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Ye Olde
The first Philadelphia Mint, as it appeared around 1908 "Ye olde" is a pseudo–Early Modern English phrase originally used to suggest a connection between a place or business and Merry England (or the medieval period). The term dates to the 1850s or earlier; it continues to be used today, albeit now more frequently in an ironically anachronistic fashion. History Use of "ye olde" dates at least to the late 18th century. The use of the term "ye" to mean "the" derives from Early Modern English, in which ''the'' was written ''þe'', employing the Old English letter thorn, ''þ''. During the Tudor period, the scribal abbreviation for ''þe'' was ("þͤ" or "þᵉ" with modern symbols); here, the letter is combined with the letter .''Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary''.html" style="text-decoration: none;"class="mw-redirect" title="">ye[2/nowiki>">">ye[2/nowiki>retrieved February 1, 2009 Because and look nearly identical in medieval English [[blackletter (as the in , compared with t ...
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Ye Olde Pizza Parlor
Ye or YE may refer to: Language * Ye (pronoun), a form of the second-person plural, personal pronoun "you" * A pseudo-archaic spelling of the English definite article (''the''). See ''Ye Olde'', and the "Ye form" section of English articles * Ye (Cyrillic) (Е), a Cyrillic letter * Ukrainian Ye (Є), a Cyrillic letter * A shortened slang form for "yes" Names and people * Ye (surname) (叶/葉), a Chinese surname * Ye the Great (), a figure in Chinese mythology * Kanye West, American rapper Places * Ye (Hebei), a city in ancient China * Ye County, Henan, China * Laizhou, formerly Ye County, Shandong * Yé, Lanzarote, a village on the island of Lanzarote, Spain * Ye, Mon State, a small town located on the southern coast of Burma * Ye River, a river in Burma * Ye (Korea), an ancient Korean kingdom * Yemen (ISO 3166-1 code YE) Other uses * .ye, the country code top-level domain for Yemen * "Year end", in accounting, particularly in FYE (fiscal year end) * ''Ye'' (album), a 2018 album ...
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Ye Olde Mint,1792
Ye or YE may refer to: Language * Ye (pronoun), a form of the second-person plural, personal pronoun "you" * A pseudo-archaic spelling of the English definite article (''the''). See ''Ye Olde'', and the "Ye form" section of English articles * Ye (Cyrillic) (Е), a Cyrillic letter * Ukrainian Ye (Є), a Cyrillic letter * A shortened slang form for "yes" Names and people * Ye (surname) (叶/葉), a Chinese surname * Ye the Great (), a figure in Chinese mythology * Kanye West, American rapper Places * Ye (Hebei), a city in ancient China * Ye County, Henan, China * Laizhou, formerly Ye County, Shandong * Yé, Lanzarote, a village on the island of Lanzarote, Spain * Ye, Mon State, a small town located on the southern coast of Burma * Ye River, a river in Burma * Ye (Korea), an ancient Korean kingdom * Yemen (ISO 3166-1 code YE) Other uses * .ye, the country code top-level domain for Yemen * "Year end", in accounting, particularly in FYE (fiscal year end) * ''Ye'' (album), a 2018 album ...
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Early Modern English
Early Modern English or Early New English (sometimes abbreviated EModE, EMnE, or EME) is the stage of the English language from the beginning of the Tudor period to the English Interregnum and Restoration, or from the transition from Middle English, in the late 15th century, to the transition to Modern English, in the mid-to-late 17th century. Before and after the accession of James I to the English throne in 1603, the emerging English standard began to influence the spoken and written Middle Scots of Scotland. The grammatical and orthographical conventions of literary English in the late 16th century and the 17th century are still very influential on modern Standard English. Most modern readers of English can understand texts written in the late phase of Early Modern English, such as the King James Bible and the works of William Shakespeare, and they have greatly influenced Modern English. Texts from the earlier phase of Early Modern English, such as the late-15th century ''Le ...
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Merry England
illustrator Richard Doyle. Traditional English fairytales depicting elves, fairies and pixies are set on a "Merrie England" setting of woodland and cottage gardens. "Merry England", or in more jocular, archaic spelling "Merrie England" (also styled as "Merrie Olde Englande"), refers to an England|English autostereotype, a utopian conception of English society and culture based on an idyllic pastoral way of life that was allegedly prevalent in Early Modern Britain at some time between the Middle Ages and the onset of the Industrial Revolution. More broadly, it connotes a putative essential Englishness with nostalgic overtones, incorporating such cultural symbols as the thatched cottage, the country inn and the Sunday roast. "Merry England" is not a wholly consistent vision but rather a revisited England which Oxford folklorist Roy Judge described as "a world that has never actually existed, a visionary, mythical landscape, where it is difficult to take normal historical bearings. ...
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Medieval Period
In the history of Europe, the Middle Ages or medieval period lasted from the 5th to the late 15th century. It began with the fall of the Western Roman Empire and transitioned into the Renaissance and the Age of Discovery. The Middle Ages is the middle period of the three traditional divisions of Western history: classical antiquity, the medieval period, and the modern period. The medieval period is itself subdivided into the Early, High, and Late Middle Ages. Population decline, counterurbanisation, the collapse of centralized authority, invasions, and mass migrations of tribes, which had begun in Late Antiquity, continued in the Early Middle Ages. The large-scale movements of the Migration Period, including various Germanic peoples, formed new kingdoms in what remained of the Western Roman Empire. In the 7th century, North Africa and the Middle East—once part of the Byzantine Empire—came under the rule of the Umayyad Caliphate, an Islamic empire, after conquest by Muha ...
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Anachronistic
An anachronism (from the Greek , 'against' and , 'time') is a chronological inconsistency in some arrangement, especially a juxtaposition of persons, events, objects, language terms and customs from different time periods. The most common type of anachronism is an object misplaced in time, but it may be a verbal expression, a technology, a philosophical idea, a musical style, a material, a plant or animal, a custom, or anything else associated with a particular period that is placed outside its proper temporal domain. An anachronism may be either intentional or unintentional. Intentional anachronisms may be introduced into a literary or artistic work to help a contemporary audience engage more readily with a historical period. Anachronism can also be used (intentionally) for purposes of rhetoric, propaganda, comedy, or shock. Unintentional anachronisms may occur when a writer, artist, or performer is unaware of differences in technology, terminology and language, customs and att ...
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Thorn (letter)
Thorn or þorn (Þ, þ) is a letter in the Old English, Gothic, Old Norse, Old Swedish, and modern Icelandic alphabets, as well as some dialects of Middle English. It was also used in medieval Scandinavia, but was later replaced with the digraph ''th,'' except in Iceland, where it survives. The letter originated from the rune in the Elder Fuþark and was called ''thorn'' in the Anglo-Saxon and ''thorn'' or ''thurs'' in the Scandinavian rune poems. It is similar in appearance to the archaic Greek letter sho (ϸ), although the two are historically unrelated. It is pronounced as either a voiceless dental fricative or the voiced counterpart of it . However, in modern Icelandic, it is pronounced as a laminal voiceless alveolar non-sibilant fricative ,, cited in similar to ''th'' as in the English word ''thick'', or a (usually apical) voiced alveolar non-sibilant fricative , similar to ''th'' as in the English word ''the''. Modern Icelandic usage generally excludes the latter, which ...
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Tudor Dynasty
The House of Tudor was an English royal house of Welsh origin, descended from the Tudors of Penmynydd. Tudor monarchs ruled the Kingdom of England and its realms, including their ancestral Wales and the Lordship of Ireland (later the Kingdom of Ireland) from 1485 until 1603, with six monarchs in that period: Henry VII, Henry VIII, Edward VI, Lady Jane Grey, Mary I and Elizabeth I. The Tudors succeeded the House of Plantagenet as rulers of the Kingdom of England, and were succeeded by the House of Stuart. The first Tudor monarch, Henry VII of England, descended through his mother from a legitimised branch of the English royal House of Lancaster, a cadet house of the Plantagenets. The Tudor family rose to power in the wake of the Wars of the Roses (1455–1487), which left the Tudor-aligned House of Lancaster extinct in the male line. Henry VII succeeded in presenting himself as a candidate not only for traditional Lancastrian supporters, but also for discontented supporters of the ...
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Scribal Abbreviation
Scribal abbreviations or ''sigla'' (singular: ''siglum'') are the abbreviations used by ancient and medieval scribes writing in various languages, including Latin, Greek, Old English and Old Norse. In modern manuscript editing (substantive and mechanical) "sigla" are the symbols used to indicate the source manuscript (e.g. variations in text between different such manuscripts) and to identify the copyists of a work. See Critical apparatus. History Abbreviated writing, using ''sigla'', arose partly from the limitations of the workable nature of the materials (stone, metal, parchment, etc.) employed in record-making and partly from their availability. Thus, lapidaries, engravers, and copyists made the most of the available writing space. Scribal abbreviations were infrequent when writing materials were plentiful, but by the 3rd and 4th centuries AD, writing materials were scarce and costly. During the Roman Republic, several abbreviations, known as ''sigla'' (plural of ''siglum' ...
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EME Ye
EME may refer to: Companies and organizations * Edison Mission Energy, a defunct American power company * Emcor, an American construction company * College of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, a constituent college of National University of Sciences and Technology, Pakistan * Corps of Royal Canadian Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, of the Canadian Forces * Indian Army Corps of EME, of Electronics and Mechanical Engineers * Pakistan Army Corps of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering Science * EME (psychedelic), a drug * Early myoclonic encephalopathy * Earth–Moon–Earth communication * Eigenmode expansion * Electromagnetic environment * Electromembrane extraction * Early Medieval Europe (journal) Other * EME Temple, in Gujarat, India * Encrypted Media Extensions, a W3C specification * Exempted Micro Enterprises {{disambiguation|given name ...
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Combining Character
In digital typography, combining characters are characters that are intended to modify other characters. The most common combining characters in the Latin script are the combining diacritical marks (including combining accents). Unicode also contains many precomposed characters, so that in many cases it is possible to use both combining diacritics and precomposed characters, at the user's or application's choice. This leads to a requirement to perform Unicode normalization before comparing two Unicode strings and to carefully design encoding converters to correctly map all of the valid ways to represent a character in Unicode to a legacy encoding to avoid data loss. In Unicode, the main block of combining diacritics for European languages and the International Phonetic Alphabet is U+0300–U+036F. Combining diacritical marks are also present in many other blocks of Unicode characters. In Unicode, diacritics are always added after the main character (in contrast to some older co ...
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Blackletter
Blackletter (sometimes black letter), also known as Gothic script, Gothic minuscule, or Textura, was a script used throughout Western Europe from approximately 1150 until the 17th century. It continued to be commonly used for the Danish language until 1875, and for German, Estonian and Latvian until the 1940s. Fraktur is a notable script of this type, and sometimes the entire group of blackletter faces is incorrectly referred to as Fraktur. Blackletter is sometimes referred to as Old English, but it is not to be confused with the Old English language (or Anglo-Saxon), which predates blackletter by many centuries and was written in the insular script or in Futhorc. Along with Italic type and Roman type, it served as one of the major typefaces in the history of Western typography. Origins Carolingian minuscule was the direct ancestor of blackletter. Blackletter developed from Carolingian as an increasingly literate 12th-century Europe required new books in many different subjects. ...
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Digraph (orthography)
A digraph or digram (from the el|δίς ', "double" and ', "to write") is a pair of characters used in the orthography of a language to write either a single phoneme (distinct sound), or a sequence of phonemes that does not correspond to the normal values of the two characters combined. Some digraphs represent phonemes that cannot be represented with a single character in the writing system of a language, like the English ''sh'' in ''ship'' and ''fish''. Other digraphs represent phonemes that can also be represented by single characters. A digraph that shares its pronunciation with a single character may be a relic from an earlier period of the language when the digraph had a different pronunciation, or may represent a distinction that is made only in certain dialects, like the English ''wh''. Some such digraphs are used for purely etymological reasons, like ''rh'' in English. Digraphs are used in some Romanization schemes, like the ''zh'' often used to represent the Russian le ...
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Ye (pronoun)
''Ye'' () is a second-person, plural, personal pronoun (nominative), spelled in Old English as "ge". In Middle English and early Early Modern English, it was used as a both informal second-person plural and formal honorific, to address a group of equals or superiors or a single superior. While its use is archaic in most of the English-speaking world, it is used in Newfoundland and Labrador in Canada, and some parts of Ireland to distinguish from the singular "you". Confusion with definite article "Ye" is also sometimes used to represent an Early Modern English form of the definite article "the" (pronounced ), such as in "Ye Olde Shoppe". "The" was often written "EME ye.svg" (here the "e" is written above the other letter to save space but it could also be written on the line). The lower letter is thorn, commonly written þ but which in handwritten scripts could resemble a "y" as shown. Thus the article ''The'' was written ''Þe'' and never ''Ye''. The "thorn" character was suppl ...
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Olde English District
South Carolina was one of the original thirteen states of the United States. European exploration of the area began in April 1540, with the Hernando de Soto expedition, who unwittingly introduced new Eurasian diseases that decimated the local Native American populations, because they lacked immunity. In 1663, the English Crown granted land to eight proprietors of what became the colony. The first settlers came to the Province of Carolina at the port of Charleston in 1670. They were mostly wealthy planters and their slaves coming from the English Caribbean colony of Barbados. They started to develop their commodity crops of sugar and cotton. North Carolina was officially split off into a separate colony in 1712. Pushing back the Native Americans in the Yamasee War (1715–17), colonists next overthrew the proprietors' rule, seeking more direct representation. In 1719, South Carolina was officially made a crown colony. In the Stamp Act Crisis of 1765, South Carolina banded together wit ...
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