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New College Lane
New College Lane is a historic street in central Oxford Oxford () is a city in England. It is the county town and only city of Oxfordshire. In 2020, its population was estimated at 151,584. It is north-west of London, south-east of Birmingham and north-east of Bristol. The city is home to the Un ..., England England is a Countries of the United Kingdom, country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to its west and Scotland to its north. The Irish Sea lies northwest and the Celtic Sea to the southwest. It is separa ..., named after New College, one of the older Oxford Oxford () is a city in England. It is the county town and only city of Oxfordshire. In 2020, its population was estimated at 151,584. It is north-west of London, south-east of Birmingham and north-east of Bristol. The city is home to the Un ... colleges, adjacent to the north. In 2010, New College Lane was named Britain's fourth most picturesque street, a ...
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Bridge Of Sighs Oxford 20040124
A bridge is a structure built to span a physical obstacle (such as a body of water, valley, road, or rail) without blocking the way underneath. It is constructed for the purpose of providing passage over the obstacle, which is usually something that is otherwise difficult or impossible to cross. There are many different designs of bridges, each serving a particular purpose and applicable to different situations. Designs of bridges vary depending on factors such as the function of the bridge, the nature of the terrain Terrain or relief (also topography, topographical relief) involves the vertical and horizontal dimensions of land surface. The term bathymetry is used to describe underwater relief, while hypsometry studies terrain relative to sea level. The ... where the bridge is constructed and anchored, and the material used to make it, and the funds available to build it. The earliest bridges were likely made with fallen trees and stepping stones Stepping stones o ...
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Turf Tavern
The Turf Tavern (or just "the Turf") is a historic pub in central Oxford Oxford () is a city in England. It is the county town and only city of Oxfordshire. In 2020, its population was estimated at 151,584. It is north-west of London, south-east of Birmingham and north-east of Bristol. The city is home to the Un ..., England England is a Countries of the United Kingdom, country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to its west and Scotland to its north. The Irish Sea lies northwest and the Celtic Sea to the southwest. It is separa .... Its foundations and use as a malt house and drinking tavern date back to 1381. The low-beamed front bar area was put in place sometime in the 17th century. It was originally called the Spotted Cow but the name was changed in 1842, likely as part of an effort to extinguish its reputation as a venue for illegal gambling activities. The pub is frequented primarily by university students (of both Oxfor ...
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Merton Street
Merton Street is a historic and picturesque cobbled street in central Oxford, England.Merton StreetHigh Street, Oxford
It joins the High Street, Oxford, High Street at its northeastern end, between the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art (together with the Examination Schools) and the Eastgate Hotel at the historic east gate of the city. It then runs east–west, parallel and to the south of the High Street for most of its length.


Location

Merton College, one of Oxford's older colleges, is situated to the south of the street. To the west of Merton, Corpus Christi College, Oxford, Corpus Christi College, one of Oxford's smallest colleges, also fronts onto the street. A ...
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Broad Street, Oxford
Broad Street is a wide street in central Oxford, England, just north of the former city wall. The street is known for its bookshops, including the original Blackwell's bookshop at number 50, located here due to the University of Oxford. Among residents, the street is traditionally known as The Broad. Location In Broad Street are Balliol College, Oxford, Balliol College, Trinity College, Oxford, Trinity College, Exeter College, Oxford, Exeter College (front entrance in the adjoining Turl Street). The Museum of the History of Science, Oxford, Museum of the History of Science (in the original Ashmolean Museum building), the Clarendon Building, the Sheldonian Theatre and the Weston Library (renamed in 2015, part of the Bodleian Library, the main University library in Oxford) are important historical Oxford University buildings at the eastern end of the street. These buildings form the ''de facto'' centre of the University, since most academic buildings in the centre of Oxford are own ...
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Isis Magazine
''The Isis'' is a student publication at the University of Oxford, where the magazine was established in 1892. Traditionally a rival to the student newspaper ''Cherwell (newspaper), Cherwell'', ''Isis'' was finally acquired by the latter's publishing house, Oxford Student Publications Limited, in the late 1990s. It now operates as a termly magazine and website, providing an outlet for features journalism, although for most of its life it appeared weekly. The two publications are named after the two rivers in Oxford, "Isis" being the local name for the River Thames. Since 2014, the magazine's name has often been confused with ISIS, the translated abbreviation of a terrorist organization operating in Iraq and Syria. However, whereas the latter is an abbreviation and is always capitalized, the magazine's is a proper noun distinguished by its lowercase characters. History ''The Isis'' was founded by Mostyn Turtle Piggott, the first of the student editors, on 27 April 1892. In his ...
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Stone Tape
The Stone Tape Theory is the speculation that ghosts and hauntings are analogous to tape recorder, tape recordings, and that mental impressions during emotional or traumatic events can be projected in the form of energy, "recorded" onto rocks and other items and "replayed" under certain conditions. The idea draws inspiration and shares similarities with views of 19th-century intellectualists and psychic researchers, such as Charles Babbage, Eleanor Mildred Sidgwick, Eleonor Sidgwick and Edmund Gurney. Contemporarily, the concept was popularized by a 1972 Christmas ghost story called ''The Stone Tape'', produced by the BBC. Following the play's popularity, the idea and the term "stone tape" were retrospectively and inaccurately attributed to the British Archaeology, archaeologist turned Parapsychology, parapsychologist T. C. Lethbridge, who believed that ghosts were not spirits of the deceased, but were simply non-interactive recordings similar to a Film, movie. History The ide ...
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Prince Rupert
Prince Rupert of the Rhine, Duke of Cumberland, (17 December 1619 (O.S.) / 27 December (N.S.) – 29 November 1682 (O.S.)) was an English army officer, admiral, scientist and colonial governor. He first came to prominence as a Cavalier, Royalist cavalry commander during the English Civil War.). Rupert was the third son of the Germans, German Prince Frederick V of the Palatinate and Elizabeth of Bohemia, Elizabeth, eldest daughter of King James VI and I of Scotland and England. Prince Rupert had a varied career. He was a soldier as a child, fighting alongside Dutch Republic, Dutch forces against Habsburg Spain during the Eighty Years' War (1568–1648), and against the Holy Roman Emperor in Holy Roman Empire, Germany during the Thirty Years' War (1618–1648). Aged 23, he was appointed commander of the Royalist cavalry during the English Civil War, becoming the archetypal "Cavalier" of the war and ultimately the senior Royalist general. He surrendered after the Siege of Bristol ...
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English Civil War
The English Civil War (1642–1651) was a series of civil wars and political machinations between Parliamentarians ("Roundheads") and Royalists led by Charles I ("Cavaliers"), mainly over the manner of Kingdom of England, England's governance and issues of religious freedom. It was part of the wider Wars of the Three Kingdoms. The First English Civil War, first (1642–1646) and Second English Civil War, second (1648–1649) wars pitted the supporters of King Charles I of England, Charles I against the supporters of the Long Parliament, while the Third English Civil War, third (1649–1651) saw fighting between supporters of King Charles II of England, Charles II and supporters of the Rump Parliament. The wars also involved the Covenanters, Scottish Covenanters and Confederate Ireland, Irish Confederates. The war ended with Parliamentarian victory at the Battle of Worcester on 3 September 1651. Unlike other list of English civil wars, civil wars in England, which were mainly ...
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Emily Benn
Emily Sophia Wedgwood Benn (born 4 October 1989) is an English politician. She was an unsuccessful Parliamentary candidate in both the 2010 United Kingdom general election, 2010 and 2015 United Kingdom general election, 2015 UK general elections. At the 2014 Croydon Council election, 2014 local elections, Benn was elected to the West Thornton ward of London Borough of Croydon, Croydon Borough Council, serving until 2016. At the 2022 City of London Corporation election, 2022 local elections, she was elected to the Bread Street ward of the City of London Corporation. She is the eldest child and only daughter of Stephen Benn, 3rd Viscount Stansgate, The 3rd Viscount Stansgate and Nita Clarke (née Bowes), and the granddaughter of the late Labour MP Tony Benn. Early and family life Benn was born in 1989 in Croydon, England, at the time that the Labour Party Conference of that year was being held. As the daughter of a viscount, she is entitled to be styled as ''The Honourable''. Benn ...
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Halley's Comet
Halley's Comet or Comet Halley, officially designated 1P/Halley, is a List of periodic comets, short-period comet visible from Earth every 75–79 years. Halley is the only known short-period comet that is regularly visible to the naked eye from Earth, and thus the only naked-eye comet that can appear twice in a human lifetime. Halley last appeared in the inner parts of the Solar System in 1986 and will next appear in mid-2061. Halley's periodic returns to the inner Solar System have been observed and recorded by astronomers around the world since at least 240 BC. But it was not until 1705 that the English astronomer Edmond Halley understood that these appearances were reappearances of the same comet. As a result of this discovery, the comet is named after Halley. During its 1986 visit to the inner Solar System, Halley's Comet became the first comet to be observed in detail by spacecraft, providing the first observational data on the structure of a comet nucleus and the mecha ...
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Edmond Halley
Edmond (or Edmund) Halley (; – ) was an English astronomer, mathematician and physicist. He was the second Astronomer Royal in Britain, succeeding John Flamsteed in 1720. From an observatory he constructed on Saint Helena in 1676–77, Halley catalogued the southern celestial hemisphere and recorded a transit of Mercury across the Sun. He realised that a similar transit of Venus could be used to determine the distances between Earth, Venus, and the Sun. Upon his return to England, he was made a fellow of the Royal Society, and with the help of King Charles II of England, Charles II, was granted a master's degree from University of Oxford, Oxford. Halley encouraged and helped fund the publication of Isaac Newton's influential ''Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica'' (1687). From observations Halley made in September 1682, he used Newton's laws of motion to compute the periodicity of Halley's Comet in his 1705 ''Synopsis of the Astronomy of Comets''. It was named afte ...
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Blue Plaque
A blue plaque is a permanent sign installed in a public place in the United Kingdom and elsewhere to commemorate a link between that location and a famous person, event, or former building on the site, serving as a historical marker. The term is used in the United Kingdom in two different senses. It may be used narrowly and specifically to refer to the "official" scheme administered by English Heritage, and currently restricted to sites within Greater London; or it may be used less formally to encompass a number of similar schemes administered by organisations throughout the UK. The plaques erected are made in a variety of designs, shapes, materials and colours: some are blue, others are not. However, the term "blue plaque" is often used informally to encompass all such schemes. The "official" scheme traces its origins to that launched in 1866 in London, on the initiative of the politician William Ewart (British politician), William Ewart, to mark the homes and workplaces of fa ...
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