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Ou River, China
The Ou River () or Oujiang is the second-largest river in the Zhejiang province of eastern China. The river flows before finally reaching the city of Wenzhou and emptying into the East China Sea, into which it discharges of water annually. Shen Jiang (), Jiang Yongjia (), and Wenjiang () are all former names for this river. Fauna The Ou River has a rich fish fauna. A 2010 survey recorded 60 different fish species, with goldfish, bagrid catfish, and ''Pseudobagrus tenuis'' being the most prolific in range. Compared to a 1972 survey, 20 new species were recorded, including two alien species (Mozambique tilapia and largemouth bass); however, 34 species recorded in 1972 were absent in 2010, and overall fish density was lower. Goby ''Pseudorhinogobius aporus'' is endemic to the Ou River system: it is only known from a brook in the upper Ou River system. Notes References Category:Rivers of Zhejiang {{China-river-stub ...
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China
China, officially the People's Republic of China (PRC), is a country in East Asia. It is the world's most populous country, with a population of around 1.4 billion. Covering approximately 9.6 million square kilometers (3.7 million mi2), it is the world's third or fourth-largest country by area. The country is officially divided into 23 provinces, five autonomous regions, four direct-controlled municipalities (Beijing, Tianjin, Shanghai, and Chongqing), and the special administrative regions of Hong Kong and Macau. China emerged as one of the world's first civilizations, in the fertile basin of the Yellow River in the North China Plain. China was one of the world's foremost economic powers for most of the two millennia from the 1st until the 19th century. For millennia, China's political system was based on absolute hereditary monarchies, or dynasties, beginning with the Xia dynasty in 21st century BCE. Since then, China has expanded, fractured, and re-unified numero ...
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Zhejiang
Zhejiang (, formerly romanized as Chekiang) is an eastern, coastal province of the People's Republic of China. Its capital and largest city is Hangzhou. Zhejiang is bordered by Jiangsu and Shanghai to the north, Anhui to the northwest, Jiangxi to the west and Fujian to the south. To the east is the East China Sea, beyond which lies the Ryukyu Islands. The population of Zhejiang stands at 57 million, the 10th highest among China. Other notable cities include Ningbo and Wenzhou. It has been called 'the backbone of China' due to being a major driving force in the Chinese economy and being the birthplace of several notable persons, including the Chinese Nationalist leader Chiang Kai-shek and entrepreneur Jack Ma. Zhejiang consists of 90 counties (incl. county-level cities and districts). The area of Zhejiang was controlled by the Kingdom of Yue during the Spring and Autumn period. The Qin Empire later annexed it in 222 BC. Under the late Ming dynasty and the Qing dynasty that fol ...
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East China Sea
The East China Sea is an arm of the Western Pacific Ocean, located directly offshore from East China (hence the name), covering an area of roughly . Its northern extension between mainland China and the Korean Peninsula is the Yellow Sea, separated by an imaginary line between the eastern tip of Qidong, Jiangsu at the Yangtze River estuary and the southwestern tip of South Korea's Jeju Island. Most is shallow, and near three-fourths is less than , its average depth being . The average average depth is , while the maximum depth is . The East China Sea is bounded in the east and southeast by the middle portion of the first island chain, including the Japanese island of Kyushu and the Ryukyu Islands, and in the south by the island of Taiwan. It connects with the Sea of Japan in the northeast through the Korea Strait, the South China Sea in the southwest via the Taiwan Strait, and the Philippine Sea in the southeast via gaps between the various Ryukyu Islands (e.g. Tokara Strait ...
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Wenzhou
Wenzhou (pronounced ; Wenzhounese: Yuziou y33–11 tɕiɤu33–32 ) is a prefecture-level city in southeastern Zhejiang province in the People's Republic of China. Wenzhou is located at the extreme south east of Zhejiang Province with its borders connecting to Lishui on the west, Taizhou on the north, and Fujian to the south. It is surrounded by mountains, the East China Sea, and 436 islands, while its lowlands are almost entirely along its East China Sea coast, which is nearly in length. Most of Wenzhou's area is mountainous as almost 76 percent of its surface area is classified as mountains and hills. It is said that Wenzhou has 7/10 mountains, 1/10 water, and 2/10 farmland. At the time of the 2010 Chinese census, 3,039,500 people lived in Wenzhou's urban area; the area under its jurisdiction (which includes two satellite cities and six counties) held a population of 9,122,100 of which 31.16% are non-local residents from outside of Wenzhou. Originally known as Yongjia (), W ...
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Nanxi River (Zhejiang)
The Nanxi River () is located in Yongjia County of the Zhejiang Province in eastern China, and is a major tributary of the Ou River. The Nanxi River Scenic Area () was named a National Tourist Scenic Spot by the State Council in 1988 due to its scenic landscape accompanied by its unique local culture. It is 23 kilometres from Wenzhou, east of the Yandang Mountains, north of Xianju County and west of Xiandu County. The Nanxi River is 150 kilometers long and has a drainage area of 2429 square kilometers. It runs from north to south and flows into the Ou River, which empties into the East China Sea. The Nanxi River has 36 bends and 72 beaches. The main scenic spots of the Nanxi River area include Baizhang Waterfall, Furong Triangle Rock, the Waterfall of Tengxi Pool, the Twelve Peaks, Taogong Cave, the Warehouse Under The Cliff, the Furong Ancient Hamlet and Lion Rock. The rock stratum of the mountains is mostly made up of tuff, rhyolite, and granite. The river is located in the subtro ...
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Goldfish
The goldfish (''Carassius auratus'') is a freshwater fish in the family Cyprinidae of order Cypriniformes. It is commonly kept as a pet in indoor aquariums, and is one of the most popular aquarium fish. Native to East Asia, the goldfish is a relatively small member of the carp family (which also includes the Prussian carp and the crucian carp). It was first selectively bred for color in ancient China more than 1,000 years ago, and several distinct breeds have since been developed. Goldfish breeds vary greatly in size, body shape, fin configuration, and coloration (various combinations of white, yellow, orange, red, brown, and black are known). History Ryukin goldfish, Plate XIX in ''Goldfish and Their Culture in Japan'', by Shinnosuke Matsubara Various species of carp (collectively known as Asian carp) have been bred and reared as food fish for thousands of years in East Asia. Some of these normally gray or silver species have a tendency to produce red, orange or yellow color ...
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Bagrid Catfish
The Bagridae are a family of catfish that are native to Africa (''Bagrus'') and Asia (all other genera) from Japan to Borneo. It includes about 245 species. These fish are commonly known as naked catfishes or bagrid catfishes. Large bagrids are important as food fish. Some species are kept as aquarium fishes. Physical characteristics The dorsal fin is preceded by a spine. The adipose fin is present and can have a relatively long base in some species. The pectoral fin spine can be serrated. The body is completely naked (they have no scales). The maximum length is about . Fishes of the family Bagridae have four pairs of well-developed barbels covered by a layer of taste bud-enriched epithelium. Taxonomy The taxonomy of this family has changed rapidly. Nelson (2006) comments how "the family is very different from that recognized in Nelson (1994)". Claroteidae and Austroglanididae contain species that were previously bagrids. Auchenoglanididae is considered by some sources to be a su ...
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Pseudobagrus Tenuis
''Pseudobagrus'' is a genus of bagrid catfishes that inhabit streams and rivers throughout East Asia. About half of these species occur in China. The two ''Coreobagrus'' species, ''C. brevicorpus'' and ''C. ichikiwai'', are both treated in some recent literature as valid in ''Pseudobagrus''. It has been noted that ''Pelteobagrus'' may not be monophyletic if species placed in ''Pseudobagrus'' and ''Coreobagrus'' were excluded. The taxonomy of this genus is unclear and many authorities treat it as a junior synonym of ''Tachysurus''. ''Pseudobagrus'' species are small- to mid-sized bagrid catfishes. These fish all have an inferior mouth; narial openings widely separated; four pairs of barbels; top of head covered by skin in most species; two dorsal fin spines; pelvic fin small; and caudal fin emarginate, truncate or round. One fossil species, ''P. ikiensis'' Watanabe & Uyeno, is known from the Middle Miocene of Japan.Watanabe, K. and Uyeno, T.; ''Fossil bagrid catfishes from Japan ...
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Alien Species
(''Melilotus sp.''), introduced and naturalized in the Americas from Europe as a forage and cover crop An introduced species, alien species, exotic species, adventive species, immigrant species, foreign species, non-indigenous species, or non-native species is a species living outside its native distributional range, but which has arrived there by human activity, directly or indirectly, and either deliberately or accidentally. Non-native species can have various effects on the local ecosystem. Introduced species that become established and spread beyond the place of introduction are considered "naturalized". The process of human-caused introduction is distinguished from biological colonization, in which species spread to new areas through "natural" (non-human) means such as storms and rafting. The impact of introduced species is highly variable. Some have a substantial negative effect on a local ecosystem (in which case they are also classified more specifically as an invasive sp ...
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Mozambique Tilapia
The Mozambique tilapia (''Oreochromis mossambicus'') is an oreochromine cichlid fish native to southeastern Africa. Dull colored, the Mozambique tilapia often lives up to a decade in its native habitats. It is a popular fish for aquaculture. Due to human introductions, it is now found in many tropical and subtropical habitats around the globe, where it can become an invasive species because of its robust nature. These same features make it a good species for aquaculture because it readily adapts to new situations. It is known as black tilapia in Colombia and as blue kurper in South Africa. Description The native Mozambique tilapia is laterally compressed, and has a deep body with long dorsal fins, the front part of which have spines. Native coloration is a dull greenish or yellowish, and weak banding may be seen. Adults reach up to in standard length and up to . Size and coloration may vary in captive and naturalized populations due to environmental and breeding pressures. It li ...
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Largemouth Bass
The largemouth bass (''Micropterus salmoides'') is a carnivorous freshwater gamefish in the Centrarchidae (sunfish) family, a species of black bass native to the eastern and central United States, southeastern Canada and northern Mexico, but widely introduced elsewhere. It is known by a variety of regional names, such as the widemouth bass, bigmouth bass, black bass, bucketmouth, largies, Potter's fish, Florida bass, Florida largemouth, green bass, bucketmouth bass, Green trout, gilsdorf bass, Oswego bass, LMB, and southern largemouth and (paradoxically) northern largemouth. The largemouth bass is the state fish of Georgia and Mississippi, and the state freshwater fish of Florida and Alabama. Description The largemouth bass is an olive-green to greenish gray fish, marked by a series of dark, sometimes black, blotches forming a jagged horizontal stripe along each flank. The upper jaw (maxilla) of a largemouth bass extends beyond the rear margin of the orbit. The largemouth is the ...
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Endemic
Endemism is the state of a species being native to a single defined geographic location, such as an island, state, nation, country or other defined zone; organisms that are indigenous to a place are not endemic to it if they are also found elsewhere. For example, the Cape sugarbird is exclusively found in southwestern South Africa and is therefore said to be ''endemic'' to that particular part of the world. The extreme opposite of an endemic species is one with a cosmopolitan distribution, having a global or widespread range. A rare alternative term for a species that is endemic is 'precinctive', which applies to species (and other taxonomic levels) that are restricted to a defined geographical area. Other terms that may be used interchangeably, but less often, include autochthonal, autochthonic, and indigenous. Etymology The word ''endemic'' is from New Latin ''endēmicus'', from Greek ενδήμος, ''endēmos'', "native". ''Endēmos'' is formed of ''en'' meaning "in", and ...
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