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The 1982 World Series
World Series
featured the St. Louis Cardinals
St. Louis Cardinals
and the Milwaukee
Milwaukee
Brewers, with the Cardinals winning in seven games. The Cardinals won the National League East division by three games over the Philadelphia Phillies, then defeated the Atlanta Braves
Atlanta Braves
by 3 games to none in the National League
National League
Championship Series. The Brewers won the American League East division by one game over the Baltimore Orioles, then defeated the California Angels
California Angels
by 3 games to 2 in the American League
American League
Championship Series. The 1982 World Series
World Series
represented the last time (until the Giants won in 2010 and the Cardinals in 2011 respectively, both defeating the Texas Rangers) that the National League won back-to-back World Series; they had, in fact, won four straight, starting in 1979. Though the teams had never met before, their home cities had an existing commercial rivalry in the beer market, as St. Louis
St. Louis
is the home of Anheuser–Busch, which owned the Cardinals at the time, while Milwaukee
Milwaukee
is the home of Miller Brewing
Miller Brewing
and other past major competitors of Anheuser–Busch, hence the team name. This led the media to refer to it as the "Suds Series."[1]

Contents

1 Preview 2 Summary 3 Matchups

3.1 Game 1 3.2 Game 2 3.3 Game 3 3.4 Game 4 3.5 Game 5 3.6 Game 6 3.7 Game 7

4 Composite box 5 Aftermath 6 Broadcasting 7 Notes 8 See also 9 References 10 External links

Preview[edit] The 1982 Milwaukee Brewers
Milwaukee Brewers
hit 216 home runs during the regular season, thus earning them the nickname "Harvey's Wallbangers" (after manager Harvey Kuenn). In sharp contrast, the 1982 St. Louis
St. Louis
Cardinals only hit 67 home runs, fewer than the Brewers' Gorman Thomas
Gorman Thomas
(who hit 39) and Ben Oglivie (who swatted 34) combined. The Cardinals had built their reputation and won their division behind solid pitching, exceptional defense, and aggressive base running, manufacturing runs in a style that would come to be called "Whiteyball," named for team manager Whitey Herzog. This style would be the hallmark of the Cardinals through the 1980s and see them into two more World Series (in 1985 and 1987, both of which they lost in seven games). The Brewers and Cardinals each boasted a dominant closer, with veteran Rollie Fingers
Rollie Fingers
holding the role for Milwaukee
Milwaukee
and Bruce Sutter
Bruce Sutter
for St. Louis. Fingers did not pitch in this series, which would have been his fourth, due to a muscle tear in his arm. The two teams had made a trade in December 1980 that was expected to benefit both clubs. Milwaukee
Milwaukee
traded pitchers Dave LaPoint
Dave LaPoint
and Lary Sorensen and outfielders Sixto Lezcano and David Green to the Cardinals, with pitcher Pete Vuckovich and catcher Ted Simmons comprising two-thirds of St. Louis' return. The Cardinals had already traded for Fingers, who had played for the San Diego Padres, but after acquiring him, they acquired Sutter from the Chicago Cubs. St. Louis thus added Fingers to the trade with the Brewers. The Cardinals built their team on speed, clutch hitting and pitching. The Cardinals made additional trades for Willie McGee, Ozzie Smith, George Hendrick, Joaquín Andújar, and Sutter, all designed to craft a well balanced championship level team.[2] The Brewers combined a productive farm system with additional trades as well to build their heavy hitting ball club. Thomas, Moose Haas, Robin Yount, and Paul Molitor
Paul Molitor
came through the system, while the aforementioned Vukovich, Simmons, Fingers, and Oglivie, plus Cecil Cooper and Don Money, all arrived via the trade route. On June 1, with the team 23–24 and floundering in fifth place, Brewer GM Harry Dalton replaced manager Buck Rodgers with Harvey Kuenn. The Brewers responded by winning at a .626 clip the rest of the way, taking first place for good on July 31 and never looking back.[3] Summary[edit] NL St. Louis Cardinals
St. Louis Cardinals
(4) vs. AL Milwaukee Brewers
Milwaukee Brewers
(3)

Game Date Score Location Time Attendance 

1 October 12 Milwaukee Brewers
Milwaukee Brewers
– 10, St. Louis Cardinals
St. Louis Cardinals
– 0 Busch Stadium 2:30 53,723[4] 

2 October 13 Milwaukee Brewers
Milwaukee Brewers
– 4, St. Louis Cardinals
St. Louis Cardinals
– 5 Busch Stadium 2:54 53,723[5] 

3 October 15 St. Louis Cardinals
St. Louis Cardinals
– 6, Milwaukee Brewers
Milwaukee Brewers
– 2 County Stadium 2:53 56,556[6] 

4 October 16 St. Louis Cardinals
St. Louis Cardinals
– 5, Milwaukee Brewers
Milwaukee Brewers
– 7 County Stadium 3:04 56,560[7] 

5 October 17 St. Louis Cardinals
St. Louis Cardinals
– 4, Milwaukee Brewers
Milwaukee Brewers
– 6 County Stadium 3:02 56,562[8] 

6 October 19 Milwaukee Brewers
Milwaukee Brewers
– 1, St. Louis Cardinals
St. Louis Cardinals
– 13 Busch Stadium 2:21 53,723[9] 

7 October 20 Milwaukee Brewers
Milwaukee Brewers
– 3, St. Louis Cardinals
St. Louis Cardinals
– 6 Busch Stadium 2:50 53,723[10]

Matchups[edit] Game 1[edit]

Tuesday, October 12, 1982 7:30 pm (CT) at Busch Stadium
Busch Stadium
in St. Louis, Missouri

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E

Milwaukee 2 0 0 1 1 2 0 0 4 10 17 0

St. Louis 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1

WP: Mike Caldwell (1–0)   LP: Bob Forsch
Bob Forsch
(0–1) Home runs: MIL: Ted Simmons (1) STL: None

The Brewers' left-hander Mike Caldwell pitched a complete game shutout, allowing only three hits. The Brewers' offense was led by Paul Molitor, who had a World Series-record five hits and two RBIs. Robin Yount
Robin Yount
added four hits and two RBIs. The Brewers went up 2–0 in the first when Cardinals' first baseman Keith Hernandez's error on Ben Oglivie ground ball with two on scored a run, then Gorman Thomas's RBI single scored another. Charlie Moore doubled to lead off the fourth and scored on Molitor's single while Ted Simmons homered next inning. Cardinals starter Bob Forsch
Bob Forsch
allowed consecutive two-out singles to Jim Gantner and Molitor in the sixth before both scored on Yount's double and knocked Forsch out of the game. In the ninth, Oglivie walked with one out off of Dave LaPoint, moved to second on a groundout, and scored on Don Money's single. Jeff Lahti relieved LaPoint and allowed a single to Moore. Gantner's triple then scored two before Gantner himself scored on Molitor's single to cap the scoring at 10–0. This was their last post-season win on the road until October 13, 2011, also against the St. Louis
St. Louis
Cardinals. Game 2[edit]

Wednesday, October 13, 1982 7:20 pm (CT) at Busch Stadium
Busch Stadium
in St. Louis, Missouri

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E

Milwaukee 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 4 10 1

St. Louis 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 1 X 5 8 0

WP: Bruce Sutter
Bruce Sutter
(1–0)   LP: Bob McClure
Bob McClure
(0–1) Home runs: MIL: Ted Simmons (2) STL: None

The Brew Crew drew first blood in the second with an RBI double by Charlie Moore. They followed that in the third when Paul Molitor singled, stole second, went to third on a wild pitch by Cardinals starter John Stuper, and scored on a Robin Yount
Robin Yount
groundout. Ted Simmons stretched the lead to 3–0 with his second solo homer in two games. The Cardinals scratched back in their half of the third when rookie Willie McGee
Willie McGee
singled, stole second, and scored on a Tom Herr
Tom Herr
double. Ken Oberkfell
Ken Oberkfell
singled in Herr to cut the Brewer lead to 3–2. The Brewers made it 4–2 in the fifth when Yount doubled and Cecil Cooper singled him in. Darrell Porter
Darrell Porter
tied it in the sixth by doubling in two runs. Then, in the bottom of the eighth, the Brewers felt the effects of not having Rollie Fingers
Rollie Fingers
in the bullpen. With one out, Pete Ladd, pressed into service as the closer, walked Lonnie Smith
Lonnie Smith
with two on to load the bases and then walked pinch-hitter Steve Braun to force in the go-ahead run. The Cardinals could have made it worse, but McGee lined out to short for out #2, and an apparent base hit by Ozzie Smith struck Braun as he was running to second for the third out. Bruce Sutter
Bruce Sutter
pitched the ninth and got credit for the win. Longtime American League
American League
umpire Bill Haller called his final game behind home plate in this contest. He also was the last umpire to wear a tie on the field, and the last to work home plate in the World Series wearing the "balloon" style outside chest protector. Game 3[edit]

Friday, October 15, 1982 7:30 pm (CT) at County Stadium in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E

St. Louis 0 0 0 0 3 0 2 0 1 6 6 1

Milwaukee 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 5 3

WP: Joaquín Andújar (1–0)   LP: Pete Vuckovich (0–1)   Sv: Bruce Sutter
Bruce Sutter
(1) Home runs: STL: Willie McGee
Willie McGee
2 (2) MIL: Cecil Cooper
Cecil Cooper
(1)

Game Three home run and defensive hero, Willie McGee.

Joaquín Andújar and Pete Vuckovich, each team's pitching aces, were locked in a scoreless pitching duel until the top half of the fifth, when Willie McGee
Willie McGee
belted a three-run homer for the Cards. The Redbirds added two more in the seventh off Vuckovich. Lonnie Smith doubled to right-center and tried to stretch it to a triple. Smith scored when Jim Gantner's relay throw to third went wild. McGee followed with a solo home run later in the inning, his second. McGee also had a couple of defensive gems, running down a deep Paul Molitor drive in the first and robbing Gorman Thomas
Gorman Thomas
of a home run in the ninth. In the seventh with one out, Andújar had to leave the game when a line drive from Ted Simmons struck his kneecap. The Brewers loaded the bases in that inning, but ace reliever Bruce Sutter
Bruce Sutter
got the final out to squelch the threat. Cecil Cooper
Cecil Cooper
accounted for the Brewers' only runs with a two-run homer in the eighth off Sutter, while Ozzie Smith
Ozzie Smith
drove in the Cardinals final run with a bases-loaded walk. Sutter qualified for the save in this game (even though the Cards had a 5–0 lead when he entered the game), since he entered with the bases loaded, meaning the potential tying run was on deck. Game 4[edit]

Saturday, October 16, 1982 12:20 pm (CT) at County Stadium in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E

St. Louis 1 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 5 8 1

Milwaukee 0 0 0 0 1 0 6 0 X 7 10 2

WP: Jim Slaton (1–0)   LP: Doug Bair
Doug Bair
(0–1)   Sv: Bob McClure (1)

Game 4 of the 1982 World Series
World Series
pitted Dave LaPoint
Dave LaPoint
(9–3) against Moose Haas (11–8). Haas was a veteran of six major league campaigns while LaPoint had just completed his first full season. For six innings, the Cardinals seemed on the verge of taking a commanding 3–1 Series lead. Dave LaPoint
Dave LaPoint
held the Brewers to three hits in that time span, while his hitters plated him a 5–1 lead. In the top of the first inning, Ken Oberkfell
Ken Oberkfell
doubled down the right-field line and George Hendrick
George Hendrick
hit a high chopper over the middle which handcuffed Yount and bounced into center-field, allowing Oberkfell to score. In the bottom of the first, Oberkfell dropped a bare-handed grounder from Yount. Both teams had trouble at times fielding, and the Brewers errors in Game 3 may have cost them three runs.[11] Two Cardinal runs came in the second on an unusual two-run sacrifice fly by Tom Herr, with Willie McGee
Willie McGee
and Ozzie Smith
Ozzie Smith
scoring. With Willie McGee
Willie McGee
on first and attempting to steal, Brewers catcher Ted Simmons took a pitch-out but bobbled the ball allowing McGee to steal second. After a walk to Ozzie Smith, Moose Haas’ wild pitch moved McGee to third and Smith to second. On Herr's deep sacrifice fly, Smith took advantage of center fielder Gorman Thomas
Gorman Thomas
slipping and falling on the warning track. Ken Oberkfell
Ken Oberkfell
followed with a walk, stole second and came home when a Keith Hernandez
Keith Hernandez
grounder went through Gantner's legs. The Cardinals scored three times despite only one base hit. In the Brewers half of the fifth, with none out and runners at first and third, Ozzie Smith
Ozzie Smith
made one of his famous Wizard of Oz[11] plays. Gantner hit a ground ball through the middle towards center field. Smith, though off-balance, stabbed at the ball while simultaneously stepping on second base, recovered and fired to first to double up Gantner. In the seventh, things fell apart. With one out, Oglivie reached first when first baseman Keith Hernandez's toss to LaPoint was dropped. LaPoint was relieved by Doug Bair
Doug Bair
after giving up a two-out RBI (unearned) double to Gantner. Before relieved by Jim Kaat, Bair walked Molitor and gave up a bases-loaded, two-run (both unearned) single to Yount. An RBI single by Cecil Cooper
Cecil Cooper
and a wild pitch brought in the fourth Cardinals pitcher, Jeff Lahti. Lahti intentionally walked (charged to Kaat) Simmons and gave up another bases-loaded, two-run single to Thomas. Lahti issued another intentional walk to Oglivie then induced a fly out to left field to end this inning. In this inning, six runs (three earned) crossed the plate for the Brewers on five hits and one error. Game 5[edit]

Sunday, October 17, 1982 3:45 pm (CT) at County Stadium in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E

St. Louis 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 4 15 2

Milwaukee 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 2 X 6 11 1

WP: Mike Caldwell (2–0)   LP: Bob Forsch
Bob Forsch
(0–2)   Sv: Bob McClure (2) Home runs: STL: None MIL: Robin Yount
Robin Yount
(1)

Mike Caldwell pitched his second win of the Series and almost went the distance. The Brewers struck first on Ted Simmons's bases loaded groundout in the first off of Bob Forsch, but the Cardinals tied the game in the third on Keith Hernandez's RBI double. The Brewers took a 2–1 lead in the bottom half on Cecil Cooper's groundout with runners on first and third and added to their lead on Paul Molitor's RBI single in the fifth. George Hendrick's RBI single in the seventh cut the Brewers lead to 3–2, but they got that run back in the bottom of the inning on Robin Yount's home run, then added to their lead in the eighth on back-to-back RBI singles by Charlie Moore and Jim Gantner off of Bruce Sutter. The Cardinals staged a late rally in the ninth as Keith Hernandez
Keith Hernandez
doubled in a run and George Hendrick
George Hendrick
singled him in with two outs. Bob McClure
Bob McClure
came in and allowed a single to Darrell Porter, putting the tying run on base. McClure, however, struck out Willie McGee, then retired pinch-hitter Gene Tenace to end the game. Robin Yount
Robin Yount
set a World Series
World Series
record by recording his second four-hit game, his first came in Game 1. To this day, Yount remains the only player to have multiple 4-hit games in one World Series. This was the tenth and final World Series
World Series
game at Milwaukee
Milwaukee
County Stadium (1957, 1958 and 1982) as well as the final playoff game at Milwaukee
Milwaukee
County Stadium. Game 6[edit]

Tuesday, October 19, 1982 7:20 pm (CT) at Busch Stadium
Busch Stadium
in St. Louis, Missouri

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E

Milwaukee 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 4 4

St. Louis 0 2 0 3 2 6 0 0 X 13 12 1

WP: John Stuper (1–0)   LP: Don Sutton
Don Sutton
(0–1) Home runs: MIL: None STL: Darrell Porter
Darrell Porter
(1), Keith Hernandez
Keith Hernandez
(1)

Game 6 was hampered by two rain delays that totaled over ​2 1⁄2 hours. The Cardinals staved off elimination with a blowout win. In the second, Dane Iorg
Dane Iorg
doubled with two outs off of Don Sutton and scored on an error on Willie McGee's ground ball. Tom Herr's double then made it 2–0 Cardinals. In the fourth, Darrell Porter hit a two-run home run, then Iorg tripled and scored on Herr's groundout. Keith Hernandez's two-run home run in the fifth made it 7–0 Cardinals and knock Sutton out of the game. In the sixth, Iorg hit a leadoff double, moved to third on a wild pitch by Doc Medich, and scored on McGee's single. A single and walk loaded the bases with two outs before Hernandez's single scored two, Hendrick's single scored another, and an error on Porter's ground ball scored two more. The Brewers avoided a shutout in the ninth when Jim Gantner, who doubled to leadoff the inning, scored on Glenn Brummer's wild pitch Dane Iorg
Dane Iorg
had two doubles and a triple as rookie John Stuper went the distance (helped by the rain delays), scattering four hits. Game 7[edit]

Wednesday, October 20, 1982 7:20 pm (CT) at Busch Stadium
Busch Stadium
in St. Louis, Missouri

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E

Milwaukee 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 3 7 0

St. Louis 0 0 0 1 0 3 0 2 X 6 15 1

WP: Joaquín Andújar (2–0)   LP: Bob McClure
Bob McClure
(0–2)   Sv: Bruce Sutter
Bruce Sutter
(2) Home runs: MIL: Ben Oglivie (1) STL: None

Joaquín Andújar and Pete Vuckovich opposed each other once again. The game was scoreless until the bottom of the fourth when the Cardinals scored first on a Lonnie Smith
Lonnie Smith
RBI single. Ben Oglivie tied it for the Brew Crew in the fifth with a solo homer, and they took a 3–1 lead in the sixth when Jim Gantner scored on an error and Cecil Cooper hit a sacrifice fly. But, in the bottom of the sixth, Vuckovich began to run into trouble. With one out, Ozzie Smith
Ozzie Smith
singled and Lonnie Smith
Lonnie Smith
doubled him to third. Brewers manager Harvey Kuenn
Harvey Kuenn
then pulled Vuckovich in favor of Bob McClure, who intentionally walked pinch-hitter Gene Tenace to load the bases. Keith Hernandez
Keith Hernandez
then tied the game with a two-run single. George Hendrick
George Hendrick
then gave the Cardinals the lead with an RBI single. The Cardinals punctuated the scoring with two runs in the eighth on RBI singles by Series MVP Darrell Porter
Darrell Porter
and Steve Braun. Andújar pitched seven strong innings and Bruce Sutter
Bruce Sutter
pitched the eighth and ninth for his second save. Composite box[edit] 1982 World Series
World Series
(4–3): St. Louis Cardinals
St. Louis Cardinals
(N.L.) over Milwaukee Brewers (A.L.)

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E

St. Louis
St. Louis
Cardinals 1 5 3 4 5 12 3 3 3 39 67 7

Milwaukee
Milwaukee
Brewers 3 1 3 1 5 4 7 4 5 33 64 11

Total attendance: 384,570   Average attendance: 54,939 Winning player's share: $43,280   Losing player's share: $31,935[12]

Aftermath[edit] Paul Molitor
Paul Molitor
set a World Series
World Series
record with his fifth hit, in the ninth inning of Game 1. Robin Yount
Robin Yount
would set another record in the seventh inning of Game 5 by becoming the first player in Series history to have two four-hit games. Cardinals catcher Darrell Porter
Darrell Porter
was given the Series MVP award. Brewers pitcher Mike Caldwell, who won two games, would have been a strong candidate, as well as Molitor. Paul Molitor
Paul Molitor
would eventually win the Series MVP Award 11 years later as a member of the Toronto Blue Jays. As it was, the winning team won the MVP. The only player on the losing team to win the MVP was Bobby Richardson
Bobby Richardson
of the 1960 New York Yankees. Both participants are currently in the NL Central, due to the transfer of the Brewers from the American League
American League
to the National League
National League
in 1998. This raises the possibility of the Brewers eventually representing two different leagues in World Series
World Series
competition. That has happened three times before, taking the 19th Century contests into account: The Brooklyn Dodgers
Brooklyn Dodgers
of 1889 and 1890, the Cardinals, who won the 1886 Series when they were in the American Association, and the Houston Astros, who played in both the 2005 World Series
World Series
against the Chicago White Sox
Chicago White Sox
as a National League
National League
team, and the 2017 World Series against the Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
as an American League
American League
team. This also makes this one of two World Series
World Series
in the modern era (1903–present) that it is not possible to have a rematch, the other being the Astros and White Sox, due to the Astros moving to the American League
American League
in 2013. The Brewers and Cardinals would later meet in the 2011 National League Championship Series, with the Cardinals winning that series four games to two. As in 1982, the Cardinals won the 2011 World Series
World Series
in seven games, this time against the Texas Rangers. As of 2015, the Cardinals' 11 championships are the most won by any National League
National League
team, and second only to the New York Yankees, who have 27. As of the 1982 World Series victory, the Cardinals had 9 championships compared to the Yankees' 22. Broadcasting[edit] This was the final World Series
World Series
telecast for longtime NBC analyst Tony Kubek, and the only one for veteran announcer Dick Enberg. Enberg hosted the pregame shows and alternated play-by-play duties (Enberg called the middle innings) with Joe Garagiola, who was himself working his last Series in that role before moving to the color commentator position alongside Vin Scully
Vin Scully
(who called the 1982 World Series alongside Sparky Anderson
Sparky Anderson
for CBS Radio) the following season. Conversely, this was NBC's first Series telecast to feature Bob Costas (who served as a field reporter and hosted the World Series
World Series
Trophy presentation following Game 7). Costas and Kubek would subsequently team up as the network's secondary MLB announcing team from 1983 to 1989. This included the June 23, 1984 game between St. Louis
St. Louis
and Chicago otherwise known as the Ryne Sandberg game.[13] Tom Seaver
Tom Seaver
also provided periodic color commentary for NBC throughout the series, broadcasting from field level rather than in the booth. Notes[edit]

^ Knoedelseder, William (2012). Bitter Brew: The Rise and Fall of Anheuser–Busch
Anheuser–Busch
and America's Kings of Beer. HarperCollins. p. 193. ISBN 9780062009272.  ^ "The 1982 St. Louis
St. Louis
Cardinals". Baseball-Reference.com. Archived from the original on May 23, 2011. Retrieved June 21, 2011.  ^ "The 1982 Milwaukee
Milwaukee
Brewers". Baseball-Reference.com. Archived from the original on June 29, 2011. Retrieved June 21, 2011.  ^ "1982 World Series
World Series
Game 1 – Milwaukee Brewers
Milwaukee Brewers
vs. St. Louis Cardinals". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.  ^ "1982 World Series
World Series
Game 2 – Milwaukee Brewers
Milwaukee Brewers
vs. St. Louis Cardinals". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.  ^ "1982 World Series
World Series
Game 3 – St. Louis Cardinals
St. Louis Cardinals
vs. Milwaukee Brewers". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.  ^ "1982 World Series
World Series
Game 4 – St. Louis
St. Louis
Cahdinals vs. Milwaukee Brewers". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.  ^ "1982 World Series
World Series
Game 5 – St. Louis Cardinals
St. Louis Cardinals
vs. Milwaukee Brewers". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.  ^ "1982 World Series
World Series
Game 6 – Milwaukee Brewers
Milwaukee Brewers
vs. St. Louis Cardinals". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.  ^ "1982 World Series
World Series
Game 7 – Milwaukee Brewers
Milwaukee Brewers
vs. St. Louis Cardinals". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.  ^ a b Smith, Ozzie; Rains, Rob (2002). Ozzie Smith
Ozzie Smith
— The Road to Cooperstown. Sports Publishing L.L.C. ISBN 1-58261-576-4. OCLC 50326570.  ^ " World Series
World Series
Gate Receipts and Player Shares". Baseball Almanac. Archived from the original on May 2, 2009. Retrieved June 14, 2009.  ^ http://www.chicagotribune.com/sports/breaking/chi-costas-remembers-sandberg-game-on-its-30year-anniversary-20140623-story.html

See also[edit]

1982 Japan Series

References[edit]

Neft, David S.; Cohen, Richard M. (1990). The World Series
World Series
(1st ed.). New York: St Martins. pp. 393–397. 

External links[edit]

1982 World Series
World Series
at WorldSeries.com (MLB.com) 1982 World Series
World Series
at Baseball Almanac 1982 World Series
World Series
at Baseball-Reference.com The 1982 Post-Season Games (box scores and play-by-play) at Retrosheet History of the World Series
World Series
- 1982 at The SportingNews. Archived from the original on 2008. For All You Do, This Hug's For You at SI.com 1982 St. Louis Cardinals
St. Louis Cardinals
at baseballlibrary.com 1982 Milwaukee Brewers
Milwaukee Brewers
at baseballlibrary.com

v t e

1982 Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
postseason

World Series

American League
American League
Championship Series National League
National League
Championship Series

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teams

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Milwaukee
Brewers

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teams

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Cardinals

v t e

World Series

No World Series
World Series
was held in 1904 because the NL champions refused to participate; no World Series
World Series
was held in 1994 due to a players' strike.

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See also

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v t e

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v t e

Milwaukee
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Brewers

Formerly the Seattle Pilots Based in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Franchise

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Expansion

Draft

Seasons Records No-hitters Hall of Fame Walk of Fame Awards and All-Stars Players Management Opening Day starting pitchers First-round picks Broadcasters All articles

Ballparks

Sick's Stadium Milwaukee
Milwaukee
County Stadium Miller Park

Spring training: Tempe Diablo Stadium Sun City Stadium Compadre Stadium Maryvale Baseball Park

Culture and lore

Ball Four
Ball Four
(Jim Bouton book) Beer Barrel Man Bernie Brewer Bob Uecker "Brewer Fever" Hank T. Dog Mr. 3000 Roll Out The Barrel Sausage Race Secret Stadium Sauce

Key personnel

Owner: Mark Attanasio General Manager: David Stearns Manager: Craig Counsell

Minor league affiliates

Player overview AAA: Colorado Springs Sky Sox AA: Biloxi Shuckers A Adv.: Carolina Mudcats A: Wisconsin
Wisconsin
Timber Rattlers Rookie Adv.: Helena Brewers Rookie: AZL Brewers DSL Brewers

Rivalries

Chicago Cubs

League pennants

American League:

1982

National League:

none

Division titles

AL East:

1981 (second half) 1982

NL Central:

2011

Wild Card berths

National League: 2008

Seasons (50)

1960s

1960 · 1961 · 1962 · 1963 · 1964 · 1965 · 1966 · 1967 · 1968 · 1969

1970s

1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979

1980s

1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989

1990s

1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999

2000s

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

2010s

2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

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St. Louis Cardinals
St. Louis Cardinals
1982 World Series
World Series
champions

1 Ozzie Smith 5 Mike Ramsey 10 Ken Oberkfell 11 Glenn Brummer 14 Julio González 15 Darrell Porter
Darrell Porter
(NLCS and World Series
World Series
MVP) 18 Gene Tenace 19 Dane Iorg 22 David Green 25 George Hendrick 26 Steve Braun 27 Lonnie Smith 28 Tom Herr 31 Bob Forsch 32 Jeff Lahti 33 John Martin 36 Jim Kaat 37 Keith Hernandez 38 Steve Mura 39 Dave LaPoint 40 Doug Bair 42 Bruce Sutter 47 Joaquín Andújar 48 John Stuper 51 Willie McGee

Manager 24 Whitey Herzog

Coaches 2 Red Schoendienst 3 Dave Ricketts 4 Chuck Hiller 8 Hal Lanier 9 Hub Kittle

Regular season National League
National League
Championship Series

v t e

Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
on NBC

Related programs

Baseball Night in America (1994–1995) Major League Baseball: An Inside Look (1979–1989) Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
Game of the Week (1957–1964; 1966–1989) Major League Baseball on NBC
Major League Baseball on NBC
Radio (1927–1938; 1957–1975) Monday Night Baseball (1967–1975)

Misc. programs

Gillette
Gillette
Cavalcade of Sports USA Thursday Game of the Week (1979–1983)

Related articles

The Baseball Network World Series
World Series
television ratings Television contracts

NBC's owned & operated TV stations

W2XBS (later WNBT) (New York Yankees, 1939–1945) WCAU
WCAU
10 (Philadelphia Phillies, 2014–present) KCST 39 (later KNSD) (San Diego Padres, 1971–1972; 1984–1986) KNTV
KNTV
11 (San Francisco Giants, 2008–present)

NBC Sports

Bay Area (San Francisco Giants) California (Oakland Athletics) Chicago ( Chicago Cubs
Chicago Cubs
& White Sox) Philadelphia (Philadelphia Phillies) New York (New York Mets)

Sponsors

Ford Gillette National Bohemian

Commentators

The Baseball Network All-Star Game ALCS ALDS NLCS NLDS World Series

Key figures

Mel Allen Jim Britt Jack Buck Skip Caray Bob Carpenter Bob Costas Dick Enberg Bill Enis Joe Garagiola Curt Gowdy Greg Gumbel Merle Harmon Ernie Harwell Charlie Jones George Kell Jon Miller Monte Moore Bob Neal Lindsey Nelson Bill O'Donnell Jay Randolph Ted Robinson Vin Scully Jim Simpson Chuck Thompson Gary Thorne Pete van Wieren Bob Wolff Jim Woods

Color commentators

Sal Bando Bucky Dent Larry Dierker Don Drysdale Leo Durocher Joe Garagiola Ken Harrelson Fred Haney Tommy Hutton Jim Kaat Sandy Koufax Tony Kubek Ron Luciano John Lowenstein Mickey Mantle Tim McCarver Joe Morgan Bobby Murcer Wes Parker Pee Wee Reese Al Rosen Tom Seaver Mike Shannon Joe Torre Bob Uecker Bill Veeck Maury Wills

Guest commentators

Rick Dempsey Barry Larkin Ronald Reagan Mike Schmidt Don Sutton Bobby Valentine

Hosts

Mike Adamle Marv Albert Len Berman Jimmy Cefalo Gayle Gardner Bryant Gumbel Bill Macatee Keith Olbermann Ahmad Rashād Hannah Storm

Field reporters

Johnny Bench Jim Gray Jimmy Roberts Craig Sager Bob Wischusen

Lore

Regular season games

#715 (1974) "The Sandberg Game" (1984)

Tie-breaker games

1951 National League
National League
tie-breaker series (Games 2-3) 1962 National League
National League
tie-breaker series

LCS games

"Go crazy folks!" (1985) Jeffrey Maier (1996) "Grand Slam Single" (1999)

World Series games

Subway Series "The Catch (1954)" Don Larsen's Perfect Game (1956) "Shoe polish incident" (1969) "Fisk Waves it Fair" (1975) Michael Sergio (1986) "It gets through Buckner!" (1986) Kirk Gibson's home run (1988) All-Century Team (1999)

Music

"Broken Wings" "Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood" "Don't Look in My Eyes" "Fame" "Limelight" "One Moment in Time" "The Stuff That Dreams Are Made Of"

Instrumentals

The Adventures of Brisco County, Jr. "Chase" "Don't Turn Away" "Take Me Out to the Ball Game" The Untouchables

World Series

1947 (Games 1 & 5) 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1978 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1995 (Games 2–3, & 6) 1997 1999

AL Championship

1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1995 (Games 3–6) 1996 1998 2000

NL Championship

1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1995 (Games 3–4) 1997 1999

AL Division Series

1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000

NL Division Series

1981 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999

All-Star Game

1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959: First–Second 1960: First–Second 1961: First–Second 1962: First–Second 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1994 1996 1998 2000

Seasons

Pre-Game of the Week

1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956

Game of the Week era

1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 (All-Star Game and World Series
World Series
only) 1966 (exclusive coverage begins) 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989

The Baseball Network
The Baseball Network
era

1994 1995

No regular season coverage

1996 1997 1998 1999 2000

v t e

Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
on CBS Radio

Related programs

Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
on CBS (1955–1965; 1990–1993) Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
Game of the Week (1985–1997) Sunday Night Baseball
Sunday Night Baseball
(1990–1997)

Related articles

Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
on the radio 1950 Brooklyn Dodgers
Brooklyn Dodgers
season (simulcasts)

Commentators

All-Star Game ALCS ALDS NLCS NLDS World Series

Key figures

Marty Brennaman Steve Busby Jack Buck Gary Cohen Jerry Coleman Win Elliot Gene Elston Curt Gowdy Hank Greenwald Ernie Harwell Jim Hunter Harry Kalas Ralph Kiner Denny Matthews Frank Messer Bob Murphy Brent Musburger Ned Martin Lindsey Nelson Ross Porter Ted Robinson John Rooney Herb Score Vin Scully Dick Stockton Bill White

Color commentators

Sparky Anderson Johnny Bench Rick Cerone Al Downing Steve Garvey Brooks Robinson Duke Snider Jeff Torborg Joe Torre

Pre-1976 commentators

Mel Allen Red Barber Boake Carter Bob Elson Jack Graney Fred Hoey Ted Husing France Laux

Lore

1978 American League East tie-breaker game The Double (Seattle Mariners)

World Series
World Series
games

Babe Ruth's called shot
Babe Ruth's called shot
(1932) Ladies and Gentlemen, the Bronx Is Burning (1977) Michael Sergio (1986) Kirk Gibson's 1988 World Series
World Series
home run 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake

LCS games

Francisco Cabrera game (1992) Jeffrey Maier (1996)

AL Championship Series

1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1995 1996 1997

NL Championship Series

1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1995 1996 1997

AL Division Series

1981 1995 1996 1997

NL Division Series

1981 1995 1996 1997

All-Star Game

1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997

World Series

1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 (cancelled) 1995 1996 1997

v t e

Sports Emmy Award for Outstanding Live Sports Special

1975–1990

1975 World Series
World Series
(1975–76) 1976 Summer Olympics
1976 Summer Olympics
(1976–77) Heavyweight championship boxing match between Muhammad Ali
Muhammad Ali
and Leon Spinks (1977–78) Super Bowl XIII
Super Bowl XIII
(1978–79) 1980 Winter Olympics
1980 Winter Olympics
(1979–80) 1981 Kentucky Derby
Kentucky Derby
(1980–81) 1982 Men's NCAA Basketball National Championship (1981–82) 1982 World Series
World Series
(1982–83) Not awarded (1983–84) 1984 Summer Olympics
1984 Summer Olympics
(1984–85) Not awarded (1985–86) 1987 Daytona 500
1987 Daytona 500
(1986–87) 1987 Kentucky Derby
Kentucky Derby
(1987–88) 1988 Summer Olympics
1988 Summer Olympics
(1988) 1989 Indianapolis 500
1989 Indianapolis 500
(1989) 1990 Indianapolis 500
1990 Indianapolis 500
(1990)

1991–2009

1991 NBA Finals
1991 NBA Finals
(1991) 1992 Breeders Cup
Breeders Cup
(1992) 1993 World Series
World Series
(1993) 1994 Stanley Cup Finals (1994) Cal Ripken, Jr.'s 2,131st consecutive game (1995) 1996 World Series
World Series
(1996) 1997 NBA Finals
1997 NBA Finals
(1997) Mark McGwire's 62nd home run (1998) 1999 Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
All-Star Game (1999) 2000 World Series
World Series
(2000) 2001 World Series
World Series
(2001) 2002 Winter Olympics
2002 Winter Olympics
(2002) 2003 Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
postseason (2003) 2004 Masters Tournament (2004) 2005 Open Championship
2005 Open Championship
(2005) 2006 Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
postseason (2006) 2007 Fiesta Bowl
2007 Fiesta Bowl
(2007) 2008 U.S. Open Golf Championship (2008) Super Bowl XLIII
Super Bowl XLIII
(2009)

2010–present

2010 FIFA World Cup Final
2010 FIFA World Cup Final
(2010) 2011 World Series
World Series
(2011) Super Bowl XLVI
Super Bowl XLVI
(2012) 2013 World Series
World Series
(2013) Super Bowl XLIX
Super Bowl XLIX
(2014) Super Bowl 50
Super Bowl 50
(2015) 2016 World S

.