Kabuki
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Kabuki
is a classical form of Japanese dance-drama. Kabuki theatre is known for its heavily-stylised performances, the often-glamorous costumes worn by performers, and for the elaborate make-up worn by some of its performers. Kabuki is thought to have originated in the very early Edo period, when founder Izumo no Okuni formed a female dance troupe who performed dances and light sketches in Kyoto. The art form had later developed into its present all-male theatrical form after women were banned from performing in kabuki theatre in 1629. Kabuki developed throughout the late 17th century and had reached its zenith in the mid-18th century. In 2005, kabuki theatre was proclaimed by UNESCO as an intangible heritage possessing outstanding universal value. In 2008, it was inscribed in the UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage Lists, UNESCO Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity. Etymology The individual kanji that make up the word 'kabuki' can be read as , , a ...
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Okuni Kabuki Byobu-zu Cropped And Enhanced
was a Japan, Japanese miko, shrine maiden who is believed to have invented the theatrical art form of kabuki. She is thought to have begun performing her new art style of (lit., "the art of singing and dancing") theatre in the dry stream bed, riverbed of the Kamo River in Kyoto. Okuni's troupe quickly gained immense popularity, and were known for their performers, who were often lower-class women Okuni had recruited to act in her all-female theatre group. Few concrete details are known about her life; born near Izumo Province, Okuni worked as a (shrine maiden) for several years at the Izumo-taisha (the Grand Shrine of Izumo) until gaining popularity for her dramatised dance performances, which onlookers gave the name of . Okuni continued to perform kabuki with her troupe until her retirement and disappearance sometime around 1610. She is believed to have died sometime around 1613. History Early years Born , Okuni grew up in the vicinity of the Izumo shrine, where her father, ...
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Izumo No Okuni
was a Japanese Japanese may refer to: * Something from or related to Japan , image_flag = Flag of Japan.svg , alt_flag = Centered deep red circle on a white rectangle , image_coat = Imperial Seal of J ... shrine maiden In Shinto, a is a Shinto shrine, shrine maidenGroemer, 28. or a supplementary priestess. were once likely seen as Shamanism, shamansPicken, 140. but are understood in modern Japanese culture to be an institutionalized role in daily shrine life, ... who is believed to have invented the theatrical art form of kabuki is a classical form of Japanese dance-drama. Kabuki theatre is known for its heavily-stylised performances, the often-glamorous costumes worn by performers, and for the elaborate make-up worn by some of its performers. Kabuki is thought to .... She is thought to have begun performing her new art style of (lit., "the art of singing and dancing") theatre in the dry riverbed of ...
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Kabukimono
or were of in . First appearing in the period (between the end of the period in 1573 and the beginning of the in 1603) as the turbulent period drew to a close, were either , wandering samurai, or men who had once worked for samurai families - who, during times of peace, formed street gangs. Some, however, were also members of more prominent clans — most notably and . The term is often translated into English as "strange things" or "the crazy ones", believed to be derived from , meaning "to slant" or "to deviate"; the term is also the origin of the name for theatre, as kabuki's founder, , took heavy inspiration from the ."Kabuki" in Frederic, Louis (2002). ''Japan Encyclopedia''. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press. would often dress in flamboyant clothing, combining bold colours such as yellow and blue, often accessorised by wearing jackets with lead weights in the hem, velvet lapels, wide belts and even . Exoticism was characteristic and inclu ...
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Nagauta
is a kind of traditional Japanese music The music of Japan includes a wide array of performers in distinct styles, both traditional and modern. The word for "music" in Japanese is 音楽 (''ongaku''), combining the kanji 音 ''on'' (sound) with the kanji 楽 ''gaku'' (enjoy). Japan ... played on the and used in kabuki is a classical form of Japanese dance-drama. Kabuki theatre is known for its heavily-stylised performances, the often-glamorous costumes worn by performers, and for the elaborate make-up worn by some of its performers. Kabuki is thought to ... theater, primarily to accompany dance and to provide reflective interludes. History It is uncertain when the was first integrated into kabuki, but it was sometime during the 17th century; Malm argues that it was probably before 1650. The first reference to as music appears in the second volume of (1703). However, there is no musical notation in this collection, meaning that it is only possible to make ...
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Kumadori
300px, The hero of wearing makeup. Print by is the stage makeup worn by kabuki is a classical form of Japanese dance-drama. Kabuki theatre is known for its heavily-stylised performances, the often-glamorous costumes worn by performers, and for the elaborate make-up worn by some of its performers. Kabuki is thought to h ... actors, mostly when performing kabuki plays in the style. The term also applies to a painting method in which two brushes are used simultaneously, one for the color and the other used to create shading or other details. makeup generally consists of brightly coloured stripes or patterns over a white foundation, the colours and patterns symbolising aspects of the character. Though was originated and developed extensively by members of the family of actors, some conventions are creations of the line. Colours Only a few colours are used in makeup; red, blue, brown and black. Whilst black is simply used to exaggerate features, such as eyebrow ...
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Edo Period
The or is the period between 1603 and 1867 in the of , when Japan was under the rule of the and the country's 300 regional '. Emerging from the chaos of the , the Edo period was characterized by economic growth, strict social order, foreign policies, a stable population, perpetual peace, and popular enjoyment of and . The shogunate was officially established in (now Tokyo) on March 24, 1603, by . The period came to an end with the on May 3, 1868, after the . Consolidation of the shogunate A took place from the time of the , which existed with the 's court, to the , when the ' became the unchallenged rulers in what historian called a "centralized " form of shogunate. Instrumental in the rise of the new was , the main beneficiary of the achievements of and . Already a powerful ' (feudal lord), Ieyasu profited by his transfer to the rich area. He maintained two million ' of land, a new headquarters at , a strategically situated castle town (the future ), and also ha ...
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Shamisen
The , also known as the or (all meaning "three strings"), is a three-stringed traditional Japanese musical instrument derived from the Chinese instrument . It is played with a plectrum Image:Guitar picks DSC06879.jpg, thumbnail, Three plectra for use with guitar A plectrum is a small flat tool used to pluck or strum a string instrument, stringed instrument. For hand-held instruments such as guitars and mandolins, the plectrum is ... called a bachi ''Bachi'' (wiktionary:桴, 桴, wiktionary:枹, 枹) (also ''batchi'') are straight, wooden sticks used on Japanese taiko drums, and also (written 撥) the plectrum for stringed instruments of Japanese origin such as the ''shamisen'' and ''biwa'' .... The Japanese pronunciation is usually but sometimes when used as a suffix, according to regular rendaku, sound change (e.g. ). In Western Japanese dialects and several Edo period sources, it is both written and pronounced as . The construction of the varies in shape, depen ...
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