Phalerus
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Phalerus
In Greek mythology, Phalerus (; Ancient Greek: Φάληρος) was the son of Alcon from Athens. He is counted among the Argonauts.Apollonius Rhodius, ''Argonautica'', 1. 96 - 97Pausanias, ''Description of Greece'', 1. 1. 4 He also attended the wedding of Pirithous and Hippodamia. Mythology Phalerus was Alcon's only son, his father took pride in sending him forth to join the Argonauts, so that he would shine conspicuous among those bold heroes, “yet no other sons had he to care for his old age and livelihood”. It is related of Phalerus that he escaped from Athens to Chalcis in Euboea together with his daughter Chalciope; the Chalcidians refused to deliver him up at the demand of his father. He is credited with having founded Gyrton; he and Acamas are also the reputed founders of the temple of Aphrodite and Isis in Soli. In Phalerum, of which he presumably was the eponym, there was an altar to his and Theseus’s children. Phalerus was also the name of a Trojan killed by N ...
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Jason And The Argonauts (1963 Film)
''Jason and the Argonauts'' (working title: ''Jason and the Golden Fleece'') is a 1963 Anglo-American independent mythological fantasy adventure film distributed by Columbia Pictures. It was produced by Charles H. Schneer, directed by Don Chaffey, and stars Todd Armstrong, while co-starring Nancy Kovack, Honor Blackman, and Gary Raymond. Shot in Eastman Color, the film was made in collaboration with stop-motion animation master Ray Harryhausen and is known for its various legendary creatures, notably the iconic fight scene featuring seven skeleton warriors. Although it was a box-office disappointment during its initial release, the film was critically acclaimed and later became a cult classic. The film score was composed by Bernard Herrmann, who had partnered with Harryhausen on ''The 7th Voyage of Sinbad'' (1958), ''The 3 Worlds of Gulliver'' (1960) and '' Mysterious Island'' (1961). Plot Pelias usurps the throne of Thessaly, killing King Aristo. A prophecy states that one o ...
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Andrew Faulds
Andrew Matthew William Faulds (1 March 1923 – 31 May 2000) was a British actor and Labour Party politician. After a successful acting career on stage, on radio and in films, he was a Member of Parliament from 1966 to 1997. Early life Faulds was born to missionary parents in Isoko, Tanganyika. He married Bunty Whitfield in 1945. During the Second World War he served in both the Royal Air Force and the Fleet Air Arm. After graduating from the University of Glasgow, he joined the Royal Shakespeare Company in 1948. However, he first came to a wider public recognition playing Jet Morgan in Charles Chilton's radio drama '' Journey into Space'' on the BBC Light Programme. Acting career In 1959, Faulds and his wife played host to Paul Robeson, who had travelled to Britain to appear at the Royal Shakespeare Theatre, Stratford-upon-Avon in Tony Richardson's production of ''Othello''. Robeson had only recently been permitted again to travel abroad, following the revocation of his ...
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Chalciope
Chalciope (; grc, Χαλκιόπη, Khalkiópē means "bronze-face"), in Greek mythology, is a name that may refer to several characters. * Chalciope, daughter of King Aeetes of Colchis, sister of Medea and wife of Phrixus, by whom she had four sons: Argus, Phrontis, Melas and Cytisorus (some authors add Presbon).Hyginus, ''Fabulae'' 3 (he erroneously refers to Cytisorus as "Cylindrus") When Aeetes was dethroned and banished by his brother Perses, Chalciope expressed great filial devotion and stayed by her father's side, even though he had killed her husband. Hesiod referred to her as Iophossa, and Pherecydes as Euenia. *Chalciope, daughter of Rhexenor (or of King Chalcodon of Euboea) and the second wife of Aegeas, with whom he had no heirs. *Chalciope, daughter of Eurypylus of Cos, mother of Thessalus by Heracles. *Chalciope, consort of the aforementioned Thessalus, mother of his son Antiphus, presumably also of Pheidippus and Nesson. *Chalciope or Chalcippe, daught ...
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Phaleristics
Phaleristics, from the Greek mythological hero Phalerus ( el, links=no, Φάληρος, ''Phaleros'') via the Latin ('heroics'), sometimes spelled faleristics, is an auxiliary science of history and numismatics which studies orders, fraternities, and award items, such as medals, ribbons, and other decorations. Definition The subject includes orders of chivalry (including military orders), orders of merit, and fraternal orders. These may all in turn be official, national, state entities, or civil, religious, or academic-related ones. The field of study also comprises comparative honour systems, and thus in a broader sense also history (art history), sociology, and anthropology. In terms of objects, these include award items such as medals and their accessories, ribbon bars, badges, pins, award certificate documentation, etc., and phaleristics may also designate the field of collecting related items. Although established as a scientific sub-discipline of history, phale ...
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Argonautica
The ''Argonautica'' ( el, Ἀργοναυτικά , translit=Argonautika) is a Greek epic poem written by Apollonius Rhodius in the 3rd century BC. The only surviving Hellenistic epic, the ''Argonautica'' tells the myth of the voyage of Jason and the Argonauts to retrieve the Golden Fleece from remote Colchis. Their heroic adventures and Jason's relationship with the dangerous Colchian princess/sorceress Medea were already well known to Hellenistic audiences, which enabled Apollonius to go beyond a simple narrative, giving it a scholarly emphasis suitable to the times. It was the age of the great Library of Alexandria, and his epic incorporates his research in geography, ethnography, comparative religion, and Homeric literature. However, his main contribution to the epic tradition lies in his development of the love between hero and heroine – he seems to have been the first narrative poet to study "the pathology of love". His ''Argonautica'' had a profound impact on Latin ...
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Alcon (mythology)
The name Alcon (; Ancient Greek: Ἄλκων) or Alco can refer to a number of people from classical myth: * Alcon, a Laconian prince as the son of King Hippocoon, usurper of Tyndareus. He was one of the hunters of the Calydonian Boar. Alcon was killed, together with his father and brothers, by Heracles, and had a heroon at Sparta. * Alcon, a son of Erechtheus, king of Athens, and father of Phalerus the Argonaut. Gaius Valerius Flaccus represents him as such a skillful archer that once, when a serpent had entwined his son, he shot the serpent without hurting his child. Virgil mentions an Alcon, whom Servius calls a Cretan, and of whom he relates almost the same story as that which Valerius Flaccus ascribes to Alcon, the son of Erechtheus. *Alcon, son of Abas, king of the Abantes in Euboea and thus, brother to Arethousa and Dias. He may also be a brother to Canethus and Chalcodon, father of Elephenor. *Alcon, a son of Ares, and another one of the hunters of the Calydonian Bo ...
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Argonauts
The Argonauts (; Ancient Greek: ) were a band of heroes in Greek mythology, who in the years before the Trojan War (around 1300 BC) accompanied Jason to Colchis in his quest to find the Golden Fleece. Their name comes from their ship, ''Argo'', named after its builder, Argus. They were sometimes called Minyans, after a prehistoric tribe in the area. Mythology The Golden Fleece After the death of King Cretheus, the Aeolian Pelias usurped the throne from his half-brother Aeson and became king of Iolcus in Thessaly (near the modern city of Volos). Because of this unlawful act, an oracle warned him that a descendant of Aeolus would seek revenge. Pelias put to death every prominent descendant of Aeolus he could, but spared Aeson because of the pleas of their mother Tyro. Instead, Pelias kept Aeson prisoner and forced him to renounce his inheritance. Aeson married Alcimede, who bore him a son named Jason. Pelias intended to kill the baby at once, but Alcimede summoned her kinsw ...
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Apollonius Rhodius
Apollonius of Rhodes ( grc, Ἀπολλώνιος Ῥόδιος ''Apollṓnios Rhódios''; la, Apollonius Rhodius; fl. first half of 3rd century BC) was an ancient Greek author, best known for the ''Argonautica'', an epic poem about Jason and the Argonauts and their quest for the Golden Fleece. The poem is one of the few extant examples of the epic genre and it was both innovative and influential, providing Ptolemaic Egypt with a "cultural mnemonic" or national "archive of images", and offering the Latin poets Virgil and Gaius Valerius Flaccus a model for their own epics. His other poems, which survive only in small fragments, concerned the beginnings or foundations of cities, such as Alexandria and Cnidus places of interest to the Ptolemies, whom he served as a scholar and librarian at the Library of Alexandria. A literary dispute with Callimachus, another Alexandrian librarian/poet, is a topic much discussed by modern scholars since it is thought to give some insight into the ...
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Isis
Isis (; ''Ēse''; ; Meroitic: ''Wos'' 'a''or ''Wusa''; Phoenician: 𐤀𐤎, romanized: ʾs) was a major goddess in ancient Egyptian religion whose worship spread throughout the Greco-Roman world. Isis was first mentioned in the Old Kingdom () as one of the main characters of the Osiris myth, in which she resurrects her slain brother and husband, the divine king Osiris, and produces and protects his heir, Horus. She was believed to help the dead enter the afterlife as she had helped Osiris, and she was considered the divine mother of the pharaoh, who was likened to Horus. Her maternal aid was invoked in healing Spell (paranormal), spells to benefit ordinary people. Originally, she played a limited role in royal rituals and temple rites, although she was more prominent in funerary practices and magical texts. She was usually portrayed in art as a human woman wearing a throne-like hieroglyph on her head. During the New Kingdom (), as she took on traits that originally belon ...
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Athens, Greece
Athens ( ; el, Αθήνα, Athína ; grc, Ἀθῆναι, Athênai (pl.) ) is both the capital city, capital and List of cities and towns in Greece, largest city of Greece. With a population close to four million, it is also the seventh List of urban areas in the European Union, largest city in the European Union. Athens dominates and is the capital of the Attica (region), Attica region and is one of the List of oldest continuously inhabited cities, world's oldest cities, with its recorded history spanning over 3,400 years and its earliest human presence beginning somewhere between the 11th and 7th millennia BC. Classical Athens was a powerful Greek city-state, city-state. It was a centre for the arts, learning and philosophy, and the home of Plato's Platonic Academy, Academy and Aristotle's Lyceum (classical), Lyceum. It is widely referred to as the cradle of civilization, cradle of Western culture, Western civilization and the democracy#History, birthplace of democracy, larg ...
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Quintus Smyrnaeus
Quintus Smyrnaeus (also Quintus of Smyrna; el, Κόϊντος Σμυρναῖος, ''Kointos Smyrnaios'') was a Greek epic poet whose ''Posthomerica'', following "after Homer", continues the narration of the Trojan War. The dates of Quintus Smyrnaeus' life and poetry are disputed: by tradition, he is thought to have lived in the latter part of the 4th century AD, but early dates have also been proposed. His epic in fourteen books, known as the ''Posthomerica'', covers the period between the end of Homer's ''Iliad'' and the end of the Trojan War. Its primary importance is as the earliest surviving work to cover this period, the archaic works in the Epic Cycle, which he knew and drew upon, having been lost. His materials are borrowed from the cyclic poems from which Virgil (with whose works he was probably acquainted) also drew, in particular the ''Aethiopis'' (''Coming of Memnon'') and the '' Iliupersis'' (''Destruction of Troy'') of Arctinus of Miletus, the now-lost ''Heleneis' ...
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Neoptolemus
In Greek mythology, Neoptolemus (; ), also called Pyrrhus (; ), was the son of the warrior Achilles and the princess Deidamia, and the brother of Oneiros. He became the mythical progenitor of the ruling dynasty of the Molossians of ancient Epirus. From his father, Neoptolemus was sometimes called Achillides, and from his grandfather or great-grandfather, Pelides and Aeacides. Description Neoptolemus was described by the chronicler Malalas in his account of the ''Chronography'' as "of good stature, good chest, thin, white, good nose, ruddy hair, wooly hair, light-eyed, big-eyed, blond eyebrows, blond beginnings of a beard, round-faced, precipitate, daring, agile, a fierce fighter". Meanwhile, in the account of Dares the Phrygian, he was illustrated as ". . .large, robust, and easily irritated. He lisped slightly, and was good-looking, with hooked nose, round eyes, and shaggy eyebrows. Family In some accounts, Neoptolemus was the son of Achilles by Iphigenia instead. Aft ...
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