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The Info List - AADT


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ANNUAL AVERAGE DAILY TRAFFIC, abbreviated AADT, is a measure used primarily in transportation planning and transportation engineering . Traditionally, it is the total volume of vehicle traffic of a highway or road for a year divided by 365 days. AADT is a useful and simple measurement of how busy the road is. Newer advances from traffic data providers are now providing AADT by side of the road, by day of week and by time of day.

CONTENTS

* 1 Uses * 2 Data collection * 3 Annual Average Weekday Traffic (AAWT) * 4 Average summer daily traffic * 5 Average Daily Traffic * 6 References * 7 External links

USES

Highway
Highway
401 in Ontario, Canada
Ontario, Canada
, has an AADT of over 400,000 in some sections of Toronto
Toronto
.

One of the most important uses of AADT is for determining funding for the maintenance and improvement of highways.

In the United States the amount of federal funding a state will receive is related to the total traffic measured across its highway network. Each year on June 15, every state in the United States submits a Highway
Highway
Performance Monitoring System HPMS report. The HPMS report contains various information regarding the road segments in the state based on a sample (not all of the road segments) of the road segments. In the report, the AADT is converted to vehicle miles traveled (VMT). VMT is the AADT multiplied by the length of the road segment. To determine the amount of traffic a state has, the AADT cannot be summed for all road segments since an AADT is a rate. The VMT is summed and is used as an indicator of the amount of traffic a state has. For federal-funding, formulas are applied to include the VMT and other highway statistics.

In the United Kingdom AADT is one of a number of measures of traffic used by local highway authorities, Highways England and the Department for Transport to forecast maintenance needs and expenditure.

DATA COLLECTION

A traffic counter on BIA Road
Road
J-9 in the United States

To measure AADT on individual road segments, traffic data is collected either by an automated traffic counter or hiring an observer to record traffic. There are two different techniques of measuring the AADTs for road segments. One technique is called continuous count data collection method. This is where sensors are permanently embedded into a road and traffic data is measured all 365 days. The AADT would be the sum of the total traffic for the entire year divided by 365 days. There is a problem with calculating the AADT with this method. The continuous count equipment is not operating for the full 365 days due to being shut down for maintenance or repair. Because of this, seasonal or day-of-week biases might skew the calculated AADT. In 1992, AASHTO released the AASHTO Guidelines for Traffic Data Programs, which identified a way to produce an AADT without seasonal or day-of-week biases by creating an "average of averages." For every month and day-of-week, a Monthly Average Day of Week (MADW) is calculated (84 per year). Each day-of-week's MADW is then calculated across months to calculate an Annual Average Day of Week (AADW) (7 per year). Finally, the AADWs are averaged to calculate an AADT. The United States Fe