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A farthing or ha'penny bit was called a "mag" (slang for "chattering") because they were originally made from copper and made a ringing noise when dropped. The game of "penny pitching" (bouncing pennies against a wall to see how far they would rebound onto the pavement) was called "mag flying".[citation needed]

A threepenny bit (pronounced thrupney bit) was called a "Joey" (see Fourpence below);[citation needed] it was a silver or silver alloy coin from 1845 to 1937 and a 12-sided bronze coin from 1937 to 1971. It was known as a "tickey" in South Africa[18] and Southe

A convention frequently used in retail pricing was to list prices over one pound all in shillings, rather than in pounds and shillings; for example, £4-18-0 would be written as 98/– (£4.90 in decimal currency). This is still seen in shilling categories of Scottish beer, such as 90/– beer.

Sometimes, prices of luxury goods and furniture were expressed by merchants in guineas, although the guinea coin had not been struck since 1799. A guinea was 21 shillings (£1.05 in decimal currency). Professionals such as lawyers[14] and physicians, art dealers, and some others stated their fees in guineas rather than pounds, while, for example, salaries were stated in pounds per annum.[15] Historically, at some auctions, the purchaser would bid and pay in guineas but the seller would receive the same number of pounds; the commission was the same number of shillings. Tattersalls, the main auctioneer of racehorses in the United Kingdom and Ireland, continues this tradition of conducting auctions in guineas at its UK sales (in Ireland, auctions are conducted in euros). The vendor's commission is 5%.[16][17] The word "guineas" is still found in the names of some British horse races, even though their prize funds are now fixed in pounds – such as the 1,000 Guineas and 2,000 Guineas at Newmarket Racecourse.

A farthing or ha'penny bit was called a "mag" (slang for "chattering") because they were originally made from copper and made a ringing noise when dropped. The game of "penny pitching" (bouncing pennies against a wall to see how far they would rebound onto the pavement) was called "mag flying".[citation needed]

A threepenny bit (pronounced thrupney bit) was called a "Joey" (see Fourpence below);[citation needed] it was a silver or silver alloy coin from 1845 to 1937 and a 12-sided bronze coin from 1937 to 1971. It was known as a "tickey" in South Africa[18] and Southern Rhodesia.[19] In Australia it was known as a tray (also spelt trey), or a tray bit, from the French "trois" meaning three.[20]

A fourpenny bit was often known as a "groat", from the medieval four-penny silver coin of the same name. It was nicknamed a "Joey", from Joseph Hume, the Radical MP who championed its reintroduction.[citation needed] When the new threepence coin replaced the fourpence coin in circulation in 1845, it took over its nickname.

A sixpenny bit was a "tanner", derived from the Romany word tano, meaning "small" (because it was smaller than a shilling). It was also called a "tester" or "testoon" from the teston, a French coin. In Australia it was called a "Zack".

One shilling was called a "bob" or "thin 'un" (because it was thinner than a sovereign coin).[threepenny bit (pronounced thrupney bit) was called a "Joey" (see Fourpence below);[citation needed] it was a silver or silver alloy coin from 1845 to 1937 and a 12-sided bronze coin from 1937 to 1971. It was known as a "tickey" in South Africa[18] and Southern Rhodesia.[19] In Australia it was known as a tray (also spelt trey), or a tray bit, from the French "trois" meaning three.[20]

A fourpenny bit was often known as a "groat", from the medieval four-penny silver coin of the same name. It was nicknamed a "Joey", from Joseph Hume, the Radical MP who championed its reintroduction.[citation needed] When the new threepence coin replaced the fourpence coin in circulation in 1845, it took over its nickname.

A sixpenny bit was a "tanner", derived from the Romany word tano, meaning "small" (because it was smaller than a shilling). It was also called a "tester" or "testoon" from the teston, a French coin. In Australia it was called a "Zack".

One shilling was called a "bob" or "thin 'un" (because it was thinner than a sovereign coin).[citation needed] It is known in Australia as a "deener" possibly from 'Dinar' or 'Denarius'.[citation needed]

A two-shilling piece known as a florin (an early attempt at decimalisation, being ​£ 110), was in everyday use. It was referred to as "two bob", a "two-shilling bit", or a "two-bob bit".

A two-shillings-and-sixpence piece, in use until the introduction of decimal currency, was known as "half a crown" or a "half crown". They were discontinued in 1971 as there was no need for a ​12 12 New Pence coin.

A five-shilling piece was called a crown or a dollar.[12][13]

A ten-shilling note was sometimes known as "half a bar".[citation needed] It was first printed in 1914 by the Treasury during World War One to conserve silver. These early Treasury notes (especially the 1st and 2nd Series from 1914 to 1917) were nicknamed "Bradburys", from the prominent stylized signature of Sir John Bradbury, Permanent Secretary to the Treasury (1913-1919).[citation needed]

A pound was called a "nicker" or "quid". The term "quid" is said to originate from the Latin phrase quid pro quo.[citation needed] A pound coin, or sovereign, was called a "sov" or "thick 'un" (because it was thicker than a shilling). A pound note was called a "bar" or "sheet" (from its rectangular shape) or simply a "note" (e.g., "You owe me 50 notes").[citation needed]

The larger denomination notes (£5, £10, £20, £50, £100, £200, £500, and £1000) printed from the 18th century to 1943 were called "white notes" because they were printed on lightweight white paper with the text in black ink.[21]

The currency of Lancre, a kingdom in the fictional world of Discworld, is a parody of the £sd system. The currency is the same from the farthing to the shilling, but adds the Crown (worth 12 shillings), Tencrown (worth 10 crowns), Sovereign (worth 12 crowns), and Hedgehog (worth 12 sovereigns). The coins are all rather heavy (weighing from over an ounce to several pounds) and are hard to carry.

The currency of knuts, sickles and galleons in the Harry Potter books is also a parody of the £sd system, with 29 knuts to a sickle and 17 sickles to a galleon. It serves as the currency of the Wizarding World, while pounds are still used by Muggles, the non-magical peop

The currency of knuts, sickles and galleons in the Harry Potter books is also a parody of the £sd system, with 29 knuts to a sickle and 17 sickles to a galleon. It serves as the currency of the Wizarding World, while pounds are still used by Muggles, the non-magical people.[22][23]

Lysergic acid diethylamide was sometimes called "pounds, shillings and pence" during the 1960s, because of the abbreviation LSD.[24] The English rock group the Pretty Things released a 1966 single titled "£.s.d." that highlighted the double entendre.[25] The Chemical Defence Experimental Establishment called the first field trial with LSD as a chemical weapon "Moneybags" as a pun.[26]

The score of 26 at darts (one dart in each of the top three spaces) was sometimes called "half-a-crown" as late as the 1990s, though this did start to confuse the younger players. 26 is also referred to as "Breakfast", since 2/6 or half a crown was the standard cost for breakfast pre-decimalisation.