la Mawdudi Abu Yusuf Ahmad ibn Hanbal Ahmad Sirhindi Ahmad Yasavi Ahmed Raza Khan Barelvi Akhtar Raza Khan al-Ash‘ari al-Ballūṭī al-Baydawi al-Dhahabi al-Ghazali al-Hilli al-Jahiz al-Jubba'i al-Kindi al-Masudi al-Maturidi al-Mufid Al-Qasim al-Qushayri al-Razi Al-Shafi‘i al-Shahrastani al-Shirazi al-Tirmidhi Allameh Majlesi Amr ibn Ubayd Dawud al-Zahiri Fazlur Rahman Malik Hasan of Basra Hacı Bayram-ı Veli Haji Bektash Veli Hüseyin Hilmi Işık ibn ‘Arabī ibn al-Jawzi ibn ‘Aqil ibn Hazm ibn Qudamah Ibn Taymiyyah Ja’far al-Sadiq Jalal al-Din Muhammad
Muhammad
Rumi Malik ibn Anas Mahmud Hudayi Morteza Motahhari Muhammad
Muhammad
al-Baqir Muhammad
Muhammad
al-Nafs al-Zakiyya Muhammad
Muhammad
Baqir al-Sadr Muhammed Hamdi Yazır Muhammad
Muhammad
Hamidullah Muhammad
Muhammad
ibn al-Hanafiyyah Muhammad
Muhammad
Tahir-ul-Qadri Muhammad
Muhammad
Taqi Usmani Nasir Khusraw Sadr al-Din al-Qunawi Said Nursî Shaykh Tusi Sheikh Bedreddin Wasil ibn Ata Zayd ibn Ali Zayn al-Abidin

Key books

Crucial Sunni books

al-Irshad al- Aqidah
Aqidah
al-Tahawiyyah

Buyruks Kitab al Majmu Masnavi Nahj al-Balagha Epistles of Wisdom Risale-i Nur

Schools

Sunni

Ash'ari Maturidi Traditionalism

Shia

Kaysanites

Mukhtar

Abu Muslim Sunpadh Ishaq al-Turk

Muhammerah

Khurramites

Babak Mazyar Ismail I / Pir Sultan Abdal
Pir Sultan Abdal
– Qizilbash / Safavid conversion of Iran to Shia Islam

al-Muqanna

Zaidiyyah

Jarudi Batriyya Alid dynasties of northern Iran

Hasan al-Utrush

List of extinct Shia sects

Dukayniyya Khalafiyya Khashabiyya

Imami Isma'ilism

Batiniyyah

Sevener Qarmatians Hamza / al-Muqtana Baha'uddin / ad-Darazi – Druzes

Musta'li

Hafizi Taiyabi

Nizari

Assassins Nizaris

Nasir Khusraw
Nasir Khusraw
Badakhshan
Badakhshan
Alevism

Imami Twelver

Theology of Twelvers

Ja'fari

Akhbari Shaykhi Usuli

Alevism

Qutb ad-Dīn Haydar
Qutb ad-Dīn Haydar
– Qalandariyya Baba Ishak
Baba Ishak
– Babai Revolt Galip Hassan Kuscuoglu
Galip Hassan Kuscuoglu
– Rifa'i-Galibi Order

Ghulat

al-Khaṣībī / ibn Nusayr – Alawites Fazlallah Astarabadi (Naimi) / Imadaddin Nasimi
Imadaddin Nasimi
– Hurufism / Bektashism and folk religion

Independent

Ibadi

ibn Ibāḍ Jābir ibn Zayd

Jabriyyah

Ibn Safwan

Murji'ah Karramiyya Qadariyah

Ma'bad al-Juhani Muʿtazila Bahshamiyya

Khawarij

Azariqa Najdat Sufri

Abu Qurra

Nakkariyyah

Abu Yazid

Haruriyyah

v t e

Muslim scholars of the Hanafi
Hanafi
School

by century (AH CE)

2nd/8th

Abu Hanifa
Abu Hanifa
(founder of the school) Abdullah ibn Mubarak Abu Yusuf Muhammad
Muhammad
al-Shaybani Yahya ibn Ma'in

3rd/9th

Abu Mansur al-Maturidi Al-Tahawi Isa ibn Aban Yahya ibn Aktham

4th/10th

Abu Laith Al-Jaṣṣās

5th/11th

Ali
Ali
Hujwiri Sarakhsi

6th/12th

Abu Hafs Umar
Umar
an-Nasafi Burhan al-Din al-Marghinani

7th/13th

Rumi

8th/14th

Al-Hakim al-Tirmidhi Al-Ḫaṣṣāf Badr al-Din al-Ayni Ibn Abi al-Izz Mulla Shams ad-Din al-Fanari Uthman
Uthman
bin Ali
Ali
Zayla'i

10th/16th

Abdul-Haqq Dehlavi Abu Sa'ud al-Ḥanafi Ahmad Sirhindi Ali
Ali
al-Qari Ibrāhīm al-Ḥalabī

11th/17th

Abd al-Ghani al-Nabulsi Khayr al-Din al-Ramli Qazi Syed Rafi Mohammad

12th/18th

Makhdoom Muhammad
Muhammad
Hashim Thattvi Murtada al-Zabidi Qazi Syed Inayatullah Qazi Syed Mohammad Rafi Qazi Syed Mohammad Zaman Shah Abdul Aziz Shah Waliullah Dehlawi Syed Hayatullah Syed Mohammad Ashraf

13th/19th

Abd Allah ibn Abbas
Abd Allah ibn Abbas
ibn Siddiq Al-Maydani Ahmed Raza Khan Barelvi Haji Dost Muhammad
Muhammad
Qandhari Ibn Abidin Khalil Ahmad Saharanpuri Meher Ali
Ali
Shah Rashid Ahmad Gangohi Shibli Nomani Yusuf Ma Dexin Ashraf Ali
Ali
Thanwi Husain Ahmad Madani Anwar Shah Kashmiri Shabbir Ahmad Usmani Muhammad
Muhammad
Zakariya Kandhlawi Mahmud al-Hasan

14th/20th

Abd Allah Siraj Abdul Hamid Qadri Badayuni Abdul Haq Kanthapuram A.P. Aboobacker Musliyar Abul Hasan Ali
Ali
Hasani Nadwi Akhtar Raza Khan Arshadul Qaudri Asad Muhammad
Muhammad
Saeed as-Sagharji Azizul Haque Faraz Rabbani Ghulam Rasool Jamaati Hamid Raza Khan Mohammad Abdul Ghafoor Hazarvi Muhammad
Muhammad
Abdul Malek Muhammad
Muhammad
Idrees Dahiri Muhammad
Muhammad
Masihullah Khan Muhammad
Muhammad
Taqi Usmani Muhammad
Muhammad
Zahid Al-Kawthari Muntakhib al-Haqq Mustafa Raza Khan Qadri Nurul Islam
Islam
Farooqi Qamaruzzaman Azmi Qazi Mian Muhammad
Muhammad
Amjad Shabbir Ahmad Usmani Shah Saeed Ahmed Raipuri Syed Shujaat Ali
Ali
Qadri Yusuf Motala

Scholars of other Sunni Islamic schools of jurisprudence

Hanbali Maliki Shafi'i Zahiri

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 88126052 LCCN: n82031776 ISNI: 0000 0001 1577 0954 GND: 11899204X SELIBR: 175991 SUDOC: 119722321 BNF:

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