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Sterlet
The sterlet (''Acipenser ruthenus'') is a relatively small species of sturgeon from Eurasia native to large rivers that flow into the Black Sea, Azov Sea, and Caspian Sea, as well as rivers in Siberia as far east as Yenisei. Populations migrating between fresh and salt water (anadromous) have been extirpated. Due to overfishing (for its flesh, caviar, and isinglass), pollution, and dams, the sterlet has declined throughout its native range and is considered vulnerable by the IUCN. Restocking projects are ongoing, and it has been introduced to some regions outside its native range, but the latter have generally not become self-sustaining. Today, the majority of the international trade involves sterlets from aquaculture. Physical appearance *The sterlet may reach 16 kg in weight and 100 to 125 cm in length, rarely exceeding a length of 90 cm. *It is quite variable in coloration, but usually has a yellowish ventral side. *It is distinguishable from other European sp ...
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Sterlet With Satsivi
The sterlet (''Acipenser ruthenus'') is a relatively small species of sturgeon from Eurasia native to large rivers that flow into the Black Sea, Azov Sea, and Caspian Sea, as well as rivers in Siberia as far east as Yenisei. Populations migrating between fresh and salt water (anadromous) have been extirpated. Due to overfishing (for its flesh, caviar, and isinglass), pollution, and dams, the sterlet has declined throughout its native range and is considered vulnerable by the IUCN. Restocking projects are ongoing, and it has been introduced to some regions outside its native range, but the latter have generally not become self-sustaining. Today, the majority of the international trade involves sterlets from aquaculture. Physical appearance *The sterlet may reach 16 kg in weight and 100 to 125 cm in length, rarely exceeding a length of 90 cm. *It is quite variable in coloration, but usually has a yellowish ventral side. *It is distinguishable from other European sp ...
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Acipenser Ruthenus3
''Acipenser'' is a genus of sturgeons. With 17 living species (others are only known from fossil remains), it is the largest genus in the order Acipenseriformes. They are native to feshwater and estuarine systems of Eurasia and North America, and most species are threatened. Several species also known to enter near-shore marine environments in the Atlantic, Arctic and Pacific oceans. Living species There are 17 living species: *''Acipenser baerii'' J. F. Brandt, 1869 **''Acipenser baerii baerii'' J. F. Brandt, 1869 (Siberian sturgeon) **''Acipenser baerii baicalensis'' A. M. Nikolskii, 1896 (Baikal sturgeon) **''Acipenser baerii stenorrhynchus'' A. M. Nikolskii, 1896 *''Acipenser brevirostrum'' Lesueur, 1818 (Shortnose sturgeon) *''Acipenser dabryanus'' A. H. A. Duméril, 1869 (Yangtze sturgeon) *''Acipenser fulvescens'' Rafinesque, 1817 (Lake sturgeon) *''Acipenser gueldenstaedtii'' J. F. Brandt & Ratzeburg, 1833 (Russian sturgeon) *''Acipenser medirostris'' Ayres, 1854 (Green st ...
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Acipenser Ruthenus Prague Vltava 3
''Acipenser'' is a genus of sturgeons. With 17 living species (others are only known from fossil remains), it is the largest genus in the order Acipenseriformes. They are native to feshwater and estuarine systems of Eurasia and North America, and most species are threatened. Several species also known to enter near-shore marine environments in the Atlantic, Arctic and Pacific oceans. Living species There are 17 living species: *''Acipenser baerii'' J. F. Brandt, 1869 **''Acipenser baerii baerii'' J. F. Brandt, 1869 (Siberian sturgeon) **''Acipenser baerii baicalensis'' A. M. Nikolskii, 1896 (Baikal sturgeon) **''Acipenser baerii stenorrhynchus'' A. M. Nikolskii, 1896 *''Acipenser brevirostrum'' Lesueur, 1818 (Shortnose sturgeon) *''Acipenser dabryanus'' A. H. A. Duméril, 1869 (Yangtze sturgeon) *''Acipenser fulvescens'' Rafinesque, 1817 (Lake sturgeon) *''Acipenser gueldenstaedtii'' J. F. Brandt & Ratzeburg, 1833 (Russian sturgeon) *''Acipenser medirostris'' Ayres, 1854 (Green st ...
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Sturgeon
Sturgeon is the common name for the 27 species of fishes belonging to the family Acipenseridae. The earliest sturgeon fossils date to the Late Cretaceous, and are descended from other, earlier acipenseriform fish who date back to the Triassic period some 245 to 208 million years ago. The family is grouped into four genera: ''Acipenser'', ''Huso'', ''Scaphirhynchus'' and ''Pseudoscaphirhynchus''. Four species may now be extinct. Two closely related species, ''Polyodon spathula'' (American paddlefish) and ''Psephurus gladius'' (Chinese paddlefish, extinct) are of the same order, Acipenseriformes, but are in the family Polyodontidae and are not considered to be "true" sturgeons. Both sturgeons and paddlefish have been referred to as "primitive fishes" because their morphological characteristics have remained relatively unchanged since the earliest fossil record. Sturgeons are native to subtropical, temperate and sub-Arctic rivers, lakes and coastlines of Eurasia and North America. S ...
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Caviar
Caviar (also known as caviare; from fa|خاویار|khâvyâr|egg-bearing) is a food consisting of salt-cured roe of the family Acipenseridae. Caviar is considered a delicacy and is eaten as a garnish or a spread. Traditionally, the term ''caviar'' refers only to roe from wild sturgeon in the Caspian Sea and Black Sea (Beluga, Ossetra and Sevruga caviars). Depending on the country, ''caviar'' may also be used to describe the roe of other species of sturgeon or other fish such as salmon, steelhead, trout, lumpfish, whitefish, or carp. The roe can be "fresh" (non-pasteurized) or pasteurized, with pasteurization reducing its culinary and economic value. Terminology According to the United Nations' Food and Agriculture Organization, roe from any fish not belonging to the Acipenseriformes order (including Acipenseridae, or sturgeon ''sensu stricto'', and Polyodontidae or paddlefish) are not caviar, but "substitutes of caviar." This position is also adopted by the Convention on ...
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Carl Linnaeus
Carl Linnaeus (; 23 May 1707 – 10 January 1778), also known after his ennoblement as Carl von LinnéBlunt (2004), p. 171. (), was a Swedish botanist, zoologist, taxonomist, and physician who formalised binomial nomenclature, the modern system of naming organisms. He is known as the "father of modern taxonomy". Many of his writings were in Latin, and his name is rendered in Latin as (after 1761 Carolus a Linné). Linnaeus was born in Råshult, the countryside of Småland, in southern Sweden. He received most of his higher education at Uppsala University and began giving lectures in botany there in 1730. He lived abroad between 1735 and 1738, where he studied and also published the first edition of his ' in the Netherlands. He then returned to Sweden where he became professor of medicine and botany at Uppsala. In the 1740s, he was sent on several journeys through Sweden to find and classify plants and animals. In the 1750s and 1760s, he continued to collect and classify anim ...
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Aquaculture
Aquaculture (less commonly spelled aquiculture), also known as aquafarming, is the farming of fish, crustaceans, mollusks, aquatic plants, algae, and other organisms. Aquaculture involves cultivating freshwater and saltwater populations under controlled conditions, and can be contrasted with commercial fishing, which is the harvesting of wild fish. Mariculture commonly known as marine farming refers to aquaculture practiced in marine environments and in underwater habitats, opposed to in freshwater. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), aquaculture "is understood to mean the farming of aquatic organisms including fish, molluscs, crustaceans and aquatic plants. Farming implies some form of intervention in the rearing process to enhance production, such as regular stocking, feeding, protection from predators, etc. Farming also implies individual or corporate ownership of the stock being cultivated." The reported output from global aquaculture operations in 201 ...
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Freshwater Fish Of Europe
Fresh water (or freshwater) is any naturally occurring water except seawater and brackish water. Fresh water is generally characterized by having low concentrations of dissolved salts and other total dissolved solids. Though the term specifically excludes seawater and brackish water, it does include mineral-rich waters such as chalybeate springs. Fresh water may include water in ice sheets, ice caps, glaciers, icebergs, bogs, ponds, lakes, rivers, streams, and even underground water called groundwater. Water is critical to the survival of all living organisms. Some organisms can thrive on salt water, but the great majority of higher plants and most mammals need fresh water to live. Fresh water is not always potable water, that is, water safe to drink. Much of the earth's fresh water (on the surface and groundwater) is to a substantial degree unsuitable for human consumption without some treatment. Fresh water can easily become polluted by human activities or due to naturally o ...
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Larva
A larva (plural larvae ) is a distinct juvenile form many animals undergo before metamorphosis into adults. Animals with indirect development such as insects, amphibians, or cnidarians typically have a larval phase of their life cycle. The larva's appearance is generally very different from the adult form (''e.g.'' caterpillars and butterflies) including different unique structures and organs that do not occur in the adult form. Their diet may also be considerably different. Larvae are frequently adapted to environments separate from adults. For example, some larvae such as tadpoles live almost exclusively in aquatic environments, but can live outside water as adult frogs. By living in a distinct environment, larvae may be given shelter from predators and reduce competition for resources with the adult population. Animals in the larval stage will consume food to fuel their transition into the adult form. In some organisms like polychaetes and barnacles, adults are immobile but ...
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Worm
Worms are many different distantly related animals that typically have a long cylindrical tube-like body, no limbs, and no eyes. Worms vary in size from microscopic to over in length for marine polychaete worms (bristle worms), for the African giant earthworm, ''Microchaetus rappi'', and for the marine nemertean worm (bootlace worm), ''Lineus longissimus''. Various types of worm occupy a small variety of parasitic niches, living inside the bodies of other animals. Free-living worm species do not live on land, but instead, live in marine or freshwater environments, or underground by burrowing. In biology, "worm" refers to an obsolete taxon, ''vermes'', used by Carolus Linnaeus and Jean-Baptiste Lamarck for all non-arthropod invertebrate animals, now seen to be paraphyletic. The name stems from the Old English word ''wyrm''. Most animals called "worms" are invertebrates, but the term is also used for the amphibian caecilians and the slowworm ''Anguis'', a legless burrowing liza ...
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Crustaceans
Crustaceans (Crustacea ) form a large, diverse arthropod taxon which includes such animals as crabs, lobsters, crayfish, shrimps, prawns, krill, woodlice, and barnacles. The crustacean group can be treated as a subphylum under the clade Mandibulata; because of recent molecular studies it is now well accepted that the crustacean group is paraphyletic, and comprises all animals in the clade Pancrustacea other than hexapods. Some crustaceans are more closely related to insects and the other hexapods than they are to certain other crustaceans. The 67,000 described species range in size from ''Stygotantulus stocki'' at , to the Japanese spider crab with a leg span of up to and a mass of . Like other arthropods, crustaceans have an exoskeleton, which they moult to grow. They are distinguished from other groups of arthropods, such as insects, myriapods and chelicerates, by the possession of biramous (two-parted) limbs, and by their larval forms, such as the nauplius stage of branchiopod ...
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Benthic
The benthic zone is the ecological region at the lowest level of a body of water such as an ocean, lake, or stream, including the sediment surface and some sub-surface layers. Organisms living in this zone are called benthos and include microorganisms (e.g., bacteria and fungi) as well as larger invertebrates, such as crustaceans and polychaetes. Organisms here generally live in close relationship with the substrate and many are permanently attached to the bottom. The benthic boundary layer, which includes the bottom layer of water and the uppermost layer of sediment directly influenced by the overlying water, is an integral part of the benthic zone, as it greatly influences the biological activity that takes place there. Examples of contact soil layers include sand bottoms, rocky outcrops, coral, and bay mud. Description The benthic region of the ocean begins at the shore line (intertidal or littoral zone) and extends downward along the surface of the continental shelf out to sea. ...
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Barbel (anatomy)
carp have two pairs of barbels, the second pair being quite small. Image:Arowana.jpg">250px|This organ_near_the_[[mouth.html" style="text-decoration: none;"class="mw-redirect" title="Turtle#Anatomy and morphology">turtle anatomy, a barbel is a slender, whiskerlike sensory [[organ (anatomy)">organ near the [[mouth">Turtle#Anatomy and morphology">turtle anatomy, a barbel is a slender, whiskerlike sensory [[organ (anatomy)">organ near the [[mouth. Fish that have barbels include the [[catfish, the [[carp, the [[goatfish, the [[hagfish, the [[sturgeon, the [[zebrafish, the [[Idiacanthus atlanticus|black dragonfish and some species of [[shark such as the [[sawshark. Barbels house the taste buds of such fish and are used to search for food in murky water. The word "barbel" comes from the Middle Latin ''barbula'', for "little beard." Barbels are sometimes erroneously referred to as ''barbs'', which are found in bird feathers for flight. Barbels may be located in a variety of locations on ...
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Scutes
A scute or scutum (Latin ''scutum'', plural: ''scuta'' "shield") is a bony external plate or scale overlaid with horn, as on the shell of a turtle, the skin of crocodilians, and the feet of birds. The term is also used to describe the anterior portion of the mesonotum in insects as well as some arachnids (e.g., the family Ixodidae, the scale ticks). Properties Scutes are similar to scales and serve the same function. Unlike the scales of lizards and snakes, which are formed from the epidermis, scutes are formed in the lower vascular layer of the skin and the epidermal element is only the top surface . Forming in the living dermis, the scutes produce a horny outer layer that is superficially similar to that of scales. Scutes will usually not overlap as snake scales (but see the pangolin). The outer keratin layer is shed piecemeal, and not in one continuous layer of skin as seen in snakes or lizards. The dermal base may contain bone and produce dermal armour. Scutes with a bony base ...
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