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The 1965 World Series
World Series
featured the National League
National League
champion Los Angeles Dodgers against the American League
American League
champion Minnesota
Minnesota
Twins. It is best remembered[according to whom?] for the heroics of Sandy Koufax, who was named the series MVP. Koufax did not pitch in Game 1, as it fell on the Jewish holy day of Yom Kippur, but pitched in Game 2 and then tossed shutouts in Games 5 and 7 (with only two days of rest in between) to win the championship. The Twins had won their first pennant since 1933 when the team was known as the Washington Senators. The Dodgers, prevailing in seven games, captured their second title in three years, and their third since moving to Los Angeles
Los Angeles
in 1958.

Contents

1 Background 2 Summary 3 Matchups

3.1 Game 1 3.2 Game 2 3.3 Game 3 3.4 Game 4 3.5 Game 5 3.6 Game 6 3.7 Game 7

4 Composite box 5 Aftermath 6 Notes 7 See also 8 References 9 External links

Background[edit] Both teams improved from sixth-place finishes in 1964; the Twins won the A.L. pennant with relative ease while the Dodgers were locked in a season-long five-way battle in the N.L. among themselves, the Giants, Pirates, Reds, and Braves. After the Giants won their 14th-consecutive game to take a ​4 1⁄2-game lead on September 16, the Dodgers went on a 13-game winning streak over the final two weeks of the season to clinch the pennant on the next to last day of the season over the second place rival Giants. During the 1965 Season, the Dodgers relied heavily on the arms of Sandy Koufax
Sandy Koufax
and Don Drysdale, and would rely on them even more in the World Series, as the Dodgers only used seven pitchers. The Dodgers' strong core of pitchers, which also included Claude Osteen and Ron Perranoski, kept them in the pennant race and into the Series. Koufax, surviving on a steady diet of Cortisone and pain killers for his arthritic left elbow,[1] pitched five times in 15 days down the stretch, winning four (three shutouts), including 13 strikeouts in the pennant winner against Milwaukee.[2] Dodger hitting however remained strictly popgun, especially after Tommy Davis went down in late April for the season with a broken ankle.[3] Manager Walter Alston
Walter Alston
promptly called up 12-year minor league veteran Lou Johnson from Spokane. Johnson led the Dodgers, along with ROY Jim Lefebvre, in home runs with just 12. The Twins, managed by Sam Mele, had a more balanced attack, equally strong in pitching and hitting, although their defense committed 173 errors including 39 by shortstop Zoilo Versalles. Offensively Mele again had balance with good hitting, power and speed up and down his lineup that included AL's leading hitter Tony Oliva
Tony Oliva
(.321), and 20-plus home runs from five different players. Pitching was spearheaded by 20-game winner Mudcat Grant, Jim "Kitty" Kaat, and Camilo Pascual. This was only the second World Series
World Series
where both teams were located west of the Mississippi River. The first occurred in 1944, when the St. Louis Browns faced their Sportsman's Park
Sportsman's Park
tenants, the St. Louis Cardinals. This was the first of eleven consecutive World Series
World Series
that did not have the New York Yankees
New York Yankees
playing in it; it was the longest such streak until 1993, when the Toronto Blue Jays
Toronto Blue Jays
claimed the second of their back-to-back World Series
World Series
championships by defeating the Philadelphia Phillies. It was also the first series in which both teams had had losing records the previous year. This has since been repeated two other times, both times also involving the Twins—in 1987 and 1991. This World Series
World Series
was the first in which all games were played in cities that did not have National League
National League
or American League
American League
teams in 1903, the year of the first modern World Series. Also, it is the earliest World Series
World Series
whose telecasts are known to survive in their entirety; the CBC has complete kinescopes of all seven games in its archives. Summary[edit] The Twins won the first two games of the series against Don Drysdale and Sandy Koufax, but once Claude Osteen shut out the Twins in Game 3, things turned around. Willie Davis of The Dodgers tied a World Series record stealing 3 bases in one Game, game 5, the record was set by Honus Wagner in 1909. The Dodgers proceeded to win the three middle games at Dodger Stadium
Dodger Stadium
and Koufax would pitch two shutouts including a three-hitter with ten strikeouts to clinch. Ron Fairly
Ron Fairly
hit two home runs for the Dodgers, both in losing efforts. NL Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
(4) vs. AL Minnesota Twins
Minnesota Twins
(3)

Game Date Score Location Time Attendance 

1 October 6 Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
– 2, Minnesota Twins
Minnesota Twins
– 8 Metropolitan Stadium 2:29 47,797[4] 

2 October 7 Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
– 1, Minnesota Twins
Minnesota Twins
– 5 Metropolitan Stadium 2:13 48,700[5] 

3 October 9 Minnesota Twins
Minnesota Twins
– 0, Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
– 4 Dodger Stadium 2:06 55,934[6] 

4 October 10 Minnesota Twins
Minnesota Twins
– 2, Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
– 7 Dodger Stadium 2:15 55,920[7] 

5 October 11 Minnesota Twins
Minnesota Twins
– 0, Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
– 7 Dodger Stadium 2:34 55,801[8] 

6 October 13 Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
– 1, Minnesota Twins
Minnesota Twins
– 5 Metropolitan Stadium 2:16 49,578[9] 

7 October 14 Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
– 2, Minnesota Twins
Minnesota Twins
– 0 Metropolitan Stadium 2:27 50,596[10]

Matchups[edit] Game 1[edit]

Wednesday, October 6, 1965 2:00 pm (CT) at Metropolitan Stadium in Bloomington, Minnesota

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E

Los Angeles 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 10 1

Minnesota 0 1 6 0 0 1 0 0 X 8 10 0

WP: Mudcat Grant
Mudcat Grant
(1–0)   LP: Don Drysdale
Don Drysdale
(0–1) Home runs: LAD: Ron Fairly
Ron Fairly
(1) MIN: Don Mincher (1), Zoilo Versalles
Zoilo Versalles
(1)

Hall of Famer Sandy Koufax

Game 1 was set to be a pitching duel between Dodgers' Don Drysdale
Don Drysdale
and the Twins' Mudcat Grant
Mudcat Grant
(21–7, 3.30 ERA on the year). Drysdale was starting because the game fell on Yom Kippur, the holiest day of the year for people of the Jewish faith. Dodger ace Sandy Koufax, who was Jewish, stated he would not pitch that day. In the Twins' third inning any thought of a pitchers' duel was put to rest. Going into that inning, it was 1–1. Coming out, it was 7–1. It started with a Frank Quilici
Frank Quilici
double to left field, followed by an error by Jim Lefebvre, allowing the pitcher Grant to reach. Then, shortstop Zoilo Versalles
Zoilo Versalles
stepped to the plate. He had hit nineteen home runs in the regular season and would later win the AL MVP Award for that year. He crushed a pitch from Drysdale for a three-run home run to make the score, 4–1. However, the Twins' scoring wasn't over. With still no one out, left fielder Sandy Valdespino began things again with a double. After a few outs and baserunners, and a single by Harmon Killebrew, the Twins had two runners again. With three straight singles (Earl Battey, Don Mincher, and Quilici), scoring three unearned runs, the Twins had jumped out to a six-run lead and would never look back, winning the game 8–2. Frank Quilici
Frank Quilici
set a World Series
World Series
record with his two hits in the third inning. Mudcat Grant
Mudcat Grant
was the first black World Series
World Series
game-winner for an American League
American League
team, and just the seventh pitcher to homer in a World Series
World Series
game. The Dodgers had scored their runs on a Ron Fairly
Ron Fairly
homer and a Maury Wills bunt single that scored Lefebvre. Grant received the win while Drysdale took the loss. In the postgame news conference, a reporter jokingly said to Dodger manager Walter Alston, "I bet you wish Drysdale was Jewish too." Game 2[edit]

Thursday, October 7, 1965 2:00 pm (CT) at Metropolitan Stadium
Metropolitan Stadium
in Bloomington, Minnesota

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E

Los Angeles 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 7 3

Minnesota 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 2 X 5 9 0

WP: Jim Kaat
Jim Kaat
(1–0)   LP: Sandy Koufax
Sandy Koufax
(0–1)

In Game 2, the Twins this time got to Dodger ace Sandy Koufax. Minnesota's pitcher, this time Jim Kaat, again shut down the Dodgers' weak offense. A heavy rain storm soaked Metropolitan Stadium overnight, and the two teams slogged their way through the first five innings. In the top of the fifth, Ron Fairly
Ron Fairly
singled, then left-fielder Bob Allison
Bob Allison
made a diving, sliding catch of a fly ball off the bat of Jim Lefebvre, preventing a run. Aided by an error, the Twins broke the scoreless tie in the sixth, Versalles hit a missile shot and when Jim Gilliam
Jim Gilliam
bobbled the ball at third base, the ball ricocheted off Gilliam and into left field. Versalles reached on the two-base error, then scored on a Tony Oliva
Tony Oliva
double. Killebrew followed with a single, plating Oliva. That is all the runs the Twins would need, though Kaat added insurance in the eighth with a two-run base hit of his own. The Twins went up 2–0 in the Series. Game 3[edit]

Saturday, October 9, 1965 1:00 pm (PT) at Dodger Stadium
Dodger Stadium
in Los Angeles, California

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E

Minnesota 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0

Los Angeles 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 X 4 10 1

WP: Claude Osteen (1–0)   LP: Camilo Pascual (0–1)

In Game 3, pressure was on Claude Osteen to have a good start so Los Angeles would not go down 0–3. He faced Camilo Pascual, who had a quality (though somewhat injury plagued) year (9–3, 3.35 ERA). Dodger Stadium
Dodger Stadium
was filled to capacity and fans were treated to an appearance from Casey Stengel, a member of the 1916 Dodgers World Series team. Stengel, sans his cane despite a broken hip, hobbled on to the field and threw out the first pitch. In the first inning, Versalles led off with a double. But with two men on, Versalles was caught stealing home on the front end of an attempted double steal. In the fourth, Johnny Roseboro
Johnny Roseboro
put the Dodgers on the board with a two-run single. The play cost the Dodgers dearly, Jim Lefebvre
Jim Lefebvre
bruising his heel crossing the plate with the second of the two runs. The Dodgers, already short on hitting (Lefebvre was batting .400 at the time), went with Dick Tracewski (.118 for the Series) at second base the rest of the way. The Twins received a scare of their own in the seventh inning. Catcher Earl Battey, chasing a popup, collided full speed with the railing used to cover sub-field level "dugout seats" next to the Twins dugout. Battey crumpled in a heap holding his neck and was replaced by Jerry Zimmerman. Los Angeles continued to score runs on a Willie Davis single and a Lou Johnson double in the fifth, then a Wills double in the sixth. Osteen, who as a pitcher for the Senators had had a perfect 5–0 record against the Twins, completed the game by getting Zimmerman to ground into a double play. He allowed only five hits, succeeding where the Dodger aces hadn't in Games 1 and 2. Game 4[edit]

Sunday, October 10, 1965 1:00 pm (PT) at Dodger Stadium
Dodger Stadium
in Los Angeles, California

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E

Minnesota 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 5 2

Los Angeles 1 1 0 1 0 3 0 1 X 7 10 0

WP: Don Drysdale
Don Drysdale
(1–1)   LP: Mudcat Grant
Mudcat Grant
(1–1) Home runs: MIN: Harmon Killebrew
Harmon Killebrew
(1), Tony Oliva
Tony Oliva
(1) LAD: Wes Parker (1), Lou Johnson (1)

In a rematch of Game 1 pitchers Drysdale and Grant, the Dodgers ace prevailed, allowing only two runs on five hits. He had eleven strikeouts, fanning Jimmie Hall and Don Mincher three times each. Grant gave up three runs in the first five innings, then was removed in the sixth, when the Dodgers got three more. The Twins opened the game with aggression when Sandy Valdespino tried to stretch a single into a double. Lou Johnson, not known as a great fielder, gunned down Valdespino at second. The Dodgers scored twice without getting the ball out of the infield. Maury Wills
Maury Wills
collided at first base with Twins second baseman Frank Quilici
Frank Quilici
on an infield single as pitcher Grant was slow to cover the bag. The play cartwheeled Wills backwards, but the Dodger dusted himself off and promptly stole second. Wills went to third on another infield single, this time by the speedy Willie Davis, as Grant was again slow to cover. Wills scored when Ron Fairly
Ron Fairly
beat out a potential double-play grounder. In the bottom of the second, Dodger speed made up for what seemed a lack of power. Parker bunted a single, then stole second and took third when Grant's throw went wild. Parker scored when Roseboro's grounder to second got through Quilici. The Dodgers then showed power with Parker and Johnson home runs. The Twins had scored their two runs on home runs from Killebrew and Oliva. Back in form, Drysdale evened the series as L.A. won, 7–2. Game 5[edit]

Monday, October 11, 1965 1:00 pm (PT) at Dodger Stadium
Dodger Stadium
in Los Angeles, California

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E

Minnesota 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 1

Los Angeles 2 0 2 1 0 0 2 0 X 7 14 0

WP: Sandy Koufax
Sandy Koufax
(1–1)   LP: Jim Kaat
Jim Kaat
(1–1)

In Game 5, the Minnesota
Minnesota
pitcher who had done so well in Game 2, Jim Kaat, did not do as well this time, as the Dodgers won their third straight. Koufax give up only four hits and one walk, striking out ten. Kaat gave up two runs quickly in the first inning, then again in the third. Dave Boswell came in to attempt to stop the bleeding and Jim Perry did the same. Koufax basically put the game out of reach in the seventh, when he helped himself out with an RBI single to score Fairly. The Dodgers won went up 3–2 in the series. Fourteen-year-old future major league pitcher Craig Swan, a member of the Long Beach, California
California
Pony League champions, threw out the first pitch. In the first inning, Dodger speed forced the Twins into fielding mishaps. Wills doubled and Gilliam singled in the run. Willie Davis bunted and third-baseman Killebrew's hurried throw to first went high, enabling the streaking Davis to make it all the way to third and plating Gilliam. The Dodgers collected 14 hits and four stolen bases, while Koufax steadily kept the Twins in check for the shutout. Game 6[edit]

October 13, 1965 2:00 pm (CT) at Metropolitan Stadium
Metropolitan Stadium
in Bloomington, Minnesota

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E

Los Angeles 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 6 1

Minnesota 0 0 0 2 0 3 0 0 X 5 6 1

WP: Mudcat Grant
Mudcat Grant
(2–1)   LP: Claude Osteen (1–1) Home runs: LAD: Ron Fairly
Ron Fairly
(2) MIN: Bob Allison
Bob Allison
(1), Mudcat Grant
Mudcat Grant
(1)

In Game 6, Osteen did not fare as well as he had in his last start. In the fourth inning, Battey reached on an error by Dick Tracewski, followed by a Bob Allison
Bob Allison
two-run home run. Grant, for the Twins, was on his game once again. He also helped himself, as had Koufax for L.A. the game before, but in this case with a towering three-run home run, after Quilici was intentionally walked to get to Grant. A Fairly home run, his second of the series, put the Dodgers on the board to make the score 5–1, but that's all they would get as Grant pitched a complete game. Twins manager Sam Mele
Sam Mele
chose to leave veteran pitchers Pascual and Perry and youngster Jim Merritt in the bullpen, instead going with Grant on two days' rest. Twins catcher Earl Battey
Earl Battey
brought the nearly 50,000 Metropolitan Stadium
Metropolitan Stadium
fans to their feet by leading off with a triple past a diving Willie Davis in center. Battey showed no outward ill-effects of his collision with the railing in Game 3, diving headfirst into third base on the play. Osteen promptly struck out Allison and Quilici, however, to quell the threat. Battey continued his fine play in the fourth by hustling to first when Tracewski booted his groundball, and Allison followed with a home run. Grant pitched solidly and the Twins tied the series at 3–3. Game 7[edit]

Thursday, October 14, 1965 2:00 pm (CT) at Metropolitan Stadium in Bloomington, Minnesota

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E

Los Angeles 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 7 0

Minnesota 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1

WP: Sandy Koufax
Sandy Koufax
(2–1)   LP: Jim Kaat
Jim Kaat
(1–2) Home runs: LAD: Lou Johnson (2) MIN: None

Dodger manager Walt Alston
Walt Alston
was torn between starting Drysdale on normal rest or Koufax with only two days' rest. He decided on the left-handed Koufax, figuring if needed he would use the right-handed Drysdale in relief, then go back to his left-handed relief ace Ron Perranoski. Koufax told announcer Vin Scully
Vin Scully
in a post-game interview that he and Drysdale had come to the ballpark not knowing which would be on the mound. According to Koufax, the manager announced the decision purely in strategic terms regarding lefty vs. righty, saying he worded his announcement without even using the pitchers' names, saying only that he thought he'd "like to start the left-hander." The Twins went with Kaat, also starting on two days' rest. Both managers had relief pitchers warming up as their starters began the game. Koufax had trouble throwing his curveball for strikes but escaped a couple of early jams, including one in the third inning when Zoilo Versailles stole second base with one out, but was called back after batter Joe Nossek was ruled out for interference. Koufax effectively gave up on his curveball and pitched the late innings almost exclusively with fastballs, still baffling the hard-hitting Twins. In the fourth inning, Dodger left fielder Lou Johnson told Koufax that he would get him the only run he would need. Johnson promptly stepped to the plate and hit one off the left-field foul pole to give the Dodgers a 1–0 lead. Ron Fairly
Ron Fairly
followed with a double and scored on a Wes Parker single. The two runs came on three consecutive pitches. Knowing Kaat was on short rest, manager Mele pulled him quickly. Al Worthington, Johnny Klippstein, Jim Merritt, and Jim Perry combined to shut out the Dodgers for the rest of the game. The Twins threatened again in the fifth inning when they had runners on first and second with only one out. Versailles hit a hard grounder down the third base line that appeared to be going for a double. This could have ended Koufax's day as Drysdale was warming up in the bullpen. But third baseman Jim Gilliam
Jim Gilliam
(who was often replaced late in games for defensive reasons) made a diving, backhanded stop and stepped on third for a force. Koufax bore down and got the third out. He ended up tossing a three-hit shutout, striking out ten in one of the greatest Game 7 pitching performances ever. "Sweet Lou" Johnson hit two home runs, including the game-winner in the clinching Game 7. No relief pitchers were used by the winning team in any game of this series; the winning starting pitcher went the distance in all seven games. This had not happened since 1940, and has never been repeated since. The Twins' loss in Game 7 remains the only World Series
World Series
game the Twins have lost at home, having later won all their home games in 1987 and 1991. Through 2017, the Twins have never won a road World Series
World Series
Game (not including when the franchise was the original Washington Senators). The National League
National League
won its third consecutive World Series
World Series
(Dodgers in 1963, St. Louis Cardinals
St. Louis Cardinals
in 1964). The Senior Circuit would not claim back-to-back titles again until 1975 and 1976, when the Cincinnati Reds did so. Although the Dodgers had played the maximum seven games in four best-of-seven World Series
World Series
when they were located in Brooklyn (in 1947, 1952, 1955, and 1956), 1965 marked the first time they had done so when located in Los Angeles. It did not happen again until 2017. The Brooklyn Dodgers had also played seven games in the 1920 World Series when it was a best-of-nine series, losing to Cleveland five games to two. Composite box[edit] 1965 World Series
World Series
(4–3): Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
(N.L.) over Minnesota Twins (A.L.)

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E

Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Dodgers 3 2 2 6 1 4 4 1 1 24 64 6

Minnesota
Minnesota
Twins 0 1 6 3 0 7 1 2 0 20 42 5

Total attendance: 364,326   Average attendance: 52,047 Winning player's share: $10,297   Losing player's share: $6,634[11]

Aftermath[edit] The Dodgers would return to the World Series
World Series
the following year, only to be swept in four straight games by the Baltimore Orioles. The Dodgers scored twice in Game 1, but those would be only runs they would score in the entire series. Sandy Koufax
Sandy Koufax
retired after the series at age 30, due to chronic arthritis and bursitis in his pitching elbow. Meanwhile, the Twins would have to wait twenty-two more years before returning to the World Series
World Series
in 1987, when they would finally win their first championship since 1924 (known then as the Washington Senators), and their first since moving to Minnesota, by beating the St. Louis Cardinals
St. Louis Cardinals
in seven games. That series was the first series in which the home team won all games, a feat Sandy Koufax
Sandy Koufax
prevented in Game 7 of this series. Since the 1987 Series, that feat has been successfully accomplished twice more in 1991 and 2001. Notes[edit]

^ Interview with Sandy Koufax
Sandy Koufax
announcing his retirement from Major League Baseball, Dodger Stadium, The First 25 years (VHS videotape). 1987. ISBN 0-88159-882-8.  ^ "1965 Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
box scores". Archived from the original on June 4, 2011. Retrieved May 30, 2011.  ^ Neft, David S.; Cohen, Richard; Neft, Michael L., eds. (2003). The Sports Encyclopedia 1: Baseball (23rd ed.). New York: St Martin's Griffen. p. 369.  ^ "1965 World Series
World Series
Game 1 – Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
vs. Minnesota Twins". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.  ^ "1965 World Series
World Series
Game 2 – Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
vs. Minnesota Twins". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.  ^ "1965 World Series
World Series
Game 3 – Minnesota Twins
Minnesota Twins
vs. Los Angeles Dodgers". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.  ^ "1965 World Series
World Series
Game 4 – Minnesota Twins
Minnesota Twins
vs. Los Angeles Dodgers". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.  ^ "1965 World Series
World Series
Game 5 – Minnesota Twins
Minnesota Twins
vs. Los Angeles Dodgers". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.  ^ "1965 World Series
World Series
Game 6 – Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
vs. Minnesota Twins". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.  ^ "1965 World Series
World Series
Game 7 – Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
vs. Minnesota Twins". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.  ^ " World Series
World Series
Gate Receipts and Player Shares". Baseball Almanac. Archived from the original on May 2, 2009. Retrieved June 14, 2009. 

See also[edit]

1965 Japan Series

References[edit]

Cohen, Richard M.; Neft, David S. (1990). The World Series: Complete Play-By-Play of Every Game, 1903–1989. New York: St. Martin's Press. ISBN 0-312-03960-3.  Reichler, Joseph (1982). The Baseball Encyclopedia (5th ed.). Macmillan Publishing. p. 2173. ISBN 0-02-579010-2.  Forman, Sean L. "1965 World Series". Baseball-Reference.com – Major League Statistics and Information. Archived from the original on November 30, 2007. Retrieved December 9, 2007. 

External links[edit]

1965 World Series
World Series
at WorldSeries.com (MLB.com) 1965 World Series
World Series
at Baseball Almanac 1965 World Series
World Series
at Baseball-Reference.com The 1965 Post-Season Games (box scores and play-by-play) at Retrosheet History of the World Series
World Series
- 1965 at The SportingNews. Archived from the original on 2008.

v t e

World Series

No World Series
World Series
was held in 1904 because the NL champions refused to participate; no World Series
World Series
was held in 1994 due to a players' strike.

1900s–1910s

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See also

Pre- World Series
World Series
champions World Series
World Series
champions Most Valuable Players Starting pitchers Babe Ruth Award Commissioner's Trophy World Series
World Series
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Book:World Series Category:World Series

v t e

Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Dodgers

Formerly the Brooklyn Robins and the Brooklyn Dodgers. Based in Los Angeles, California

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Los Angeles Dodgers
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Los Angeles
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Culture

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Roy Campanella
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Lore

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World Series
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Los Angeles
Angels New York Yankees

Subway Series

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Key personnel

Owner: Guggenheim Baseball Management President: Stan Kasten President of Baseball Operations: Andrew Friedman General Manager: Farhan Zaidi Manager: Dave Roberts

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1955 1959 1963 1965 1981 1988

League pennants (23)

American Association: 1889 National League: 1890 1899 1900 1916 1920 1941 1947 1949 1952 1953 1955 1956 1959 1963 1965 1966 1974 1977 1978 1981 1988 2017

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Wild card berths (2)

1996 2006

Minor league affiliates

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Seasons (136)

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v t e

Minnesota
Minnesota
Twins

Formerly the Washington Nationals and the Washington Senators Based in Minneapolis, Minnesota
Minnesota
(Twin Cities)

Franchise

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in Washington

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Culture and lore

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Senators Hall of Famers

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The 1965 World Series
World Series
featured the National League
National League
champion Los Angeles Dodgers against the American League
American League
champion Minnesota
Minnesota
Twins. It is best remembered[according to whom?] for the heroics of Sandy Koufax, who was named the series MVP. Koufax did not pitch in Game 1, as it fell on the Jewish holy day of Yom Kippur, but pitched in Game 2 and then tossed shutouts in Games 5 and 7 (with only two days of rest in between) to win the championship. The Twins had won their first pennant since 1933 when the team was known as the Washington Senators. The Dodgers, prevailing in seven games, captured their second title in three years, and their third since moving to Los Angeles
Los Angeles
in 1958.

Contents

1 Background 2 Summary 3 Matchups

3.1 Game 1 3.2 Game 2 3.3 Game 3 3.4 Game 4 3.5 Game 5 3.6 Game 6 3.7 Game 7

4 Composite box 5 Aftermath 6 Notes 7 See also 8 References 9 External links

Background[edit] Both teams improved from sixth-place finishes in 1964; the Twins won the A.L. pennant with relative ease while the Dodgers were locked in a season-long five-way battle in the N.L. among themselves, the Giants, Pirates, Reds, and Braves. After the Giants won their 14th-consecutive game to take a ​4 1⁄2-game lead on September 16, the Dodgers went on a 13-game winning streak over the final two weeks of the season to clinch the pennant on the next to last day of the season over the second place rival Giants. During the 1965 Season, the Dodgers relied heavily on the arms of Sandy Koufax
Sandy Koufax
and Don Drysdale, and would rely on them even more in the World Series, as the Dodgers only used seven pitchers. The Dodgers' strong core of pitchers, which also included Claude Osteen and Ron Perranoski, kept them in the pennant race and into the Series. Koufax, surviving on a steady diet of Cortisone and pain killers for his arthritic left elbow,[1] pitched five times in 15 days down the stretch, winning four (three shutouts), including 13 strikeouts in the pennant winner against Milwaukee.[2] Dodger hitting however remained strictly popgun, especially after Tommy Davis went down in late April for the season with a broken ankle.[3] Manager Walter Alston
Walter Alston
promptly called up 12-year minor league veteran Lou Johnson from Spokane. Johnson led the Dodgers, along with ROY Jim Lefebvre, in home runs with just 12. The Twins, managed by Sam Mele, had a more balanced attack, equally strong in pitching and hitting, although their defense committed 173 errors including 39 by shortstop Zoilo Versalles. Offensively Mele again had balance with good hitting, power and speed up and down his lineup that included AL's leading hitter Tony Oliva
Tony Oliva
(.321), and 20-plus home runs from five different players. Pitching was spearheaded by 20-game winner Mudcat Grant, Jim "Kitty" Kaat, and Camilo Pascual. This was only the second World Series
World Series
where both teams were located west of the Mississippi River. The first occurred in 1944, when the St. Louis Browns faced their Sportsman's Park
Sportsman's Park
tenants, the St. Louis Cardinals. This was the first of eleven consecutive World Series
World Series
that did not have the New York Yankees
New York Yankees
playing in it; it was the longest such streak until 1993, when the Toronto Blue Jays
Toronto Blue Jays
claimed the second of their back-to-back World Series
World Series
championships by defeating the Philadelphia Phillies. It was also the first series in which both teams had had losing records the previous year. This has since been repeated two other times, both times also involving the Twins—in 1987 and 1991. This World Series
World Series
was the first in which all games were played in cities that did not have National League
National League
or American League
American League
teams in 1903, the year of the first modern World Series. Also, it is the earliest World Series
World Series
whose telecasts are known to survive in their entirety; the CBC has complete kinescopes of all seven games in its archives. Summary[edit] The Twins won the first two games of the series against Don Drysdale and Sandy Koufax, but once Claude Osteen shut out the Twins in Game 3, things turned around. Willie Davis of The Dodgers tied a World Series record stealing 3 bases in one Game, game 5, the record was set by Honus Wagner in 1909. The Dodgers proceeded to win the three middle games at Dodger Stadium
Dodger Stadium
and Koufax would pitch two shutouts including a three-hitter with ten strikeouts to clinch. Ron Fairly
Ron Fairly
hit two home runs for the Dodgers, both in losing efforts. NL Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
(4) vs. AL Minnesota Twins
Minnesota Twins
(3)

Game Date Score Location Time Attendance 

1 October 6 Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
– 2, Minnesota Twins
Minnesota Twins
– 8 Metropolitan Stadium 2:29 47,797[4] 

2 October 7 Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
– 1, Minnesota Twins
Minnesota Twins
– 5 Metropolitan Stadium 2:13 48,700[5] 

3 October 9 Minnesota Twins
Minnesota Twins
– 0, Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
– 4 Dodger Stadium 2:06 55,934[6] 

4 October 10 Minnesota Twins
Minnesota Twins
– 2, Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
– 7 Dodger Stadium 2:15 55,920[7] 

5 October 11 Minnesota Twins
Minnesota Twins
– 0, Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
– 7 Dodger Stadium 2:34 55,801[8] 

6 October 13 Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
– 1, Minnesota Twins
Minnesota Twins
– 5 Metropolitan Stadium 2:16 49,578[9] 

7 October 14 Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
– 2, Minnesota Twins
Minnesota Twins
– 0 Metropolitan Stadium 2:27 50,596[10]

Matchups[edit] Game 1[edit]

Wednesday, October 6, 1965 2:00 pm (CT) at Metropolitan Stadium in Bloomington, Minnesota

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E

Los Angeles 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 10 1

Minnesota 0 1 6 0 0 1 0 0 X 8 10 0

WP: Mudcat Grant
Mudcat Grant
(1–0)   LP: Don Drysdale
Don Drysdale
(0–1) Home runs: LAD: Ron Fairly
Ron Fairly
(1) MIN: Don Mincher (1), Zoilo Versalles
Zoilo Versalles
(1)

Hall of Famer Sandy Koufax

Game 1 was set to be a pitching duel between Dodgers' Don Drysdale
Don Drysdale
and the Twins' Mudcat Grant
Mudcat Grant
(21–7, 3.30 ERA on the year). Drysdale was starting because the game fell on Yom Kippur, the holiest day of the year for people of the Jewish faith. Dodger ace Sandy Koufax, who was Jewish, stated he would not pitch that day. In the Twins' third inning any thought of a pitchers' duel was put to rest. Going into that inning, it was 1–1. Coming out, it was 7–1. It started with a Frank Quilici
Frank Quilici
double to left field, followed by an error by Jim Lefebvre, allowing the pitcher Grant to reach. Then, shortstop Zoilo Versalles
Zoilo Versalles
stepped to the plate. He had hit nineteen home runs in the regular season and would later win the AL MVP Award for that year. He crushed a pitch from Drysdale for a three-run home run to make the score, 4–1. However, the Twins' scoring wasn't over. With still no one out, left fielder Sandy Valdespino began things again with a double. After a few outs and baserunners, and a single by Harmon Killebrew, the Twins had two runners again. With three straight singles (Earl Battey, Don Mincher, and Quilici), scoring three unearned runs, the Twins had jumped out to a six-run lead and would never look back, winning the game 8–2. Frank Quilici
Frank Quilici
set a World Series
World Series
record with his two hits in the third inning. Mudcat Grant
Mudcat Grant
was the first black World Series
World Series
game-winner for an American League
American League
team, and just the seventh pitcher to homer in a World Series
World Series
game. The Dodgers had scored their runs on a Ron Fairly
Ron Fairly
homer and a Maury Wills bunt single that scored Lefebvre. Grant received the win while Drysdale took the loss. In the postgame news conference, a reporter jokingly said to Dodger manager Walter Alston, "I bet you wish Drysdale was Jewish too." Game 2[edit]

Thursday, October 7, 1965 2:00 pm (CT) at Metropolitan Stadium
Metropolitan Stadium
in Bloomington, Minnesota

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E

Los Angeles 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 7 3

Minnesota 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 2 X 5 9 0

WP: Jim Kaat
Jim Kaat
(1–0)   LP: Sandy Koufax
Sandy Koufax
(0–1)

In Game 2, the Twins this time got to Dodger ace Sandy Koufax. Minnesota's pitcher, this time Jim Kaat, again shut down the Dodgers' weak offense. A heavy rain storm soaked Metropolitan Stadium overnight, and the two teams slogged their way through the first five innings. In the top of the fifth, Ron Fairly
Ron Fairly
singled, then left-fielder Bob Allison
Bob Allison
made a diving, sliding catch of a fly ball off the bat of Jim Lefebvre, preventing a run. Aided by an error, the Twins broke the scoreless tie in the sixth, Versalles hit a missile shot and when Jim Gilliam
Jim Gilliam
bobbled the ball at third base, the ball ricocheted off Gilliam and into left field. Versalles reached on the two-base error, then scored on a Tony Oliva
Tony Oliva
double. Killebrew followed with a single, plating Oliva. That is all the runs the Twins would need, though Kaat added insurance in the eighth with a two-run base hit of his own. The Twins went up 2–0 in the Series. Game 3[edit]

Saturday, October 9, 1965 1:00 pm (PT) at Dodger Stadium
Dodger Stadium
in Los Angeles, California

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E

Minnesota 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0

Los Angeles 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 X 4 10 1

WP: Claude Osteen (1–0)   LP: Camilo Pascual (0–1)

In Game 3, pressure was on Claude Osteen to have a good start so Los Angeles would not go down 0–3. He faced Camilo Pascual, who had a quality (though somewhat injury plagued) year (9–3, 3.35 ERA). Dodger Stadium
Dodger Stadium
was filled to capacity and fans were treated to an appearance from Casey Stengel, a member of the 1916 Dodgers World Series team. Stengel, sans his cane despite a broken hip, hobbled on to the field and threw out the first pitch. In the first inning, Versalles led off with a double. But with two men on, Versalles was caught stealing home on the front end of an attempted double steal. In the fourth, Johnny Roseboro
Johnny Roseboro
put the Dodgers on the board with a two-run single. The play cost the Dodgers dearly, Jim Lefebvre
Jim Lefebvre
bruising his heel crossing the plate with the second of the two runs. The Dodgers, already short on hitting (Lefebvre was batting .400 at the time), went with Dick Tracewski (.118 for the Series) at second base the rest of the way. The Twins received a scare of their own in the seventh inning. Catcher Earl Battey, chasing a popup, collided full speed with the railing used to cover sub-field level "dugout seats" next to the Twins dugout. Battey crumpled in a heap holding his neck and was replaced by Jerry Zimmerman. Los Angeles continued to score runs on a Willie Davis single and a Lou Johnson double in the fifth, then a Wills double in the sixth. Osteen, who as a pitcher for the Senators had had a perfect 5–0 record against the Twins, completed the game by getting Zimmerman to ground into a double play. He allowed only five hits, succeeding where the Dodger aces hadn't in Games 1 and 2. Game 4[edit]

Sunday, October 10, 1965 1:00 pm (PT) at Dodger Stadium
Dodger Stadium
in Los Angeles, California

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E

Minnesota 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 5 2

Los Angeles 1 1 0 1 0 3 0 1 X 7 10 0

WP: Don Drysdale
Don Drysdale
(1–1)   LP: Mudcat Grant
Mudcat Grant
(1–1) Home runs: MIN: Harmon Killebrew
Harmon Killebrew
(1), Tony Oliva
Tony Oliva
(1) LAD: Wes Parker (1), Lou Johnson (1)

In a rematch of Game 1 pitchers Drysdale and Grant, the Dodgers ace prevailed, allowing only two runs on five hits. He had eleven strikeouts, fanning Jimmie Hall and Don Mincher three times each. Grant gave up three runs in the first five innings, then was removed in the sixth, when the Dodgers got three more. The Twins opened the game with aggression when Sandy Valdespino tried to stretch a single into a double. Lou Johnson, not known as a great fielder, gunned down Valdespino at second. The Dodgers scored twice without getting the ball out of the infield. Maury Wills
Maury Wills
collided at first base with Twins second baseman Frank Quilici
Frank Quilici
on an infield single as pitcher Grant was slow to cover the bag. The play cartwheeled Wills backwards, but the Dodger dusted himself off and promptly stole second. Wills went to third on another infield single, this time by the speedy Willie Davis, as Grant was again slow to cover. Wills scored when Ron Fairly
Ron Fairly
beat out a potential double-play grounder. In the bottom of the second, Dodger speed made up for what seemed a lack of power. Parker bunted a single, then stole second and took third when Grant's throw went wild. Parker scored when Roseboro's grounder to second got through Quilici. The Dodgers then showed power with Parker and Johnson home runs. The Twins had scored their two runs on home runs from Killebrew and Oliva. Back in form, Drysdale evened the series as L.A. won, 7–2. Game 5[edit]

Monday, October 11, 1965 1:00 pm (PT) at Dodger Stadium
Dodger Stadium
in Los Angeles, California

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E

Minnesota 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 1

Los Angeles 2 0 2 1 0 0 2 0 X 7 14 0

WP: Sandy Koufax
Sandy Koufax
(1–1)   LP: Jim Kaat
Jim Kaat
(1–1)

In Game 5, the Minnesota
Minnesota
pitcher who had done so well in Game 2, Jim Kaat, did not do as well this time, as the Dodgers won their third straight. Koufax give up only four hits and one walk, striking out ten. Kaat gave up two runs quickly in the first inning, then again in the third. Dave Boswell came in to attempt to stop the bleeding and Jim Perry did the same. Koufax basically put the game out of reach in the seventh, when he helped himself out with an RBI single to score Fairly. The Dodgers won went up 3–2 in the series. Fourteen-year-old future major league pitcher Craig Swan, a member of the Long Beach, California
California
Pony League champions, threw out the first pitch. In the first inning, Dodger speed forced the Twins into fielding mishaps. Wills doubled and Gilliam singled in the run. Willie Davis bunted and third-baseman Killebrew's hurried throw to first went high, enabling the streaking Davis to make it all the way to third and plating Gilliam. The Dodgers collected 14 hits and four stolen bases, while Koufax steadily kept the Twins in check for the shutout. Game 6[edit]

October 13, 1965 2:00 pm (CT) at Metropolitan Stadium
Metropolitan Stadium
in Bloomington, Minnesota

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E

Los Angeles 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 6 1

Minnesota 0 0 0 2 0 3 0 0 X 5 6 1

WP: Mudcat Grant
Mudcat Grant
(2–1)   LP: Claude Osteen (1–1) Home runs: LAD: Ron Fairly
Ron Fairly
(2) MIN: Bob Allison
Bob Allison
(1), Mudcat Grant
Mudcat Grant
(1)

In Game 6, Osteen did not fare as well as he had in his last start. In the fourth inning, Battey reached on an error by Dick Tracewski, followed by a Bob Allison
Bob Allison
two-run home run. Grant, for the Twins, was on his game once again. He also helped himself, as had Koufax for L.A. the game before, but in this case with a towering three-run home run, after Quilici was intentionally walked to get to Grant. A Fairly home run, his second of the series, put the Dodgers on the board to make the score 5–1, but that's all they would get as Grant pitched a complete game. Twins manager Sam Mele
Sam Mele
chose to leave veteran pitchers Pascual and Perry and youngster Jim Merritt in the bullpen, instead going with Grant on two days' rest. Twins catcher Earl Battey
Earl Battey
brought the nearly 50,000 Metropolitan Stadium
Metropolitan Stadium
fans to their feet by leading off with a triple past a diving Willie Davis in center. Battey showed no outward ill-effects of his collision with the railing in Game 3, diving headfirst into third base on the play. Osteen promptly struck out Allison and Quilici, however, to quell the threat. Battey continued his fine play in the fourth by hustling to first when Tracewski booted his groundball, and Allison followed with a home run. Grant pitched solidly and the Twins tied the series at 3–3. Game 7[edit]

Thursday, October 14, 1965 2:00 pm (CT) at Metropolitan Stadium in Bloomington, Minnesota

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E

Los Angeles 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 7 0

Minnesota 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1

WP: Sandy Koufax
Sandy Koufax
(2–1)   LP: Jim Kaat
Jim Kaat
(1–2) Home runs: LAD: Lou Johnson (2) MIN: None

Dodger manager Walt Alston
Walt Alston
was torn between starting Drysdale on normal rest or Koufax with only two days' rest. He decided on the left-handed Koufax, figuring if needed he would use the right-handed Drysdale in relief, then go back to his left-handed relief ace Ron Perranoski. Koufax told announcer Vin Scully
Vin Scully
in a post-game interview that he and Drysdale had come to the ballpark not knowing which would be on the mound. According to Koufax, the manager announced the decision purely in strategic terms regarding lefty vs. righty, saying he worded his announcement without even using the pitchers' names, saying only that he thought he'd "like to start the left-hander." The Twins went with Kaat, also starting on two days' rest. Both managers had relief pitchers warming up as their starters began the game. Koufax had trouble throwing his curveball for strikes but escaped a couple of early jams, including one in the third inning when Zoilo Versailles stole second base with one out, but was called back after batter Joe Nossek was ruled out for interference. Koufax effectively gave up on his curveball and pitched the late innings almost exclusively with fastballs, still baffling the hard-hitting Twins. In the fourth inning, Dodger left fielder Lou Johnson told Koufax that he would get him the only run he would need. Johnson promptly stepped to the plate and hit one off the left-field foul pole to give the Dodgers a 1–0 lead. Ron Fairly
Ron Fairly
followed with a double and scored on a Wes Parker single. The two runs came on three consecutive pitches. Knowing Kaat was on short rest, manager Mele pulled him quickly. Al Worthington, Johnny Klippstein, Jim Merritt, and Jim Perry combined to shut out the Dodgers for the rest of the game. The Twins threatened again in the fifth inning when they had runners on first and second with only one out. Versailles hit a hard grounder down the third base line that appeared to be going for a double. This could have ended Koufax's day as Drysdale was warming up in the bullpen. But third baseman Jim Gilliam
Jim Gilliam
(who was often replaced late in games for defensive reasons) made a diving, backhanded stop and stepped on third for a force. Koufax bore down and got the third out. He ended up tossing a three-hit shutout, striking out ten in one of the greatest Game 7 pitching performances ever. "Sweet Lou" Johnson hit two home runs, including the game-winner in the clinching Game 7. No relief pitchers were used by the winning team in any game of this series; the winning starting pitcher went the distance in all seven games. This had not happened since 1940, and has never been repeated since. The Twins' loss in Game 7 remains the only World Series
World Series
game the Twins have lost at home, having later won all their home games in 1987 and 1991. Through 2017, the Twins have never won a road World Series
World Series
Game (not including when the franchise was the original Washington Senators). The National League
National League
won its third consecutive World Series
World Series
(Dodgers in 1963, St. Louis Cardinals
St. Louis Cardinals
in 1964). The Senior Circuit would not claim back-to-back titles again until 1975 and 1976, when the Cincinnati Reds did so. Although the Dodgers had played the maximum seven games in four best-of-seven World Series
World Series
when they were located in Brooklyn (in 1947, 1952, 1955, and 1956), 1965 marked the first time they had done so when located in Los Angeles. It did not happen again until 2017. The Brooklyn Dodgers had also played seven games in the 1920 World Series when it was a best-of-nine series, losing to Cleveland five games to two. Composite box[edit] 1965 World Series
World Series
(4–3): Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
(N.L.) over Minnesota Twins (A.L.)

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E

Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Dodgers 3 2 2 6 1 4 4 1 1 24 64 6

Minnesota
Minnesota
Twins 0 1 6 3 0 7 1 2 0 20 42 5

Total attendance: 364,326   Average attendance: 52,047 Winning player's share: $10,297   Losing player's share: $6,634[11]

Aftermath[edit] The Dodgers would return to the World Series
World Series
the following year, only to be swept in four straight games by the Baltimore Orioles. The Dodgers scored twice in Game 1, but those would be only runs they would score in the entire series. Sandy Koufax
Sandy Koufax
retired after the series at age 30, due to chronic arthritis and bursitis in his pitching elbow. Meanwhile, the Twins would have to wait twenty-two more years before returning to the World Series
World Series
in 1987, when they would finally win their first championship since 1924 (known then as the Washington Senators), and their first since moving to Minnesota, by beating the St. Louis Cardinals
St. Louis Cardinals
in seven games. That series was the first series in which the home team won all games, a feat Sandy Koufax
Sandy Koufax
prevented in Game 7 of this series. Since the 1987 Series, that feat has been successfully accomplished twice more in 1991 and 2001. Notes[edit]

^ Interview with Sandy Koufax
Sandy Koufax
announcing his retirement from Major League Baseball, Dodger Stadium, The First 25 years (VHS videotape). 1987. ISBN 0-88159-882-8.  ^ "1965 Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
box scores". Archived from the original on June 4, 2011. Retrieved May 30, 2011.  ^ Neft, David S.; Cohen, Richard; Neft, Michael L., eds. (2003). The Sports Encyclopedia 1: Baseball (23rd ed.). New York: St Martin's Griffen. p. 369.  ^ "1965 World Series
World Series
Game 1 – Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
vs. Minnesota Twins". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.  ^ "1965 World Series
World Series
Game 2 – Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
vs. Minnesota Twins". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.  ^ "1965 World Series
World Series
Game 3 – Minnesota Twins
Minnesota Twins
vs. Los Angeles Dodgers". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.  ^ "1965 World Series
World Series
Game 4 – Minnesota Twins
Minnesota Twins
vs. Los Angeles Dodgers". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.  ^ "1965 World Series
World Series
Game 5 – Minnesota Twins
Minnesota Twins
vs. Los Angeles Dodgers". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.  ^ "1965 World Series
World Series
Game 6 – Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
vs. Minnesota Twins". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.  ^ "1965 World Series
World Series
Game 7 – Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
vs. Minnesota Twins". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.  ^ " World Series
World Series
Gate Receipts and Player Shares". Baseball Almanac. Archived from the original on May 2, 2009. Retrieved June 14, 2009. 

See also[edit]

1965 Japan Series

References[edit]

Cohen, Richard M.; Neft, David S. (1990). The World Series: Complete Play-By-Play of Every Game, 1903–1989. New York: St. Martin's Press. ISBN 0-312-03960-3.  Reichler, Joseph (1982). The Baseball Encyclopedia (5th ed.). Macmillan Publishing. p. 2173. ISBN 0-02-579010-2.  Forman, Sean L. "1965 World Series". Baseball-Reference.com – Major League Statistics and Information. Archived from the original on November 30, 2007. Retrieved December 9, 2007. 

External links[edit]

1965 World Series
World Series
at WorldSeries.com (MLB.com) 1965 World Series
World Series
at Baseball Almanac 1965 World Series
World Series
at Baseball-Reference.com The 1965 Post-Season Games (box scores and play-by-play) at Retrosheet History of the World Series
World Series
- 1965 at The SportingNews. Archived from the original on 2008.

v t e

World Series

No World Series
World Series
was held in 1904 because the NL champions refused to participate; no World Series
World Series
was held in 1994 due to a players' strike.

1900s–1910s

1900 · 1901 · 1902 · 1903 1904 1905 1906 1907 1908 1909 1910 1911 1912 1913 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919

1920s–1930s

1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939

1940s–1950s

1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959

1960s–1970s

1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979

1980s–1990s

1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999

2000s–2010s

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

See also

Pre- World Series
World Series
champions World Series
World Series
champions Most Valuable Players Starting pitchers Babe Ruth Award Commissioner's Trophy World Series
World Series
ring Appearances Streaks Droughts Series (by franchise) Broadcasters TV ratings ALCS NLCS ALDS NLDS ALWC NLWC Game 7 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake Dauvray Cup Temple Cup Chronicle-Telegraph Cup

Book:World Series Category:World Series

v t e

Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Dodgers

Formerly the Brooklyn Robins and the Brooklyn Dodgers. Based in Los Angeles, California

Franchise

History in Brooklyn History in Los Angeles Seasons Award winners Records No-hitters Players First-round draft picks Managers Owners and executives Coaches Broadcasters Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
Radio Network SportsNet LA Hall of Famers Opening Day starting pitchers

Ballparks

Washington Park Eastern Park Ridgewood Park Washington Park Ebbets Field Roosevelt Stadium Proposed domed stadium Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Memorial Coliseum Dodger Stadium Spring training: Whittington Park Majestic Park Barrs Field Tinker Field Clearwater Athletic Field City Island Ball Park Gran Stadium de La Habana Holman Stadium Camelback Ranch

Culture

Dodger Dog The First Rick Monday saves the American flag Chavez Ravine Dodger blue "I Love L.A." Roy Campanella
Roy Campanella
Award Historic Dodgertown Vin Scully Tommy Lasorda Nancy Bea Hilda Chester 2011 bankruptcy 42

Lore

Chronicle-Telegraph Cup 1955 World Series Fernandomania Kirk Gibson's 1988 World Series
World Series
home run Orel Hershiser's scoreless innings streak Sandy Koufax's perfect game "Shot Heard 'Round the World" NL tie-breaker games/series

1946 NL tie-breaker series 1951 NL tie-breaker series 1959 NL tie-breaker series 1962 NL tie-breaker series 1980 NL West tie-breaker game

Rivalries

San Francisco Giants Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Angels New York Yankees

Subway Series

Hall of Fame members

Walter Alston Roy Campanella Don Drysdale Leo Durocher Burleigh Grimes Willie Keeler Sandy Koufax Vin Scully Tommy Lasorda Walter O'Malley Pee Wee Reese Branch Rickey Jackie Robinson Wilbert Robinson Duke Snider Don Sutton Dazzy Vance Zack Wheat

Key personnel

Owner: Guggenheim Baseball Management President: Stan Kasten President of Baseball Operations: Andrew Friedman General Manager: Farhan Zaidi Manager: Dave Roberts

World Series Championships (6)

1955 1959 1963 1965 1981 1988

League pennants (23)

American Association: 1889 National League: 1890 1899 1900 1916 1920 1941 1947 1949 1952 1953 1955 1956 1959 1963 1965 1966 1974 1977 1978 1981 1988 2017

Division titles (16)

1974 1977 1978 1981 (first half) 1983 1985 1988 1995 2004 2008 2009 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017

Wild card berths (2)

1996 2006

Minor league affiliates

AAA: Oklahoma City Dodgers AA: Tulsa Drillers A Adv.: Rancho Cucamonga Quakes A: Great Lakes Loons Rookie Adv.: Ogden Raptors Rookie: AZL Dodgers DSL Dodgers 1 DSL Dodgers 2 Minor League Rosters

Seasons (136)

1880s

1880 · 1881 · 1882 · 1883 1884 1885 1886 1887 1888 1889

1890s

1890 1891 1892 1893 1894 1895 1896 1897 1898 1899

1900s

1900 1901 1902 1903 1904 1905 1906 1907 1908 1909

1910s

1910 1911 1912 1913 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919

1920s

1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 1929

1930s

1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939

1940s

1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949

1950s

1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959

1960s

1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969

1970s

1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979

1980s

1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989

1990s

1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999

2000s

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

2010s

2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

v t e

Minnesota
Minnesota
Twins

Formerly the Washington Nationals and the Washington Senators Based in Minneapolis, Minnesota
Minnesota
(Twin Cities)

Franchise

Franchise history

in Washington

Seasons Records No-hitters Awards Players Managers Owners and executives Broadcasters First-round draft picks Opening Day starting pitchers

Ballparks

American League
American League
Park National Park Griffith Stadium Metropolitan Stadium Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome Target Field

Spring Training: Plant Field Tinker Field Hammond Stadium

Culture and lore

Homer Hanky Little Big League Major League: Back to the Minors Continental League "The Piranhas" AL Central tie-breaker games

2008 2009

Damn Yankees

musical film The Year the Yankees Lost the Pennant

Important figures

Senators Hall of Famers

Herb Carneal Goose Goslin Bucky Harris Walter Johnson Arch McDonald Sam Rice

Wall of Fame members

Rick Aguilera Bob Allison Earl Battey Bert Blyleven George Brophy Rod Carew Bob Casey Gary Gaetti Calvin Griffith Kent Hrbek Jim Kaat Tom Kelly Harmon Killebrew Tony Oliva Carl Pohlad Kirby Puckett Brad Radke Jim Rantz Zoilo Versalles Frank Viola

Key personnel

Owner Jim Pohlad President Dave St. Peter Vice president/Chief baseball officer Derek Falvey General manager Thad Levine Manager Paul Molitor

World Series championships (3)

1924 1987 1991

Pennants (6)

American League: 1924 1925 1933 1965 1987 1991

Division titles (10)

West 1969 1970 1987 1991 Central 2002 2003 2004 2006 2009 2010

Wild Card titles (1)

2017

Minor league affiliates

Triple-A Rochester Red Wings Double-A Chattanooga Lookouts A Adv. Fort Myers Miracle A Cedar Rapids Kernels Rookie Adv. Elizabethton Twins Rookie GCL Twins DSL Twins

Seasons (118)

1900s

1900 . 1901 1902 1903 1904 1905 1906 1907 1908 1909

1910s

1910 1911 1912 1913 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919

1920s

1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 1929

1930s

1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939

1940s

1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949

1950s

1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959

1960s

1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969

1970s

1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979

1980s

1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989

1990s

1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999

2000s

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

2010s

2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

v t e

Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
1965 World Series
World Series
champions

3 Willie Davis 5 Jim Lefebvre
Jim Lefebvre
(NL ROY) 6 Ron Fairly 8 Johnny Roseboro 9 Wally Moon 10 Jeff Torborg 11 John Kennedy 15 Bob Miller 16 Ron Perranoski 19 Jim Gilliam 21 Jim Brewer 22 Johnny Podres 23 Claude Osteen 28 Wes Parker 30 Maury Wills 31 Don LeJohn 32 Sandy Koufax
Sandy Koufax
(CYA and World Series
World Series
MVP) 39 Howie Reed 41 Lou Johnson 43 Willie Crawford 44 Dick Tracewski 53 Don Drysdale

Manager 24 Walter Alston

Coaches 18 Preston Gómez 19 Jim Gilliam 33 Danny Ozark 36 Lefty Phillips

Regular season

v t e

1965 MLB season by team

American League

Baltimore Boston California Chicago Cleveland Detroit Kansas City Minnesota New York Washington

National League

Chicago Cincinnati Houston Los Angeles Milwaukee New York Philadelphia Pittsburgh St. Louis San Francisco

1965 MLB draft 1965 All-Star Game 1965 World Series

v t e

Major League Baseball on NBC

Related programs

Baseball Night in America (1994–1995) Major League Baseball: An Inside Look (1979–1989) Major League Baseball Game of the Week (1957–1964; 1966–1989) Major League Baseball on NBC
Major League Baseball on NBC
Radio (1927–1938; 1957–1975) Monday Night Baseball (1967–1975)

Misc. programs

Gillette
Gillette
Cavalcade of Sports USA Thursday Game of the Week (1979–1983)

Related articles

The Baseball Network World Series
World Series
television ratings Television contracts

NBC's owned & operated TV stations

W2XBS (later WNBT) (New York Yankees, 1939–1945) WCAU
WCAU
10 (Philadelphia Phillies, 2014–present) KCST 39 (later KNSD) (San Diego Padres, 1971–1972; 1984–1986) KNTV
KNTV
11 (San Francisco Giants, 2008–present)

NBC Sports

Bay Area (San Francisco Giants) California
California
(Oakland Athletics) Chicago (Chicago Cubs & White Sox) Philadelphia (Philadelphia Phillies) New York (New York Mets)

Sponsors

Ford Gillette National Bohemian

Commentators

The Baseball Network All-Star Game ALCS ALDS NLCS NLDS World Series

Key figures

Mel Allen Jim Britt Jack Buck Skip Caray Bob Carpenter Bob Costas Dick Enberg Bill Enis Joe Garagiola Curt Gowdy Greg Gumbel Merle Harmon Ernie Harwell Charlie Jones George Kell Jon Miller Monte Moore Bob Neal Lindsey Nelson Bill O'Donnell Jay Randolph Ted Robinson Vin Scully Jim Simpson Chuck Thompson Gary Thorne Pete van Wieren Bob Wolff Jim Woods

Color commentators

Sal Bando Bucky Dent Larry Dierker Don Drysdale Leo Durocher Joe Garagiola Ken Harrelson Fred Haney Tommy Hutton Jim Kaat Sandy Koufax Tony Kubek Ron Luciano John Lowenstein Mickey Mantle Tim McCarver Joe Morgan Bobby Murcer Wes Parker Pee Wee Reese Al Rosen Tom Seaver Mike Shannon Joe Torre Bob Uecker Bill Veeck Maury Wills

Guest commentators

Rick Dempsey Barry Larkin Ronald Reagan Mike Schmidt Don Sutton Bobby Valentine

Hosts

Mike Adamle Marv Albert Len Berman Jimmy Cefalo Gayle Gardner Bryant Gumbel Bill Macatee Keith Olbermann Ahmad Rashād Hannah Storm

Field reporters

Johnny Bench Jim Gray Jimmy Roberts Craig Sager Bob Wischusen

Lore

Regular season games

#715 (1974) "The Sandberg Game" (1984)

Tie-breaker games

1951 National League
National League
tie-breaker series (Games 2-3) 1962 National League
National League
tie-breaker series

LCS games

"Go crazy folks!" (1985) Jeffrey Maier (1996) "Grand Slam Single" (1999)

World Series games

Subway Series "The Catch (1954)" Don Larsen's Perfect Game (1956) "Shoe polish incident" (1969) "Fisk Waves it Fair" (1975) Michael Sergio (1986) "It gets through Buckner!" (1986) Kirk Gibson's home run (1988) All-Century Team (1999)

Music

"Broken Wings" "Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood" "Don't Look in My Eyes" "Fame" "Limelight" "One Moment in Time" "The Stuff That Dreams Are Made Of"

Instrumentals

The Adventures of Brisco County, Jr. "Chase" "Don't Turn Away" "Take Me Out to the Ball Game" The Untouchables

World Series

1947 (Games 1 & 5) 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1978 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1995 (Games 2–3, & 6) 1997 1999

AL Championship

1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1995 (Games 3–6) 1996 1998 2000

NL Championship

1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1995 (Games 3–4) 1997 1999

AL Division Series

1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000

NL Division Series

1981 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999

All-Star Game

1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959: First–Second 1960: First–Second 1961: First–Second 1962: First–Second 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1994 1996 1998 2000

Seasons

Pre-Game of the Week

1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956

Game of the Week era

1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 (All-Star Game and World Series
World Series
only) 1966 (exclusive coverage begins) 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989

The Baseball Network
The Baseball Network
era

1994 1995

No regular season coverage

1996 1997 1998 1999 2000

v t e

Major League Baseball on NBC
Major League Baseball on NBC
Radio

Related programs

Major League Baseball on NBC
Major League Baseball on NBC
(1947–1989; 1994–2000)

Related articles

Major League Baseball on the radio

Commentators

All-Star Game World Series

Key figures

Mel Allen Red Barber Ford Bond Marty Brennaman Warren Brown Jack Buck Harry Caray Phillips Carlin Boake Carter Ken Coleman Joe Garagiola Curt Gowdy Ernie Harwell Waite Hoyt George Kell Ned Martin Graham McNamee Al Michaels Monte Moore Bob Murphy Bill O'Donnell Ross Porter Bob Prince Jack Quinlan Pee Wee Reese Phil Rizzuto By Saam Jim Simpson Chuck Thompson Ty Tyson Bob Wolff

Lore

Babe Ruth's called shot

Tie-breaker games

1959 National League
National League
tie-breaker series 1962 National League
National League
tie-breaker series

All-Star Game

1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1957 1958 1959: First–Second 1960: First–Second 1961: First–Second 1962: First–Second 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975

World Series

1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1

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