The Turl
   HOME
*



picture info

The Turl
Turl Street is a historic street in central Oxford, England. Location The street is located in the city centre, linking Broad Street at the north and High Street at the south. It intersects with Brasenose Lane to the east, and Market Street and Ship Street to the west. These streets link Turl Street to the busy Cornmarket, and to the iconic Radcliffe Square. It is colloquially known as The Turl and is home to three of the University of Oxford's historic colleges: Exeter, Jesus and Lincoln. It meets the High Street by the early 18th century All Saints church, which has been Lincoln College's library since the 1970s. History Turl Street was called St Mildred's Street in 1363, but was known as Turl Gate Street by the mid-17th century. It acquired this name from a twirling gate (demolished in 1722) which was in a postern in the city wall. The part to the south of Ship Street was known as Lincoln College Lane in 1751. Originally the Turl came to an abrupt halt at its junct ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


picture info

Turl Street, Oxford
Turl Street is a historic street in central Oxford, England. Location The street is located in the city centre, linking Broad Street at the north and High Street at the south. It intersects with Brasenose Lane to the east, and Market Street and Ship Street to the west. These streets link Turl Street to the busy Cornmarket, and to the iconic Radcliffe Square. It is colloquially known as The Turl and is home to three of the University of Oxford's historic colleges: Exeter, Jesus and Lincoln. It meets the High Street by the early 18th century All Saints church, which has been Lincoln College's library since the 1970s. History Turl Street was called St Mildred's Street in 1363, but was known as Turl Gate Street by the mid-17th century. It acquired this name from a twirling gate (demolished in 1722) which was in a postern in the city wall. The part to the south of Ship Street was known as Lincoln College Lane in 1751. Originally the Turl came to an abrupt halt at its junct ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


picture info

All Saints Church, Oxford
All Saints Church is a former church on the north side of the High Street in central Oxford, England, on the corner of Turl Street. It is now the library of Lincoln College. This former church is Grade I listed. History The original All Saints Church was founded in 1122 on this site. However, on 8 March 1700, the spire of the church collapsed, destroying most of the building. There was an appeal for funds and the current building, seating 350, was completed in 1720. The building was designed by Henry Aldrich, the Dean of Christ Church. Nicholas Hawksmoor is thought to be responsible for the tower and spire. Four of the original bells survived the collapse. The repairs to the church were very expensive and donations were received from most of the Oxford colleges and also Queen Anne. In 1896, when St Martin's Church at Carfax was demolished (except for its tower), All Saints became the official City Church, where the Mayor and Corporation were expected to worship. In 194 ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


picture info

Trinity College, Oxford
(That which you wish to be secret, tell to nobody) , named_for = The Holy Trinity , established = , sister_college = Churchill College, Cambridge , president = Dame Hilary Boulding , location = Broad Street, Oxford OX1 3BH , coordinates = , location_map = Oxford (central) , undergraduates = 308 (2011/2012) , graduates = 125 , shield = , blazon = ''Per pale or and azure, on a chevron between three griffins' heads erased four fleurs-de-lis all counter-changed'' (arms of Sir Thomas Pope, Founder) , homepage = , boat_club Boat Club Trinity College (full name: The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity in the University of Oxford, of the foundation of Sir Thomas Pope (Knight)) is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England. The college was founded in 1555 by Sir Thomas Pope, on land previously occupied by Durham College, home to Benedictine monks from Durham Cathedral. Despite its large physical size, the college is relatively small ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


picture info

Balliol College
Balliol College () is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England. One of Oxford's oldest colleges, it was founded around 1263 by John I de Balliol, a landowner from Barnard Castle in County Durham, who provided the foundation and endowment for the college. When de Balliol died in 1268, his widow, Dervorguilla, a woman whose wealth far exceeded that of her husband, continued his work in setting up the college, providing a further endowment and writing the statutes. She is considered a co-founder of the college. The college's alumni include four former Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom (H. H. Asquith, Harold Macmillan, Edward Heath, and Boris Johnson), Harald V of Norway, Empress Masako of Japan, five Nobel laureates, several Lords of Appeal in Ordinary, and numerous literary and philosophical figures, including Shoghi Effendi, Adam Smith, Gerard Manley Hopkins, and Aldous Huxley. John Wycliffe, who translated the Bible into English, was mast ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  




Turl Street Arts Festival
The Turl Street Arts Festival (TSAF) is an annual festival held in February, involving students from the three Turl Street Colleges in Oxford, England: Jesus College, Exeter College and Lincoln College. It is one of several arts festivals in Oxford, and has been running since 1997. TSAF is organized by a committee of students from the three colleges. Each year a different College takes lead of the Festival, nominating the Chair of the Festival from within their Junior Common Room (JCR). Originally created by the members of the Colleges including Chris Millington and Caroline Russell with support from the Chaplains of the colleges and the organ scholars, the week varies from more formal events such as choral recitals to open mic nights and several plays. There are also opportunities for photography exhibitions and short film previews. The week traditionally ends with a Sunday Choral Evensong led by the combined choirs of the three colleges. The 2019 festival will run between ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


High Church
The term ''high church'' refers to beliefs and practices of Christian ecclesiology, liturgy, and theology that emphasize formality and resistance to modernisation. Although used in connection with various Christian traditions, the term originated in and has been principally associated with the Anglican tradition, where it describes churches using a number of ritual practices associated in the popular mind with Roman Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy. The opposite tradition is '' low church''. Contemporary media discussing Anglican churches erroneously prefer the terms evangelical to ''low church'' and Anglo-Catholic to ''high church'', even though their meanings do not exactly correspond. Other contemporary denominations that contain high church wings include some Lutheran, Presbyterian, and Methodist churches. Variations Because of its history, the term ''high church'' also refers to aspects of Anglicanism quite distinct from the Oxford Movement or Anglo-Catholicism. There rema ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


picture info

Church Of England
The Church of England (C of E) is the established Christian church in England and the mother church of the international Anglican Communion. It traces its history to the Christian church recorded as existing in the Roman province of Britain by the 3rd century and to the 6th-century Gregorian mission to Kent led by Augustine of Canterbury. The English church renounced papal authority in 1534 when Henry VIII failed to secure a papal annulment of his marriage to Catherine of Aragon. The English Reformation accelerated under Edward VI's regents, before a brief restoration of papal authority under Queen Mary I and King Philip. The Act of Supremacy 1558 renewed the breach, and the Elizabethan Settlement charted a course enabling the English church to describe itself as both Reformed and Catholic. In the earlier phase of the English Reformation there were both Roman Catholic martyrs and radical Protestant martyrs. The later phases saw the Penal Laws punis ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  




Walters Of Oxford
Walters may refer to: Places United States * Walters, Minnesota, a city * Walters, Oklahoma, a city * Walters, Virginia, an unincorporated community Other uses * Walters (surname) * Walters (character), a character on ''Tale Spin'' * The Walters, an alternative rock band from Chicago, Illinois * Walters Art Museum, often referred to as, "The Walters;" a major art museum in Baltimore See also * Walter (other) * Justice Walters (other) * Walter's Hot Dog Stand Walter's Hot Dog Stand is a National Register of Historic Places designated landmark located in Mamaroneck in Westchester County, New York. History Walter's is a family business founded in 1919 by Walter Warrington in Mamaroneck, NY. His first ...
{{disambiguation, geo ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


Ducker & Son
Ducker & Son was a traditional shoe makers in Turl Street in Oxford. The business was founded by Edward Ducker in 1898. A limited company was formed following the deaths of Ducker and his wife in 1947. The shop was featured in the 2007 film Atonement. Ducker & Son closed at the end of November 2016. Its archives are now held in the Bodleian Library. Customers Customers included: * H. H. Asquith - Prime Minister * Rowan Atkinson - English actor and comedian known for ''Mr. Bean'' and ''Blackadder''. * Jeremy Clarkson - English broadcaster and writer known for BBC TV show ''Top Gear''. * David Cornwell - Irish/British author who wrote under the pen name John le Carré. * Matt Flynn - English writer. * Eddie Jordan - Irish businessman and former Formula One team boss. * Lady Ottoline Morrell - Literary salonist * Matthew Pinsent - English Olympic rower and broadcaster. * J.R.R. Tolkien - English writer and Oxford don known for ''The Hobbit'' and ''The Lord of the Rings''. ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


picture info

Oxfam
Oxfam is a British-founded confederation of 21 independent charitable organizations focusing on the alleviation of global poverty, founded in 1942 and led by Oxfam International. History Founded at 17 Broad Street, Oxford, as the Oxford Committee for Famine Relief by a group of Quakers, social activists, and Oxford academics in 1942 and registered in accordance with UK law in 1943, the original committee was a group of concerned citizens, including Henry Gillett (a prominent local Quaker), Theodore Richard Milford, Gilbert Murray and his wife Mary, Cecil Jackson-Cole, and Alan Pim. The committee met in the Old Library of University Church of St Mary the Virgin, Oxford, for the first time in 1942, and its aim was to help starving citizens of occupied Greece, a famine caused by the Axis occupation of Greece and Allied naval blockades and to persuade the British government to allow food relief through the blockade. The Oxford committee was one of several local committees ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]