Subordinate Officer
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Subordinate Officer
Subordinate officer is a term used in some armed forces for a grade of officer above a non-commissioned officer A non-commissioned officer (NCO) is a military officer who has not pursued a commission. Non-commissioned officers usually earn their position of authority by promotion through the enlisted ranks. (Non-officers, which includes most or all enli ... but still not actually commissioned, usually still in training. Such officers are treated for most intents and purposes as commissioned officers. Canada In the Canadian Forces, subordinate officers (french: officiers subordonnés) as a group consist of the Army and Air Force ranks of Officer Cadet (OCdt) and the Navy's Naval Cadet (NCdt); the French language equivalents are ''Élève-officier (élof)'' and ''Aspirant de marine (aspm)'', respectively. The subordinate officer's rank insignia is a single narrow strip of gold braid worn on the cuff of the Service Dress jacket, or on slip-ons on the shoulders of other uniforms. ...
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Armed Forces
A military, also known collectively as armed forces, is a heavily armed, highly organized force primarily intended for warfare. It is typically authorized and maintained by a sovereign state, with its members identifiable by their distinct military uniform. It may consist of one or more military branches such as an army, navy, air force, space force, marines, or coast guard. The main task of the military is usually defined as defence of the state and its interests against external armed threats. In broad usage, the terms ''armed forces'' and ''military'' are often treated as synonymous, although in technical usage a distinction is sometimes made in which a country's armed forces may include both its military and other paramilitary forces. There are various forms of irregular military forces, not belonging to a recognized state; though they share many attributes with regular military forces, they are less often referred to as simply ''military''. A nation's military ...
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Midshipman
A midshipman is an officer of the lowest rank, in the Royal Navy, United States Navy, and many Commonwealth navies. Commonwealth countries which use the rank include Canada (Naval Cadet), Australia, Bangladesh, Namibia, New Zealand, South Africa, India, Pakistan, Singapore, Sri Lanka, and Kenya. In the 17th century, a midshipman was a rating for an experienced seaman, and the word derives from the area aboard a ship, amidships, either where he worked on the ship, or where he was berthed. Beginning in the 18th century, a commissioned officer candidate was rated as a midshipman, and the seaman rating began to slowly die out. By the Napoleonic era (1793–1815), a midshipman was an apprentice officer who had previously served at least three years as a volunteer, officer's servant or able seaman, and was roughly equivalent to a present-day petty officer in rank and responsibilities. After serving at least three years as a midshipman or master's mate, he was eligible to take th ...
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Warrant Officer (United States)
In the United States Armed Forces, the ranks of warrant officer ( grades W‑1 to W‑5; see '' NATO: WO1–WO5'') are rated as officers above all non-commissioned officers, candidates, cadets, and midshipmen, but subordinate to the lowest officer grade of O‑1 (NATO: OF‑1). This application differs from the Commonwealth of Nations and other militaries, where warrant officers are the most senior of the other ranks (NATO: OR‑8 and OR‑9), equivalent to the U.S. Armed Forces grades of E‑8 and E‑9. Warrant officers are highly skilled, single-track specialty officers. While the ranks are authorized by Congress, each branch of the uniformed services selects, manages, and uses warrant officers in slightly different ways. For appointment to the rank of warrant officer one (W‑1), normally a warrant is approved by the secretary of the respective service. However, appointment to this rank can come via commission by the service secretary, the department secretary, or by th ...
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Comparative Military Ranks
This article is a list of various nations' armed forces ranking designations. Comparisons are made between the different systems used by nations to categorize the hierarchy of an armed force compared to another. Several of these lists mention '' NATO reference codes''. These are the NATO rank reference codes, used for easy comparison among NATO countries. Links to comparison charts can be found below. References to modern military Albania *Military ranks of Albania Algeria * Algeria military ranks Angola * Military ranks of Angola Argentina * Military ranks of Argentina * Argentine Army officer rank insignia; Argentine Army enlisted rank insignia Australia * Australian Defence Force ranks * Royal Australian Navy ranks and uniforms * Australian Army officer rank insignia; Australian Army other ranks insignia *Ranks of the RAAF Austria *Ranks of the Austrian Bundesheer Bahrain * Military ranks of Bahrain Bangladesh * Ranks of Bangladesh Army *Ranks and insignia of Bangla ...
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Prison Officer
A prison officer or corrections officer is a uniformed law enforcement official responsible for the custody, supervision, safety, and regulation of prisoners. They are responsible for the care, custody, and control of individuals who have been convicted of a crime and sentenced to imprisonment. They are also responsible for the security of the facility and its property as well as other law enforcement functions. Most prison officers or corrections officers are employed by the government of the jurisdiction in which they operate, although some are employed by private companies that provide prison services to the government. Terms for the role Historically, terms such as " jailer" (also spelled "gaoler"), "guard" and "warder" have all been used. The term "prison officer" is now used for the role in the UK and Ireland. It is the official English title in Denmark, Finland, and Sweden. The term "corrections officer" or "correction officer" is used in the U.S. and New Zealand. ...
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HM Prison Service
His Majesty's Prison Service (HMPS) is a part of HM Prison and Probation Service (formerly the National Offender Management Service), which is the part of His Majesty's Government charged with managing most of the prisons within England and Wales ( Scotland and Northern Ireland have their own prison services: the Scottish Prison Service and the Northern Ireland Prison Service, respectively). The Director General of HMPS, currently Phil Copple, is the administrator of the prison service. The Director General reports to the Secretary of State for Justice and also works closely with the Prisons Minister, a junior ministerial post within the Ministry of Justice. The statement of purpose for His Majesty's Prison Service states that " isMajesty's Prison Service serves the public by keeping in custody those committed by the courts. Our duty is to look after them with humanity and help them lead law abiding and useful lives in custody and after release". The Ministry of Justice's o ...
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Admiralty Yard Craft Service
The Admiralty Yard Craft Service was the civilian service which operated auxiliary vessels for the British Admiralty, mainly in HM Dockyards or the vicinity. It was renamed the Port Auxiliary Service (PAS) on 1 October 1958 and the Royal Maritime Auxiliary Service in 1976 The service operated tugs, harbour ferries, launches, and lighters. Although some of its tugs were classified as ocean-going, it did not operate ocean-going supply vessels, which were the responsibility of the Royal Fleet Auxiliary. The Yard Craft Service crews answered to the Captain's Department in each dockyard. The Fleet Coaling Service and the Admiralty Dredging Service were separate, but closely related, services. Ratings and engineers often transferred freely between vessels of the three services, although masters and mates had to be rated individually on each of the three types of vessel. The Fleet Coaling Service, renamed the Fleet Fuelling Service sometime between 1914 and 1926, operated harbour and ...
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Cap Badge
A cap badge, also known as head badge or hat badge, is a badge worn on uniform headgear and distinguishes the wearer's nationality and/or organisation. The wearing of cap badges is a convention commonly found among military and police forces, as well as uniformed civilian groups such as the Boy Scouts, civil defence organisations, ambulance services (e.g. the St. John Ambulance Brigade), customs services, fire services etc. Cap badges are a modern form of heraldry and their design generally incorporates highly symbolic devices. Some badges that contain images of Lions or other cats are sometimes informally referred to as Cat Badges. Instances in military forces British armed forces The British Armed Forces utilise a variety of metal and cloth cap badges on their headdress, generally on caps and berets. They are also worn on Sikh turbans. British Army In the British Army (as well as other Commonwealth armies) each regiment and corps has its own cap badge. The cap badge ...
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Queen's Regulations For The Royal Navy
The ''King's Regulations'' (first published in 1731 and known as the ''Queen's Regulations'' when the monarch is female) is a collection of orders and regulations in force in the Royal Navy, British Army, Royal Air Force, and Commonwealth Realm Forces (where the same person as on the British throne is also their separate head of state), forming guidance for officers of these armed services in all matters of discipline and personal conduct. Originally, a single set of regulations were published in one volume. By the mid 19th century, there were separate editions of the ''Queen's Regulations'' for the Navy and the Army, and there is now one for each of the United Kingdom's armed forces. History The first issue of what became the ''Queen's Regulations and Admiralty Instructions'' was issued in 1731 as the ''Regulations and Instructions Relating to His Majesty's Service at Sea''. Numerous further editions have appeared since then, and from the 19th century the title was altered to th ...
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Naval Discipline Act 1957
The Naval Discipline Act 1957 was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom governing discipline in the Royal Navy. It governed courts-martial and criminal penalties for crimes committed by officers and ratings of the Royal Navy. It was substantially replaced at the end of 2008 by the Armed Forces Act 2006, which created a unified code of military law for all three British Armed Forces. The whole Naval Discipline Act was repealed in October 2009. Amendments The Armed Forces Act 1981 amended certain aspects of the Act; most notably, it abolished the death penalty for the crime of espionage for the enemy on ships or in naval establishments. The Human Rights Act 1998 abolished the death penalty for all other capital crimes under the Act. In 2004, courts martial in the Royal Navy were reformed by an order issued by the parliamentary Joint Committee on Human Rights. The Committee found that the appointment of serving naval officers as Judge Advocates, and their appointment by ...
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