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The 2000 World Series was the 96th edition of Major League Baseball (MLB)'s championship series,[1] and the conclusion of the 2000 Major League Baseball season. A best-of-seven playoff, it featured a crosstown matchup between the two-time defending World Series champions and American League (AL) champion New York Yankees and the National League (NL) champion New York Mets. The Yankees defeated the Mets four games to one to win their third consecutive championship and 26th overall. It marks, to date, the last World Series with a repeat champion. It was the first postseason Subway Series since 1956. The Yankees were in the World Series for the third consecutive season and fourth in the past five years, and 37th overall. This made it the most of any team in MLB. The Mets qualified to play in the World Series for the fourth time in franchise history, making this the most of any expansion franchise in MLB and its first since winning the 1986 World Series. This is the most recent World Series in which both participating teams had made the postseason the previous year. Under the new Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA) between MLB and the new World Umpires Association signed in 2000, the traditional separate National League and American League umpiring staffs were discontinued. All umpires were now consolidated into the Major League Baseball umbrella, with an interim uniform used during the regular season. During the 2000 postseason, the new umpire uniforms (black and cream shirts), with the Major League Baseball logo on the caps and shirts, were used for the first time. The Yankees were the first team in baseball to three-peat as champions since the 1972–1974 Oakland Athletics and the first professional sports team to accomplish the feat since the 1996–1998 Chicago Bulls.

Contents

1 Background

1.1 New York Yankees 1.2 New York Mets

2 Summary 3 Matchups

3.1 Game 1 3.2 Game 2 3.3 Game 3 3.4 Game 4 3.5 Game 5

4 Composite box 5 Aftermath 6 Records 7 Radio and television

7.1 Ratings

8 DVD 9 Notes 10 See also 11 References 12 External links

Background[edit] New York Yankees[edit] Main article: 2000 New York Yankees season Although the Yankees were in the midst of a dynasty and not far removed from their dominant 114-win 1998 season, the 2000 season was their weakest performance since 1995. They won just 87 games in the regular season and lost 15 of their last 18 games, closing 2000 with a seven-game losing streak. Many players who were great in 1998 (Tino Martinez, Paul O'Neill, Scott Brosius, Chuck Knoblauch, and David Cone) had below-average seasons in 2000. Nonetheless, strong seasons by Jorge Posada, Derek Jeter, Bernie Williams, and Mariano Rivera were enough to secure the AL East by 2.5 games. In the post-season, they defeated the Oakland Athletics in the AL Division Series 3-2 and the Seattle Mariners in the AL Championship Series 4-2 to reach the World Series. At the time, they were just the fourth team since 1960 to make the World Series after winning fewer than 90 games in the regular season.[note 1] New York Mets[edit] Main article: 2000 New York Mets season Highlighted by MVP-caliber seasons from Edgardo Alfonzo and Mike Piazza as well as strong pitching performances from Al Leiter and Mike Hampton, the New York Mets won 94 games in the regular season to capture the Wild Card by 8 games (though they lost the NL East to the Atlanta Braves by 1 game). By winning the 1999 and 2000 Wild Card, the Mets achieved their first back-to-back post-season appearances in franchise history, a feat they would match in 2015 and 2016. The Mets defeated the 97-game winning San Francisco Giants in the NL Division Series, 3–1, and the 95-game winning St. Louis Cardinals, 4–1, in the NL Championship Series. The 2000 World Series was the first World Series appearance for the Mets since their championship in 1986 and their second post-season appearance since 1988. Summary[edit] AL New York Yankees (4) vs. NL New York Mets (1)

Game Date Score Location Time Attendance 

1 October 21 New York Mets – 3, New York Yankees – 4 (12 innings) Yankee Stadium 4:51 55,913[2] 

2 October 22 New York Mets – 5, New York Yankees – 6 Yankee Stadium 3:30 56,059[3] 

3 October 24 New York Yankees – 2, New York Mets – 4 Shea Stadium 3:39 55,299[4] 

4 October 25 New York Yankees – 3, New York Mets – 2 Shea Stadium 3:20 55,290[5] 

5 October 26 New York Yankees – 4, New York Mets – 2 Shea Stadium 3:32 55,292[6]

Matchups[edit] Game 1[edit]

Saturday, October 21, 2000 8:00 pm (EDT) at Yankee Stadium in Bronx, New York

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 R H E

New York Mets (NL) 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 3 10 0

New York Yankees (AL) 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 4 12 0

WP: Mike Stanton (1–0)   LP: Turk Wendell (0–1)

The opener fell on two anniversaries. Twenty-five years prior, Boston Red Sox catcher Carlton Fisk ended Game 6 of the 1975 World Series with his famous home run off the left-field foul pole in Fenway Park to beat the Cincinnati Reds and force a Game 7. Twenty years prior, the Philadelphia Phillies won their first World Series title, defeating the Kansas City Royals in six games.

NYCS R36 WF subway series 2000 Mets

Game 1 was a match-up between postseason veterans Al Leiter and Andy Pettitte. Both pitched scoreless ball until the sixth inning when David Justice's two-run double put the Yankees on top. In the top of the seventh, the Mets loaded the bases off Pettitte with one out on two singles and a walk before Bubba Trammell tied the game with a two-run single to left. After Timo Perez's sacrifice bunt moved up the runners, Jeff Nelson relieved Pettitte and allowed an RBI single to Edgardo Alfonzo to put the Mets on top. However, in the ninth, the Yankees tied the game on Chuck Knoblauch's bases-loaded sacrifice fly against Mets closer Armando Benítez. With the bases loaded, José Vizcaíno drove in Tino Martinez in the 12th inning against Turk Wendell with his fourth hit of the game to win it for the Yankees. Game 2[edit]

Sunday, October 22, 2000 8:00 pm (EDT) at Yankee Stadium in Bronx, New York

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E

New York Mets (NL) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 5 7 3

New York Yankees (AL) 2 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 X 6 12 1

WP: Roger Clemens (1–0)   LP: Mike Hampton (0–1) Home runs: NYM: Mike Piazza (1), Jay Payton (1) NYY: Scott Brosius (1)

Roger Clemens started for the Yankees. Earlier in the year, during Interleague play, Clemens had hit Mets catcher Mike Piazza in the head with a fastball that resulted in a concussion and Piazza going on the disabled list. Early in Game 2, during Piazza's first time up, a Clemens pitch shattered Piazza's bat. The ball went foul, but a sharp edge of the bat came towards Clemens. He came off the mound and threw the bat towards the baseline, almost hitting the running Piazza. Piazza appeared baffled by Clemens' actions. After the game, Clemens would say he did not see Piazza running and threw the bat because he was pumped up with nervous energy and initially charged the incoming broken bat, believing it to be the ball. The Yankees struck in the bottom of the first when Mets starter Mike Hampton walked two with outs before RBI singles by Tino Martinez and Jorge Posada put them up 2–0. Scott Brosius's leadoff home run next inning made it 3–0. Martinez doubled in the fifth and, after an intentional walk, scored on Paul O'Neill's single. In the seventh, reliever Glendon Rusch allowed a one-out single to Posada and subsequent double to O'Neill. Rick White relieved Rusch and allowed a sacrifice fly to Brosius. In the eighth, Derek Jeter doubled with one out off of White, who was relieved by Dennis Cook and allowed an RBI single to Martinez. Clemens pitched eight shutout innings, allowing just two hits (both singles by Todd Zeile) while striking out nine. In the ninth, Jeff Nelson relieved Clemens and allowed a leadoff single to Edgardo Alfonzo before Piazza homered to make it 6–2 Yankees. After Robin Ventura singled, Mariano Rivera relieved Nelson. He retired Zeile, allowed a single to Benny Agbayani and then, after Lenny Harris hit into a force-out at home, Jay Payton's three-run home run cut the Yankee lead to 6–5. Rivera struck out Kurt Abbott looking to end the game, earn a save, and give the Yankees a 2–0 series lead heading to Shea Stadium. The Yankees' Game 2 win tied the longest AL winning streak in the World Series at ten games (the AL had previously won ten straight 1927–29 and again 1937–40). Game 3[edit]

Tuesday, October 24, 2000 8:18 pm (EDT) at Shea Stadium in Queens, New York

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E

New York Yankees (AL) 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 8 0

New York Mets (NL) 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 X 4 9 0

WP: John Franco (1–0)   LP: Orlando Hernández (0–1)   Sv: Armando Benítez (1) Home runs: NYY: None NYM: Robin Ventura (1)

In Game 3, Robin Ventura's leadoff home run in the second off of Orlando Hernandez gave the Mets a 1–0 lead, but the Yankees tied it in the third when Derek Jeter singled with two outs off of Rick Reed and scored on David Justice's double. Next inning, Tino Martinez hit a leadoff single and scored on Paul O'Neill's one-out triple, but the Mets tied the game in the sixth when Mike Piazza hit a leadoff double and after a walk, scored on Todd Zeile's double. In the eighth, Zeile singled with one out and scored on Benny Agbayani's double. After Jay Payton singled, Mike Stanton relieved Hernandez and allowed a sacrifice fly to Bubba Trammell to pad the Mets lead. Closer Armando Benitez pitched a scoreless ninth despite allowing a leadoff single to Chuck Knoblauch as the Mets' 4–2 win ended the Yankees' fourteen-game winning streak in World Series play dating back to the 1996 World Series.

NYCS R142 subway series 2000 Yankees

Yankee hurler Orlando "El Duque" Hernandez earned the loss, snapping his previous undefeated postseason record of 6–0. Game 4[edit]

Wednesday, October 25, 2000 8:18 pm (EDT) at Shea Stadium in Queens, New York

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E

New York Yankees (AL) 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 8 0

New York Mets (NL) 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 6 1

WP: Jeff Nelson (1–0)   LP: Bobby Jones (0–1)   Sv: Mariano Rivera (1) Home runs: NYY: Derek Jeter (1) NYM: Mike Piazza (2)

Before Game 3, some analysts felt the tide had changed, that the Mets (down 2–1 in the Series) were now geared with enough momentum to make a comeback. That momentum lasted only until the first pitch from Mets starter Bobby Jones, which Jeter hit far into Shea Stadium's left-field bleachers. It was the 16th leadoff homer in World Series history, also extending a 13-game hitting streak in the World Series for Jeter. The Yankees added to their lead when Paul O'Neill tripled with one out in the second and .after an intentional walk, scored on Scott Brosius's sacrifice fly. In the third, Jeter hit a leadoff triple and scored on Luis Sojo's groundout. Mike Piazza's two-run home run off of Denny Neagle cut the Yankees' lead to 3–2, but neither team would score after that. The Yankees secured a dominant 3–1 lead in the Series, with elite pitchers Andy Pettite and Roger Clemens poised for Games 5 and 6 (if necessary). With this win, the Yankees had effectively killed all hope for the Mets.[5] A now-iconic moment in Yankees lore, footage of Jeter's leadoff home run, currently serves as the background for the title screen of YES Network's Yankeeography series.[7] Game 5[edit]

Thursday, October 26, 2000 8:18 pm (EDT) at Shea Stadium in Queens, New York

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E

New York Yankees (AL) 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 4 7 1

New York Mets (NL) 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 8 1

WP: Mike Stanton (2–0)   LP: Al Leiter (0–1)   Sv: Mariano Rivera (2) Home runs: NYY: Bernie Williams (1), Derek Jeter (2) NYM: None

Looking to clinch, the Yankees scored first on a Bernie Williams solo home run in the second inning. In the bottom half, however, with runners on second and third and two outs, Andy Pettitte's fielding error on Al Leiter's bunt attempt allowed the Mets to tie the score. Benny Agbayani's RBI single then put them up 2–1. In the top of the sixth, Derek Jeter homered to tie the game at 2–2. The Series effectively ended in the top of the ninth. Mets ace Al Leiter had a pitch count that was approaching 140, but manager Bobby Valentine insisted that he would live or die with Leiter. After striking out Tino Martinez and Paul O'Neill, Leiter walked Jorge Posada and allowed a single to Scott Brosius. Yankee infielder Luis Sojo then singled to center, and the throw from center fielder Jay Payton hit Posada as he was sliding into home plate. The ball went into the Yankees' dugout, allowing Brosius to score as well and Luis Sojo to take third base. This put the Yankees on top 4–2. In the bottom of the ninth, the Mets' best hitter, Piazza, dramatically faced Yankee closer Mariano Rivera as the tying run with two outs. Piazza hit a deep fly ball, but it was caught in the deepest part of the ballpark by Bernie Williams to end the game at exactly midnight. It gave the Yankees their third straight world title and fourth in five years. Of Piazza's fly ball, many thought it was a home run. Yankees manager Joe Torre said:

It was probably the most scared I've been when Mike hit that ball ... I screamed, "No!" Because any time he hits a ball in the air, it's a home run in my mind. I saw Bernie trotting over for that. I said, "Wow! I guess I misread that one."[8]

Yankees catcher Jorge Posada similarly said, years later:

I remember it was a loud sound ... It was a pitch that got too much of the plate. It was supposed to be inside. I remember the swing, I remember Mo’s reaction. And then I looked at the ball and I see Bernie running after it, and then he stopped. And I’m like, O.K., we’re good.[9]

However, Bernie Williams, after the game, with champagne pouring over him, said, "I knew right away ... I knew he didn't hit it.[10]" Likewise, Mariano Rivera in his last season (2013) was asked if he thought Piazza had hit a home run and answered, "No ... He didn't hit it with the sweet spot." [11] Game 5 was the final World Series game at Shea Stadium (1969, 1973, 1986 and 2000). This would also be the only time that visiting teams won a World Series at Shea Stadium (the Mets lost in 1973 in Oakland). This World Series provided some measure of revenge for Roger Clemens. He won the World Series in the same stadium he lost it at in 1986 while with the Yankees' fierce rival, the Boston Red Sox. Incidentally, members of the 1986 Mets World Series team threw out the ceremonial first pitch before the game.[12][13][14] Composite box[edit]

Artwork from the Daily News featuring Derek Jeter & Mike Piazza

The New York City Subway promoted rapid transit usage for the 2000 "Subway Series." The D and 4 served Yankee Stadium and the 7 served Shea Stadium.

2000 World Series (4–1): New York Yankees (A.L.) over New York Mets (N.L.)

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 R H E

New York Yankees 3 3 2 1 1 3 1 1 3 0 0 1 19 47 2

New York Mets 0 3 2 0 0 1 3 2 5 0 0 0 16 40 5

Total attendance: 277,853   Average attendance: 55,571 Winning player's share: $294,783   Losing player's share: $238,654[15]

Aftermath[edit] 2000 would be the last World Series title the Yankees would win for nine years, though they would remain competitive each year.[note 2] They lost the 2001 World Series to the Arizona Diamondbacks in seven games and the 2003 World Series to the Florida Marlins in six games. The 2000 World Series was the last hurrah for this Mets core that consisted of Piazza, Leiter, Franco, Alfonzo, Ventura, and manager Bobby Valentine. After four consecutive seasons of competitive baseball,[note 3] the Mets would average just 74 wins in the next four seasons, including a 95-loss season in 2003 and two last-place finishes in the NL East (2002 and 2003). After 2002, Bobby Valentine and nearly all of the coaching staff were fired, and by 2005, Mike Piazza was the only remnant from the 2000 team; he would leave the Mets after that season. The Mets have made three postseason appearances since then. The first occurred in 2006, when they lost the NLCS to the eventual champions, the St. Louis Cardinals; the second came in 2015, as NL East champions, when they made a return trip to the World Series and lost to the Kansas City Royals (also in five games); the third took place in 2016 when they lost to the San Francisco Giants in the National League Wild Card game. This was the final World Series the New York Yankees won while playing at the old Yankee Stadium (as previously mentioned, they lost in 2001 and again in 2003) and the final World Series played at Shea Stadium. Both stadiums closed at the end of the 2008 Major League Baseball season. The first season at the new Yankee Stadium (2009) ended with the Yankees winning their 27th; meanwhile, the 2015 New York Mets hosted their first-ever World Series at Citi Field, where they lost to the Kansas City Royals in five games. Derek Jeter was the last active player involved in the 2000 World Series. He retired following the 2014 season. Some players, like Robin Ventura and Joe McEwing, currently work as coaches. Records[edit]

The 1998–2000 New York Yankees established a record of ten consecutive games won in consecutive World Series. The previous record was nine by the 1937–1939 Yankees. Overall, the Yankees had won fourteen straight World Series games (starting with Game 3 of the 1996 World Series) breaking the mark of twelve straight by the 1927, 1928 and 1932 Yankees. Mariano Rivera became the first and, to date, only pitcher to record the final out in three straight World Series. In 1998, he retired the Padres' Mark Sweeney to clinch the championship; in 1999, he retired the Braves' Keith Lockhart; and in 2000, he retired the Mets' Mike Piazza.

Radio and television[edit] The World Series telecast on Fox was the first year of their exclusive coverage of the Fall Classic (although the new contract would technically begin the next year). As in previous World Series televised by the network, Joe Buck provided the play-by-play with Bob Brenly and Tim McCarver (himself a Yankees broadcaster and a former Mets broadcaster) as color commentators. Game 5 of the series was Brenly's last broadcast for Fox, as he left to become manager of the Arizona Diamondbacks and, incidentally, go on to defeat the Yankees in the World Series the following year. Brenly returned to broadcasting in 2005 as part of the Chicago Cubs broadcasts on CSN Chicago and WGN, and also has called postseason games for TBS. ESPN Radio's coverage was without Joe Morgan for a second consecutive year for reasons that remain unclear. Instead, Jon Miller shared the booth with Dave Campbell, ESPN Radio's Sunday Night Baseball color man. In 1999, Morgan was absent from ESPN Radio's World Series coverage because he was working the television broadcasts with Bob Costas on NBC. During Game 3, Miller was forced to leave the booth after the top of the first inning due to an upper respiratory infection. Charley Steiner, serving as a field reporter for the network, filled in on play-by-play for the rest of the game; Miller resumed his duties in Game 4 of the Series.[16] Ratings[edit] The World Series drew an average of 12.4 national rating and a 21% share of the audience, down 22.5% from the previous year. The Series drew well in the New York metropolitan area, but nationally, it was, at the time, the lowest-rated World Series in history by a solid margin. Many contemporary analysts argued that the ratings slide was due to lack of interest outside of New York City.[17] Others thought the ratings slide was related to the television viewing audience becoming more fragmented in the wake of cable television. Online streaming media services were in their infancy and were a non-factor in 2000. Three of the next four World Series (2001, 2003 and 2004) were all rated higher than the 2000 World Series. Following the Boston Red Sox' 86-year championship drought ending with a victory in the 2004 World Series, the event has seen a decline in ratings; every World Series from 2005 to 2013 has drawn lower ratings (sometimes substantially lower) than the 2000 Series.

Game Ratings (households) Share (households) American audience (in millions)

1 11.5 22 17.56

2 12.6 20 19.05

3 12.4 21 17.45

4 12.5 21 17.61

5 13.1 21 18.93

DVD[edit] On October 11, 2005, A&E Home Video released The New York Yankees Fall Classic Collectors Edition (1996–2001) DVD set. Game 5 of the 2000 World Series is included in the set. The entire series was released in October 2013 by Lionsgate Home Entertainment [18] Notes[edit]

^ The 1997 Indians won 86 games, the 1987 Twins won 85 games, and the 1973 Mets won 82 games. ^ From 2001-2012, the Yankees would make the playoffs every year except 2008 ^ The Mets missed the post-season by 1 game in 1997 and 1998, they made the NLCS in 1999, and they made the World Series in 2000

See also[edit]

2000 Japan Series

References[edit]

Inline citations

^ "2000 World Series". Baseball-Reference. Retrieved January 6, 2014.  ^ "2000 World Series Game 1 - New York Mets vs. New York Yankees". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.  ^ "2000 World Series Game 2 - New York Mets vs. New York Yankees". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.  ^ "2000 World Series Game 3 - New York Yankees vs. New York Mets". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.  ^ a b "2000 World Series Game 4 - New York Yankees vs. New York Mets". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.  ^ "2000 World Series Game 5 - New York Yankees vs. New York Mets". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.  ^ http://www.dvdtalk.com/reviews/images/reviews/103/1098159064.jpg ^ "Sports - Champions belong in any discussion of greatest teams - Seattle Times Newspaper".  ^ "Timeless Sport's Final Moments". The New York Times. November 3, 2009.  ^ "Rivera and Rest of Pen Did Job When Needed". The New York Times. October 27, 2000.  ^ "Mariano meets with Mets fans, employees".  ^ "Yanks' fans celebrate as Mets' mourn". USA Today. October 27, 2000. p. 6C. Briefly: Members of the New York Mets' 1986 World Series champions—catcher Gary Carter, first baseman Keith Hernandez, outfielders Lenny Dykstra and Mookie Wilson and pitcher Ron Darling—took part in the ceremonial first pitch.  ^ Graves, Gary (October 27, 2000). "Mets invoke grit of 1986 champs". USA Today.  ^ Salisbury, Jim (October 27, 2000). "Ex-Phillie Dykstra Still a Mets Dude". Philadelphia Inquirer. p. D1.  ^ "World Series Gate Receipts and Player Shares". Baseball Almanac. Archived from the original on May 2, 2009. Retrieved June 14, 2009.  ^ Zipay, Steve (October 26, 2000). "Going Yard, Off Guard". Newsday.  ^ "Subway Series is lowest-rated Fall Classic in history". CNN.  ^ "2000 Yankees World Series Collector's Edition". Home Theater Forum. 

Bibliography

The subway series: the Yankees, the Mets and a season to remember. St. Louis, Mo.: The Sporting News. 2000. ISBN 0-89204-659-7. 

External links[edit]

2000 World Series at WorldSeries.com (MLB.com) 2000 World Series at Baseball Almanac 2000 World Series at Baseball-Reference.com The 2000 Post-Season Games (box scores and play-by-play) at Retrosheet History of the World Series - 2000 at The SportingNews. Archived from the original on 2008. World Series > Subway Series

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DirecTV N3D FoxBox FoxTrax Scooter Television contracts (cable) MLB Network World Series television ratings

National coverage

Fox (1996–present) FS1 (2014–present) FS2 (2014–present) Fox Deportes (2012–present) Fox Family Channel (2001) Fox Sports Net (1997–1999) FX (1997)

FSN affiliates

Arizona (Arizona Diamondbacks) Detroit (Detroit Tigers) Florida (Miami Marlins & Tampa Bay Rays) Kansas City (Kansas City Royals) Midwest (St. Louis Cardinals) North (Minnesota Twins) Ohio (Cincinnati Reds) San Diego (San Diego Padres) South (Atlanta Braves) Southeast (Atlanta Braves) Southwest (Texas Rangers) West (Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim) Wisconsin (Milwaukee Brewers) Sun (Miami Marlins & Tampa Bay Rays) SportsTime Ohio (Cleveland Indians) YES Network (New York Yankees)

Former FSN affiliates

Bay Area (Oakland Athletics & San Francisco Giants; 1998–2007) Chicago (Chicago Cubs & Chicago White Sox, 1998–2006) Houston (Houston Astros, 2009-2012) New York (New York Mets, 1998–2005) Rocky Mountain (Colorado Rockies, 1997-2010)

Fox/MyTV O&O Stations

New York City: WNYW 5 (Yankees, 1999–2001), WWOR 9 (N.Y. Giants, 1951–1957; Brooklyn Dodgers, 1950–1957; Mets, 1962–1998; Yankees, 2005–2014) Los Angeles: KTTV 11 (Dodgers, 1958–1992), KCOP 13 (Dodgers, 2002–2005; Angels, 2006–2012) Chicago: WFLD 32 (White Sox, 1968–1972, 1982–1989) Philadelphia: WTXF 29 (Phillies, 1983–1989) Dallas–Fort Worth: KDFW 4 & KDFI 27 (Texas Rangers, 2001–2009) San Francisco–Oakland: KTVU 2 (Giants, 1961–2007; Athletics, 1973–1974), KICU 36 (Athletics, 1999–2008) Boston: WFXT 25 (Red Sox, 2000–2002) Washington, D.C.: WTTG 5 (Senators, 1948–1958), WDCA 20 (Nationals, 2005–2008) Houston: KRIV 26 (Astros, 1979–1982), KTXH 20 (Astros, 1983–1997, 2008–2012) Detroit: WJBK 2 (Tigers, 1953–1974; 2007) Minneapolis–Saint Paul: KMSP 9 (Twins, 1979–1988, 1998–2002), WFTC 29 (Twins, 1990–1992, 2005–2010)

Commentators

All-Star Game ALCS ALDS NLCS NLDS World Series

Key figures

Kenny Albert Dick Bremer Thom Brennaman Joe Buck Joe Davis Aaron Goldsmith Mike Joy Justin Kutcher Josh Lewin Tom McCarthy Mel Proctor John Rooney Dave Sims Dick Stockton Daron Sutton Matt Vasgersian Rich Waltz

Color commentators

Rod Allen Bob Brenly Joe Girardi Mark Grace Mark Gubicza Rex Hudler Eric Karros Steve Lyons Rick Manning Tim McCarver José Mota A. J. Pierzynski Harold Reynolds Frank Robinson Ken Singleton John Smoltz Jeff Torborg Tom Verducci

Guest commentators

Bret Boone David Cone Terry Francona Luis Gonzalez Ozzie Guillén Al Leiter David Ortiz A. J. Pierzynski Lou Piniella Jimmy Rollins Nick Swisher

Field reporters

Erin Andrews Curt Menefee Chris Myers Ken Rosenthal

Studio hosts

Greg Amsinger Kevin Burkhardt Chip Caray Brian Kenny Keith Olbermann Patrick O'Neal Chris Rose Rob Stone Jeanne Zelasko

Studio analysts

Eric Byrnes Keith Hernandez Raúl Ibañez Gabe Kapler Kevin Kennedy Kevin Millar C. J. Nitkowski Dan Plesac Billy Ripken Pete Rose Mark Sweeney Frank Thomas Mitch Williams Dontrelle Willis Dave Winfield

Lore

The Flip Play (2001) Steve Bartman (2003) Yankees–Red Sox rivalry The 53-Minute 7th Inning (2015)

Regular season

1998 Major League Baseball home run record chase Philip Humber's perfect game (2012)

World Series games

The Last Night of the Yankee Dynasty (2001) Game 6 of the 2011 World Series Walk-off Obstruction (2013) The End of The Curse (2016) The Wedding Proposal (2017)

Baseball-related curses

Curse of the Bambino Curse of the Billy Goat Curse of Rocky Colavito

World Series

1996 1998 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021

AL Championship Series

1997 1999 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2009 2011 2013 2015 2017 2019 2021

NL Championship Series

1996 1998 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2008 2010 2012 2014 2016 2018 2020

AL Division Series

1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2015 2017 2019 2021

NL Division Series

1996 1998 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2014 2016 2018 2020

All-Star Game

1997 1999 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021

Music

"At Last" "Con te partirò" "Golden Autumn Day" "The Golden Age" "Here Comes the Sun" "Na Na Hey Hey Kiss Him Goodbye" "On Top" "The Rising" Scott Schreer "The Scientist" "Stuck in a Moment You Can't Get Out Of" "Time of Your Life" "Walk On"

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Major League Baseball on ESPN Radio

Play-by-play

Charley Steiner (1998–2001) Jon Miller (1998–2010) Dan Shulman (2002–present) Gary Thorne (2008–2009) Jon Sciambi (2010–present)

Analysts

Kevin Kennedy (1998) Dave Campbell (1999–2010) Chris Singleton (2011–present)

Studio hosts

Joe D'Ambrosio (1998–2007) Marc Kestecher (2008–present)

AL Championship Series

1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

NL Championship Series

1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

AL Division Series

1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

NL Division Series

1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

AL Wild Card Game

2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

NL Wild Card Game

2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

All-Star Game

1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

World Series

1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

Related programs

ESPN Major League Baseball Major League Baseball Game of the Week Sunday Night Baseball

Commentators

All-Star Game ALCS ALDS NLCS NLDS World Series

Lore

1998 Major League Baseball home run record chase Death of Osama bin Laden Grand Slam Single

Tie-breaker games

1998 NL Wild Card Playoff 1999 NL Wild Card Playoff 2007 NL Wild Card Playoff 2008 AL Central Playoff 2009 AL Central Playoff 2013 AL Wild Card tie-breaker

Divisional Series games

The Flip Play "The Bug Game" Roy Halladay's postseason no-hitter "The Illegal Slide Game" "The 53-Minute 7th Inning"

World Series games

The Last Night of the Yankee Dynasty Game 6 of the 2011 World Series Walk-off Obstruction

Chicago Cubs

Steve Bartman (2003) Curse of the Billy Goat

New York Yankees

Yankees–Red Sox rivalry Curse of the Bambino Final game at Yankee Stadium (2008)

Related articles

Major League Baseball on the radio Home Run Derby

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Subway Series

Teams

American Association

Brooklyn Bridegrooms

American League

New York Yankees

National League

Brooklyn Dodgers New York Giants New York Mets

Stadiums

Dodgers

Ebbets Field

Giants

Polo Grounds

Mets

Shea Stadium

Yankees

Yankee Stadium

Rivalries

Bridegrooms–Giants Giants–Yankees Dodgers–Yankees Mets–Yankees

World Series

Bridegrooms–Giants

1889

Giants–Yankees

1921 1922 1923 1936 1937 1951

Dodgers–Yankees

1941 1947 1949 1952 1953 1955 1956

Mets–Yankees

2000

Histories

Brooklyn Bridegrooms/Dodgers New York Giants New York Mets New York Yankees

Related articles

Interleague play New York City Subway Major League Baseball rivalries

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Sports Emmy Award for Outstanding Live Sports Special

1975–1990

1975 World Series (1975–76) 1976 Summer Olympics (1976–77) Heavyweight championship boxing match between Muhammad Ali and Leon Spinks (1977–78) Super Bowl XIII (1978–79) 1980 Winter Olympics (1979–80) 1981 Kentucky Derby (1980–81) 1982 Men's NCAA Basketball National Championship (1981–82) 1982 World Series (1982–83) Not awarded (1983–84) 1984 Summer Olympics (1984–85) Not awarded (1985–86) 1987 Daytona 500 (1986–87) 1987 Kentucky Derby (1987–88) 1988 Summer Olympics (1988) 1989 Indianapolis 500 (1989) 1990 Indianapolis 500 (1990)

1991–2009

1991 NBA Finals (1991) 1992 Breeders Cup (1992) 1993 World Series (1993) 1994 Stanley Cup Finals (1994) Cal Ripken, Jr.'s 2,131st consecutive game (1995) 1996 World Series (1996) 1997 NBA Finals (1997) Mark McGwire's 62nd home run (1998) 1999 Major League Baseball All-Star Game (1999) 2000 World Series (2000) 2001 World Series (2001) 2002 Winter Olympics (2002) 2003 Major League Baseball postseason (2003) 2004 Masters Tournament (2004) 2005 Open Championship (2005) 2006 Major League Baseball postseason (2006) 2007 Fiesta Bowl (2007) 2008 U.S. Open Golf Championship (2008) Super Bowl XLIII (2009)

2010–present

2010 FIFA World Cup Final (2010) 2011 World Series (2011) Super Bowl XLVI (2012) 2013 World Series (2013) Super Bowl XLIX (2014) Super Bowl 50 (2015) 2016 W

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