Sepak Tekong
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Sepak Tekong
Sepak Tekong is a traditional children's game from Padang, West Sumatra, Indonesia similar in play to hide-and-seek. It is played in many regions around Indonesia. The name comes from the Minangkabau language. The word ''sepak'' means or in Indonesian, which roughly translates to "kick" in English; and ''tekong'' means in Indonesian, which translates to the word "can" in English. Sepak Tekong therefore roughly translates to "kicking the can" in English. How to play Sepak Tekong is a game usually played by children around eight years of age and above. The ideal number of players is between three and ten people and it is normally played in a house or yard that has various places to hide. Players use either a coconut shell or a small milk can filled with sand as the can. It is essential that the can makes a loud sound when kicked. Before the game starts, the first player selects the best place to set the can and chooses the boundaries of where other players can hide. A lottery, ...
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Padang, West Sumatra
Padang () is the Capital city, capital and largest city of the Indonesian Provinces of Indonesia, province of West Sumatra. With a Census population of 909,040 as of 2020, it is the List of cities in Indonesia by population, 16th most populous city in Indonesia and the most populous city on the west coast of Sumatra. The Padang metropolitan area is the List of metropolitan areas in Indonesia, third most populous metropolitan area in Sumatra with a population of over 1.4 million. Padang is widely known for its Minangkabau people, Minangkabau culture, Padang cuisine, cuisine, and sunset beaches. The city had historically been a trading center since the pre-colonial era, trading in Black pepper, pepper and gold. The Dutch made contact with the city in the mid 17th century, eventually constructing a fortress and taking over control of the city from the Pagaruyung Kingdom. Save for several interruptions of British rule, Padang remained part of the Dutch East Indies as one of its maj ...
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Indonesia
Indonesia ( ), officially the Republic of Indonesia ( id, Republik Indonesia, links=yes ), is a country in Southeast Asia Southeast Asia, also spelled South East Asia and South-East Asia, and also known as Southeastern Asia or SEA, is the geographical southeastern subregion of Asia, consisting of the regions that are south of China, south-east of the Indian sub ... and Oceania Oceania (, , ) is a Region, geographic region that includes Australasia, Melanesia, Micronesia and Polynesia. Spanning the eastern hemisphere, Eastern and Western Hemispheres, Oceania has a land area of and a population of over 41 million. Wh ... between the Indian Indian or Indians refers to people or things related to India, or to the indigenous people of the Americas, or Aboriginal Australians until the 19th century. People South Asia * Indian people, people of Indian nationality, or people who come ... and Pacific The Pacific Ocean is the largest and deepest of Earth ...
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Hide-and-seek
Hide-and-seek is a popular children's game This is a list of game with separate sliding drawer, from 1390–1353 BC, made of glazed faience, dimensions: 5.5 × 7.7 × 21 cm, in the Brooklyn Museum (New York City) '', 1560, Pieter Bruegel the Elder File:Paul Cézann ... in which at least two players (usually at least three) conceal themselves in a set environment, to be found by one or more seekers. The game is played by one chosen player (designated as being "it") counting to a predetermined number with eyes closed while the other players hide. After reaching this number, the player who is "it" calls "Ready or not, here I come!" or "Coming, ready or not!" and then attempts to locate all concealed players. The game can end in one of several ways. The most common way of ending is the player chosen as "it" locates all players; the player found first is the loser and is chosen to be "it" in the next game. The player found last is the winner. Another common ...
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Minangkabau Language
Minangkabau (Minangkabau: , Pegon script: بَاسُوْ مِيْنڠكَابَاوْ; id, Bahasa Minangkabau; ms, Bahasa Minangkabau or , Jawi alphabet, Jawi: بَهَاسَ مِينَاڠكَابَاوْ) is an Austronesian languages, Austronesian language spoken by the Minangkabau people, Minangkabau of West Sumatra, the western part of Riau, South Aceh Regency, the northern part of Bengkulu and Jambi, also in several cities throughout Indonesia by migrated Minangkabau.Kajian Serba Linguistik : Untuk Anton Moeliono Pereksa Bahasa (2000) The language is also a lingua franca along the western coastal region of the province of North Sumatra, and is even used in parts of Aceh, where the language is called ''Aneuk Jamee''. Due to the huge proximity between Minangkabau and Malay language, Malay, there is some controversy regarding the relationship between the two. Some see Minangkabau as a nonstandard dialect, local variety of Malay, while others think of Minangkabau as a distinct ...
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Children's Games
This is a list of games that used to be played by children, some of which are still being played today. Traditional children's games do not include commercial products such as board games but do include games which require props such as hopscotch or marbles (toys go in List of toys unless the toys are used in multiple games or the single game played is named after the toy; thus "jump rope" is a game, while "Jacob's ladder (toy), Jacob's ladder" is a toy). Despite being transmitted primarily through word of mouth due to not being considered suitable for academic study or adult attention, traditional games have, "not only failed to disappear but have also evolved over time into new versions." Traditional children's games are defined, "as those that are played informally with minimal equipment, that children learn by example from other children, and that can be played without reference to written rules. These games are usually played by children between the ages of 7 and 12, with some ...
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Street Games
A street game or street sport is a sport or game that is played on city streets rather than a prepared game field, field. Street games are usually simply play time activities for children in the most convenient venue. Some street games have risen to the level of organized tournaments, such as stickball. When street games are based on organized sports, the rules are highly modified to fit the situation, i.e. manhole covers for bases with cars or buildings for foul lines in stickball. When balls are used in street games, Spaldeens are often used. Street sports Street sports are sports held in urban area, urban environments. Street sports are an expression of the spontaneous, improvisational and creative origins of sport adapted by human ingenuity to the urban environment. In historical terms their origins are traceable to the very earliest evidence of sports in Greek and Roman civilisation.''Urbanization and the Evolution of the City; Reader, J.; Vintage; (2005) Street sports ...
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Hide-and-seek Variants
Hide-and-seek is a popular children's game in which at least two players (usually at least three) conceal themselves in a set environment, to be found by one or more seekers. The game is played by one chosen player (designated as being "it") counting to a predetermined number with eyes closed while the other players hide. After reaching this number, the player who is "it" calls "Ready or not, here I come!" or "Coming, ready or not!" and then attempts to locate all concealed players. The game can end in one of several ways. The most common way of ending is the player chosen as "it" locates all players; the player found first is the loser and is chosen to be "it" in the next game. The player found last is the winner. Another common variation has the seeker counting at "home base"; the hiders can either remain hidden or they can come out of hiding to race to home base; once they touch it, they are "safe" and cannot be tagged. In Ohio, hiders must yell "free" when they touch base or ...
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