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Queen's Lane
Queen's Lane is a historic street in central Oxford, England, named after Queen's College, to the south and west. St Edmund Hall, a constituent college of the University of Oxford, is located on the southern end of this street. Location At the southeastern end of Queen's Lane is a junction onto the High Street. To the west is Queen's College and to the east on the corner is the Queen's Lane Coffee House, a historic coffee house dating from 1654, claimed (along with others) to be the oldest in Oxford. Just north of the Queen's Lane Coffee House, on the eastern side of the lane, is the main entrance to St Edmund Hall. The 12th-century church of St Peter-in-the-East, which was deconsecrated in the 1970s and is now the library of St Edmund Hall, is situated to the north of the college's entrance. There is a bend in the lane about halfway along, following the boundaries of the surrounding colleges. The lane is largely surrounded by high stone walls with few windows, but with ...
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Queen's Lane Coffee House
Queen's Lane Coffee House is a historic coffee house established by Cirques Jobson, a Levantine Jew from Syria. Dating back to 1654, it claims to be the oldest continually serving coffee house in Europe although, it has only been on the present site, (Oxford, England) since 1970. The coffee house is where Jeremy Bentham first developed the concept of utilitarianism. The coffee house is situated on the north side of the High Street (at No. 40), on the corner of Queen's Lane, hence the name "Queen's Lane Coffee House". Close by are The Queen's College to the west and St Edmund Hall to the north. It is popular with University of Oxford and Oxford Brookes University students and tourists alike. In 2009, it rebranded itself as "QL". There is a second, smaller, QL Café and Delicatessen at 126 High Street under the same ownership. Another Café QL (now called Café Bonjour) in Headington was once owned by the same family but was sold years ago. The café has been owned by the same ...
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Queens Lane Turning Into New College Lane Oxford
Queens is a borough of New York City, coextensive with Queens County, in the U.S. state of New York. Located on Long Island, it is the largest New York City borough by area. It is bordered by the borough of Brooklyn at the western tip of Long Island to its west, and Nassau County to its east. Queens also shares water borders with the boroughs of Manhattan, the Bronx, and Staten Island (via the Rockaways). With a population of 2,405,464 as of the 2020 census, Queens is the second most populous county in the State of New York, behind Kings County (Brooklyn), and is therefore also the second most populous of the five New York City boroughs. If Queens became a city, it would rank as the fifth most-populous in the U.S. after New York City, Los Angeles, Chicago, and Houston. Approximately 47% of the residents of Queens are foreign-born. Queens is the most linguistically diverse place on Earth and is one of the most ethnically diverse counties in the United States. Queens was estab ...
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New College, Oxford
New College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. Founded in 1379 by William of Wykeham in conjunction with Winchester College as its feeder school, New College is one of the oldest colleges at the university and was the first to admit undergraduate students. New College also has a reputation for the exceptional academic performance of its students. In 2020, the college ranked first in the Norrington Table, a table assessing the relative performance of Oxford's undergraduates in final examinations. It has the 2nd-highest average Norrington Table ranking over the previous decade. The college is located in the centre of Oxford, between Holywell Street and New College Lane (known for Oxford's Bridge of Sighs), next to All Souls College, Harris Manchester College, Hertford College, The Queen's College and St Edmund Hall. The college's sister college is King's College, Cambridge. The college choir is one of the leading choirs o ...
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Streets In Oxford
Streets is the plural of street, a type of road. Streets or The Streets may also refer to: Music * Streets (band), a rock band fronted by Kansas vocalist Steve Walsh * ''Streets'' (punk album), a 1977 compilation album of various early UK punk bands * '' Streets...'', a 1975 album by Ralph McTell * '' Streets: A Rock Opera'', a 1991 album by Savatage * "Streets" (song) by Doja Cat, from the album ''Hot Pink'' (2019) * "Streets", a song by Avenged Sevenfold from the album ''Sounding the Seventh Trumpet'' (2001) * The Streets, alias of Mike Skinner, a British rapper * "The Streets" (song) by WC featuring Snoop Dogg and Nate Dogg, from the album ''Ghetto Heisman'' (2002) Other uses * ''Streets'' (film), a 1990 American horror film * Streets (ice cream), an Australian ice cream brand owned by Unilever * Streets (solitaire), a variant of the solitaire game Napoleon at St Helena * Tai Streets (born 1977), American football player * Will Streets (1886–1916), English soldier and p ...
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Merton Street
Merton Street is a historic and picturesque cobbled street in central Oxford, England.Merton StreetHigh Street, Oxford
It joins the at its northeastern end, between the (together with the ...
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Broad Street, Oxford
Broad Street is a wide street in central Oxford, England, just north of the former city wall. The street is known for its bookshops, including the original Blackwell's bookshop at number 50, located here due to the University of Oxford. Among residents, the street is traditionally known as The Broad. Location In Broad Street are Balliol College, Oxford, Balliol College, Trinity College, Oxford, Trinity College, Exeter College, Oxford, Exeter College (front entrance in the adjoining Turl Street). The Museum of the History of Science, Oxford, Museum of the History of Science (in the original Ashmolean Museum building), the Clarendon Building, the Sheldonian Theatre and the Weston Library (renamed in 2015, part of the Bodleian Library, the main University library in Oxford) are important historical Oxford University buildings at the eastern end of the street. These buildings form the ''de facto'' centre of the University, since most academic buildings in the centre of Oxford are own ...
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Daily Information
''Daily Information'' (or ''Daily Info'' for short) is a printed information sheet in Oxford, England, displayed especially around the University colleges and departments, but also in local businesses. It has been in continuous existence since 28 September 1964, mostly as a brightly coloured A2 sheet, with premises originally in Warnborough Road, North Oxford. It provides information on events in and outside of Oxford, as well as reviews and small advertisements. Daily Information used to be published daily, as its name implies, but now appears on Tuesdays and Fridays during both university term-time and the vacation. It was founded and then run for 40 years by John Rose (26 April 1925, Tunbridge Wells Royal Tunbridge Wells is a town in Kent, England, southeast of central London. It lies close to the border with East Sussex on the northern edge of the High Weald, whose sandstone geology is exemplified by the rock formation High Rocks. T ... – 17 December 2004). Daily ...
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Covered Bridge
A covered bridge is a timber-truss bridge with a roof, decking, and siding, which in most covered bridges create an almost complete enclosure. The purpose of the covering is to protect the wooden structural members from the weather. Uncovered wooden bridges typically have a lifespan of only 20 years because of the effects of rain and sun, but a covered bridge could last over 100 years. In the United States, only about 1 in 10 survived the 20th century. The relatively small number of surviving bridges is due to deliberate replacement, neglect, and the high cost of restoration. European and North American truss bridges Typically, covered bridges are structures with longitudinal timber-trusses which form the bridge's backbone. Some were built as railway bridges, using very heavy timbers and doubled up lattice work. In Canada and the U.S., numerous timber covered bridges were built in the late 1700s to the late 1800s, reminiscent of earlier designs in Germany and Switzerland. Th ...
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All Souls College, Oxford
All Souls College (official name: College of the Souls of All the Faithful Departed) is a constituent college of the University of Oxford in England. Unique to All Souls, all of its members automatically become fellows (i.e., full members of the college's governing body). It has no undergraduate members, but each year, recent graduate and postgraduate students at Oxford are eligible to apply for a small number of examination fellowships through a competitive examination (once described as "the hardest exam in the world") and, for those shortlisted after the examinations, an interview.Is the All Souls College entrance exam easy now?
, ''The Guardian'', 17 May 2010.
The college entrance is on the north side of
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Macmillan Publishers
Macmillan Publishers (occasionally known as the Macmillan Group; formally Macmillan Publishers Ltd and Macmillan Publishing Group, LLC) is a British publishing company traditionally considered to be one of the 'Big Five' English language publishers. Founded in London in 1843 by Scottish brothers Daniel and Alexander MacMillan, the firm would soon establish itself as a leading publisher in Britain. It published two of the best-known works of Victorian era children’s literature, Lewis Carroll's ''Alice's Adventures in Wonderland'' (1865) and Rudyard Kipling's '' The Jungle Book'' (1894). Former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Harold Macmillan, grandson of co-founder Daniel, was chairman of the company from 1964 until his death in December 1986. Since 1999, Macmillan has been a wholly owned subsidiary of Holtzbrinck Publishing Group with offices in 41 countries worldwide and operations in more than thirty others. History Macmillan was founded in London in 1843 by D ...
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The Encyclopaedia Of Oxford
''The Encyclopaedia of Oxford'' is an encyclopaedia covering the history of Oxford in England. The book was published by Macmillan in 1988 (). It was edited by the Oxford-educated historian Christopher Hibbert with the help of the associate editor, his brother Edward Hibbert. The encyclopaedia was published in hardback and then a paperback version (Papermac, reissued in 1992, ), but only one edition was produced and copies are now sought, typically selling for more than the original selling price of £25 for the hardback edition, even in paperback form. The book mainly consists of detailed historical entries in alphabetical order. Many entries concern the University of Oxford and its colleges. Appendices include lists of notable people who have held important offices associated with Oxford, especially the University, in date order. See also * '' The London Encyclopaedia'', also edited by Christopher Hibbert References 1988 non-fiction books Oxford Oxford () is ...
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New College Lane
New College Lane is a historic street in central Oxford, England, named after New College, one of the older Oxford colleges, adjacent to the north. In 2010, New College Lane was named Britain's fourth most picturesque street, as part of Google's Street View Awards. Description At the northwestern end of New College Lane is a junction with Catte Street, with the Sheldonian Theatre opposite. The main feature is the Bridge of Sighs, a covered bridge connecting two parts of Hertford College, which was completed in 1914 and attracts many tourists for the view. Also to the north is a small alley leading past some of the historic city wall to the Turf Tavern, a hidden but favourite public house for students and tourists. The lane has three bends as it winds its way between the surrounding colleges. There is a rear entrance to New College. The lane is largely surrounded by high stone walls, with few windows. Some good examples of gargoyles can be seen, a feature of Oxford colleg ...
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