Russian Karelia
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Russian Karelia
East Karelia ( fi, Itä-Karjala, Karelian language, Karelian: ''Idä-Karjala''), also rendered as Eastern Karelia or Russian Karelia, is a name for the part of Karelia that since the Treaty of Stolbova in 1617 has remained Eastern Orthodox Church, Eastern Orthodox under Russian supremacy. It is separate from the western part of Karelia, called ''Finnish Karelia'' or historically ''Swedish Karelia'' (before 1808). Most of East Karelia has become part of the Republic of Karelia within the Russian Federation. It consists mainly of the old historical regions of Viena, East Karelia, Viena and Olonets, Aunus. Culture and ideology 19th-century ethnic nationalism, ethnic-nationalist Fennomans saw East Karelia as the ancient home of Baltic Finns, Finnic culture, "un-contaminated" by either Scandinavians or Slavic peoples, Slavs. In the sparsely-populated East Karelian backwoods, mainly in White Karelia, Elias Lönnrot (1802–1884) collected the Folklore, folk tales that ultimately would ...
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East And West Karelias
East or Orient is one of the four cardinal directions or points of the compass. It is the opposite direction from west and is the direction from which the Sun rises on the Earth. Etymology As in other languages, the word is formed from the fact that east is the direction where the Sun rises: ''east'' comes from Middle English ''est'', from Old English ''ēast'', which itself comes from the Proto-Germanic *''aus-to-'' or *''austra-'' "east, toward the sunrise", from Proto-Indo-European *aus- "to shine," or "dawn", cognate with Old High German ''*ōstar'' "to the east", Latin ''aurora'' 'dawn', and Greek ''ēōs'' 'dawn, east'. Examples of the same formation in other languages include Latin oriens 'east, sunrise' from orior 'to rise, to originate', Greek ανατολή anatolé 'east' from ἀνατέλλω 'to rise' and Hebrew מִזְרָח mizraḥ 'east' from זָרַח zaraḥ 'to rise, to shine'. '' Ēostre'', a Germanic goddess of dawn, might have been a personification ...
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