Bulb Of The Corpus Cavernosum Penis
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Bulb Of The Corpus Cavernosum Penis
Just before each crus of the penis meets its fellow, it presents a slight enlargement, which Georg Ludwig Kobelt named the bulb of the corpus cavernosum penis. The bulb of penis is also known as the urethral bulb. The bulb is homologous to the vestibular bulbs In female anatomy, the vestibular bulbs, bulbs of the vestibule or clitoral bulbs are two elongated masses of erectile tissue typically described as being situated on either side of the vaginal opening. They are united to each other in front by a ... in females. Additional images File:Gray1142.png, Male urethra. File:Gray1158.png, Diagram of the arteries of the penis. References External links * * Mammal male reproductive system Human penis anatomy {{genitourinary-stub ...
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Artery Of Bulb Of Penis
The artery of bulb of penis (artery of the urethral bulb or bulbourethral artery) is a short artery of large caliber which arises from the internal pudendal artery between the two layers of fascia (the superior and inferior) of the urogenital diaphragm Older texts have asserted the existence of a urogenital diaphragm, also called the triangular ligament, which was described as a layer of the pelvis that separates the deep perineal sac from the upper pelvis, lying between the inferior fascia of .... It passes medialward, pierces the inferior fascia of the urogenital diaphragm and gives off branches which ramify in the bulb of the urethra and in the posterior part of the corpus spongiosum. Additional images Image:Penvein.png, Arteries and veins of the penis (Spanish) Image:Gray588.png, The penis in transverse section, showing the bloodvessels. References External links * * Arteries of the abdomen Human penis anatomy {{circulatory-stub ...
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Vein Of Bulb Of Penis
Veins are blood vessels in humans and most other animals that carry blood towards the heart. Most veins carry deoxygenated blood from the tissues back to the heart; exceptions are the pulmonary and umbilical veins, both of which carry oxygenated blood to the heart. In contrast to veins, arteries carry blood away from the heart. Veins are less muscular than arteries and are often closer to the skin. There are valves (called ''pocket valves'') in most veins to prevent backflow. Structure Veins are present throughout the body as tubes that carry blood back to the heart. Veins are classified in a number of ways, including superficial vs. deep, pulmonary vs. systemic, and large vs. small. *Superficial veins are those closer to the surface of the body, and have no corresponding arteries. *Deep veins are deeper in the body and have corresponding arteries. *Perforator veins drain from the superficial to the deep veins. These are usually referred to in the lower limbs and feet. *Communi ...
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Superficial Inguinal Lymph Nodes
Inguinal lymph nodes are lymph nodes in the human groin. Located in the femoral triangle of the inguinal region, they are grouped into superficial and deep lymph nodes. The superficial have three divisions: the superomedial, superolateral, and inferior superficial. Superficial inguinal lymph nodes * The superficial inguinal lymph nodes are the inguinal lymph nodes that form a chain immediately below the inguinal ligament. They lie deep to the fascia of Camper that overlies the femoral vessels at the medial aspect of the thigh. They are bounded superiorly by the inguinal ligament in the femoral triangle; laterally by the border of the sartorius muscle, and medially by the adductor longus muscle. They are divided into three groups: * inferior – inferior of the saphenous opening of the leg, receive drainage from lower legs * superolateral – on the side of the saphenous opening, receive drainage from the side buttocks and the lower abdominal wall. * superomedial – located at t ...
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Crus Of Penis
For their anterior three-fourths the corpora cavernosa penis lie in intimate apposition with one another, but behind they diverge in the form of two tapering processes, known as the crura, which are firmly connected to the ischial rami. Traced from behind forward, each crus begins by a blunt-pointed process in front of the tuberosity of the ischium, along the perineal surface of the conjoined (ischiopubic) ramus. Just before it meets its fellow it presents a slight enlargement, named by Georg Ludwig Kobelt (1804–1857) the bulb of the corpus cavernosum penis Just before each crus of the penis meets its fellow, it presents a slight enlargement, which Georg Ludwig Kobelt Georg Ludwig Kobelt (March 12, 1804 in Kehl – May 18, 1857) was a German anatomist. He studied medicine at the University .... Beyond this point the crus undergoes a constriction and merges into the corpus cavernosum proper, which retains a uniform diameter to its anterior end. Additional images ...
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Penis
A penis (plural ''penises'' or ''penes'' () is the primary sexual organ that male animals use to inseminate females (or hermaphrodites) during copulation. Such organs occur in many animals, both vertebrate and invertebrate, but males do not bear a penis in every animal species, and in those species in which the male does bear a so-called penis, the penises in the various species are not necessarily homologous. The term ''penis'' applies to many intromittent organs, but not to all. As an example, the intromittent organ of most cephalopoda is the hectocotylus, a specialized arm, and male spiders use their pedipalps. Even within the Vertebrata there are morphological variants with specific terminology, such as hemipenes. In most species of animals in which there is an organ that might reasonably be described as a penis, it has no major function other than intromission, or at least conveying the sperm to the female, but in the placental mammals the penis bears the distal part ...
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Georg Ludwig Kobelt
Georg Ludwig Kobelt (March 12, 1804 in Kehl – May 18, 1857) was a German anatomist. He studied medicine at the University of Heidelberg, where he was a student of Friedrich Tiedemann (1781–1861). He received his medical doctorate in 1833, later working as a prosector at Heidelberg. From 1841 he was a prosector at the University of Freiburg, subsequently becoming an associate professor (1844), followed by a full professorship in anatomy a few years later (1847). Kobelt is remembered for his studies in sexual anatomy. In 1844, he published the influential ''Die männlichen und weiblichen Wollust-Organe des Menschen und einiger Säugetiere'' ("The Male and Female Organs of Sexual Arousal in Man and some other Mammals"). Kobelt is credited for providing a comprehensive and accurate description of the function of the clitoris. * ] The eponymous "Kobelt's tubules" are named after him, which are remnants of mesonephric ducts in the paroophoron. These remnants are sometimes refer ...
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Homology (biology)
In biology, homology is similarity due to shared ancestry between a pair of structures or genes in different taxa. A common example of homologous structures is the forelimbs of vertebrates, where the wings of bats and birds, the arms of primates, the front flippers of whales and the forelegs of four-legged vertebrates like dogs and crocodiles are all derived from the same ancestral tetrapod structure. Evolutionary biology explains homologous structures adapted to different purposes as the result of descent with modification from a common ancestor. The term was first applied to biology in a non-evolutionary context by the anatomist Richard Owen in 1843. Homology was later explained by Charles Darwin's theory of evolution in 1859, but had been observed before this, from Aristotle onwards, and it was explicitly analysed by Pierre Belon in 1555. In developmental biology, organs that developed in the embryo in the same manner and from similar origins, such as from matching pri ...
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Vestibular Bulbs
In female anatomy, the vestibular bulbs, bulbs of the vestibule or clitoral bulbs are two elongated masses of erectile tissue typically described as being situated on either side of the vaginal opening. They are united to each other in front by a narrow median band. Some research indicates that they do not surround the vaginal opening, and are more closely related to the clitoris than to the vestibule. Structure Research indicates that the vestibular bulbs are more closely related to the clitoris than to the vestibule because of the similarity of the trabecular and erectile tissue within the clitoris and bulbs, and the absence of trabecular tissue in other genital organs, with the erectile tissue's trabecular nature allowing engorgement and expansion during sexual arousal. Ginger et al. state that although a number of texts report that they surround the vaginal opening, this does not appear to be the case and tunica albuginea does not envelop the erectile tissue of the bulb. The ...
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Mammal Male Reproductive System
Most mammals are viviparous, giving birth to live young. However, the five species of monotreme, the platypuses and the echidnas, lay eggs. The monotremes have a sex determination system different from that of most other mammals. In particular, the sex chromosomes of a platypus are more like those of a chicken than those of a therian mammal. The mammary glands of mammals are specialized to produce milk, a liquid used by newborns as their primary source of nutrition. The monotremes branched early from other mammals and do not have the teats seen in most mammals, but they do have mammary glands. The young lick the milk from a mammary patch on the mother's belly. Viviparous mammals are in the subclass Theria; those living today are in the Marsupialia and Placentalia infraclasses. A marsupial has a short gestation period, typically shorter than its estrous cycle, and gives birth to an underdeveloped (altricial) newborn that then undergoes further development; in many species, this ta ...
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