Sarah Cooper (marmalade Maker)
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Sarah Cooper (marmalade Maker)
Sarah Jane Cooper (1848–1932) was an English marmalade maker and wife of Frank Cooper (1844–1927). Sarah Cooper was born Sarah Jane Gill in Beoley, Worcestershire in 1848. In 1872 she got married in Clifton, Bristol to Frank Cooper of Oxford and they made their home at 31 Kingston Road, Oxford. In 1867 Frank had inherited the family grocery shop at 84 High Street, Oxford. In 1874 Frank expanded the business into 83 High Street next door, and the Coopers gave up their house in Kingston Road to live over the shop. Sarah, then aged 24, made of marmalade to her own recipe. The marmalade became a regular product of Frank Cooper's business, being made behind the shop until 1903 when he moved production to a new purpose-built factory at 27 Park End Street.Woolley, 2010, page 91 Frank Cooper's business was taken over in 1964 and production left Oxford in 1967.Woolley, 2010, page 94 However, its marmalades and jams remain in production as a brand of Premier Foods Premier Foods ...
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Beoley
Beoley is a small village and larger civil parish north of Redditch in the Bromsgrove District of Worcestershire. It adjoins Warwickshire to the east. The 2001 census gave a parish population of 945, mostly at Holt End. The parish includes the hamlet of Portway, adjacent to the A435 road. It adjoins the Redditch suburb of Church Hill and the civil parishes of Alvechurch, Tanworth-in-Arden, Mappleborough Green and Wythall. History Manor The estates of the Benedictine Pershore Abbey included lands at ''Beoleahe'' from the 10th century at the latest, when Edgar the Peaceful restored them to the monks in AD 972. The Domesday Book of 1086 records that the abbey held 21 hides of land at ''Beolege'' and Yardley. An ancient castle, of which very slight traces remain, belonged successively to the noble families of Mortimer, Beauchamp, and Holland. Roger Mortimer (died 1214), Lord of Wigmore first appears in the pipe roll for 1174–1175, when he owned land in Shropshire and Worces ...
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Park End Street
Park End Street is a street in central Oxford, England, to the west of the centre of the city, close to the railway station at its western end. Location To the east, New Road links Park End Street to central Oxford. To the west, Frideswide Square links Park End Street with Botley Road, the main arterial road in and out of Oxford to and from the west. Parallel to the street to the north is Hythe Bridge Street. At the junction with New Road, Worcester Street leads north and Tidmarsh Lane leads south. At the junction with Frideswide Square, Rewley Road leads north and Hollybush Row leads south. History Park End Street was built in 1769–70 as part of New Road, a new turnpike road between central Oxford and the west. It bypassed the earlier and narrower Hythe Bridge Street to the north and St. Thomas's High Street (now St Thomas' Street) to the south. Pacey's Bridge was built to carry the eastern part of Park End Street across Castle Mill Stream, which is part of the Rive ...
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19th-century English Businesswomen
The 19th (nineteenth) century began on 1 January 1801 ( MDCCCI), and ended on 31 December 1900 ( MCM). The 19th century was the ninth century of the 2nd millennium. The 19th century was characterized by vast social upheaval. Slavery was abolished in much of Europe and the Americas. The First Industrial Revolution, though it began in the late 18th century, expanding beyond its British homeland for the first time during this century, particularly remaking the economies and societies of the Low Countries, the Rhineland, Northern Italy, and the Northeastern United States. A few decades later, the Second Industrial Revolution led to ever more massive urbanization and much higher levels of productivity, profit, and prosperity, a pattern that continued into the 20th century. The Islamic gunpowder empires fell into decline and European imperialism brought much of South Asia, Southeast Asia, and almost all of Africa under colonial rule. It was also marked by the collapse of the large ...
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