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Ministry Of The Interior (Israel)
The Ministry of Interior ( he|משרד הפנים, ''Misrad HaPnim''; ar|وزارة الداخلية) in the State of Israel is one of the government offices that is responsible for local government, citizenship and residency, identity cards, and student and entry visas. Responsibilities * Providing citizenship and permanent resident status. * Issuing of entry visas and staying visas in the country. * Inhabitants administration: personal registration ** Issuing of Israeli identity cards. ** Issuing of Israeli passports. ** Personal registrations such as birth, marriage etc. * Local government, city councils and local councils supervision * Elections * Associations * Planning and building supervising Departments * The Administration for Local Government and Administration * Administration for Budgeting and Developing in the Local Authorities * Wing for Inspection in the Local Authorities * Administration of Planning * Administration of Border check points, Population and Immigratio ...
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Aryeh Deri
Aryeh Makhlouf Deri (, ), also Arie Deri, Arye Deri, or Arieh Deri (born 17 February 1959), is an Israeli politician. He is one of Shas' founders, and acts on its behalf as Minister of the Interior, Minister of the Development of the Negev and Galilee, and a member in the Security Cabinet of Israel. He previously served as Minister of the Economy. In 1999, Deri was convicted of bribery, fraud, and breach of trust, and given a three-year jail sentence. At the end of 2012, ahead of the elections for the nineteenth Knesset, he returned to lead the Shas party. He was placed in the 2nd position, and was re-elected to the Knesset. In May 2013, he was re-appointed to the role of Shas chairman. Biography Aryeh Mahlouf Deri was born in Meknes, Morocco, to Esther (née Azougi) and Eliyahu Deri. His parents lived in one of the new wealthy districts of the city, and were influenced by the French culture. His father owned a successful business of tailoring, and his family were traditional Jews ...
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Elections In Israel
Elections in Israel are based on nationwide proportional representation. The electoral threshold is currently set at 3.25%, with the number of seats a party receives in the Knesset being proportional to the number of votes it receives. The Knesset is elected for a four-year term, although most governments have not served a full term and early elections are a frequent occurrence. Israel has a multi-party system based on coalition governments as no party has ever won a majority of seats in a national election, although the Alignment briefly held a majority following its formation by an alliance of several different parties prior to the 1969 elections. The legal voting age for Israeli citizens is 18. Elections are overseen by the Central Elections Committee, and are held according to the Knesset Elections Law. Electoral procedure Under normal circumstances, Israel's Basic Law requires national elections for the Knesset to take place on a Tuesday in the Jewish month of Cheshvan (early ...
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Sixth Government Of Israel
The sixth government of Israel was formed by Moshe Sharett during the second Knesset on 29 June 1955. Sharett dropped the General Zionists and the Progressive Party from his coalition, which included Mapai, Mizrachi, Hapoel HaMizrachi, the Democratic List for Israeli Arabs, Progress and Work and Agriculture and Development. The only changes to the cabinet from the previous government were the dropping of General Zionist ministers Yosef Serlin, Israel Rokach and Yosef Sapir; instead of appointing new ministers to the cabinet to replace them, Sharett divided their portfolios out between existing ministers. Although his party departed from the coalition, Progressive Party MK Pinchas Rosen remained Minister of Justice. With the exception of Deputy Minister Kalman Kahana who resigned on 15 August, the government remained in place until 3 November 1955, more than three months after the July 1955 elections. External linksSecond Knesset: Government 6 {{Israeli governments 06 Category:1 ...
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Fifth Government Of Israel
The fifth government of Israel was formed by Moshe Sharett during the second Knesset on 26 January 1954, and was the first government not led by David Ben-Gurion. Sharett kept the same coalition partners as during the fourth government, i.e. Mapai, the General Zionists, the Progressive Party, Mizrachi, Hapoel HaMizrachi, the Democratic List for Israeli Arabs, Progress and Work and Agriculture and Development. The only changes to the previous government were Sharett taking over as PM, Pinhas Lavon as Minister of Defense, the addition of Zalman Aran as a Minister without Portfolio and the dropping of the two Mizrachi and Hapoel HaMizrachi Deputy Ministerial posts. Ben-Gurion returned to the government in February 1955, replacing Lavon following the former's resignation over the Lavon Affair. The government fell when Sharett resigned on 29 June 1955, when the General Zionists refused to abstain from voting on a motion of no-confidence brought by Herut and Maki over the government's p ...
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Fourth Government Of Israel
The fourth government of Israel was formed by David Ben-Gurion during the second Knesset on 24 December 1952. Ben-Gurion dropped the ultra-orthodox parties Agudat Yisrael and Poalei Agudat Yisrael from his coalition and replaced them with the General Zionists and the Progressive Party, who formed the government together with Mapai, Mizrachi, Hapoel HaMizrachi, the Democratic List for Israeli Arabs, Progress and Work and Agriculture and Development. The government fell when Ben-Gurion resigned on 6 December 1953 as he wished to settle in the Negev kibbutz of Sde Boker. External linksKnesset 2: Government 4Knesset website {{Israeli governments 04 Category:1952 establishments in Israel Category:1953 disestablishments in Israel Category:Cabinets established in 1952 Category:Cabinets disestablished in 1953 Category:1952 in Israeli politics Category:1953 in Israeli politics Category:1954 in Israeli politics 04 ...
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General Zionists
The General Zionists ( he|הַצִיּוֹנִים הַכְּלָלִיים, translit. ''HaTzionim HaKlaliym'') were a centrist Zionist movement and a political party in Israel. The General Zionists supported the leadership of Chaim Weizmann and their views were largely colored by central European culture. Their political arm is one of the ancestors of the modern-day Likud. History General Zionism initially referred to the beliefs of the majority of members of the Zionist Organization (ZO) who had not joined a specific faction or party and belonged to their countrywide Zionist organizations only. The term was first used at the 1907 Zionist Congress to describe the delegates who were neither affiliated with Labor Zionism nor religious Zionism. In 1922, various non-aligned groups and individuals established the Organization of General Zionists as a non-ideological party within the Zionist Organization (later the World Zionist Organization) at a time when the Zionist movement was be ...
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Israel Rokah
Israel Rokach, Honorary CBE ( he|ישראל רוקח; December 31, 1896 – September 13, 1959) was an Israeli politician, Knesset member, and fourth mayor of Tel Aviv from November 15, 1936 until April 13, 1953. Biography Israel Rokach was born in 1896 in Neve Tzedek, then part of Jaffa. His mother was Rachel Rokach (born in 1863). His father, Shimon Rokach (born in 1863), a journalist, was one of the founders of the neighborhood. His grandfather, Israel Beck, revived the Hebrew printing industry in Palestine. Rokach attended a cheder and then an Alliance Israélite Universelle school. He traveled to Switzerland, where he continued his education at a high school in Lausanne and then studied electrical engineering at the Zürich polytechnic. In 1920, Israel Rokach moved to the United Kingdom, where he worked as an electrical engineer. In 1922, he returned to Jaffa, where he opened a store for electrical supplies. In 1933, Rokach married Esther Epstein. Rokach died in 1959 and was ...
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Third Government Of Israel
250px|Cabinet ministers leaving Prime Minister's office after the first session of Israel's 3rd Government The third government of Israel was formed by David Ben-Gurion on 8 October 1951, more than two months after the elections. His Mapai party formed a coalition with Mizrachi, Hapoel HaMizrachi, Agudat Yisrael, Poalei Agudat Yisrael and the three Israeli Arab parties, the Democratic List for Israeli Arabs, Progress and Work and Agriculture and Development. There were 15 ministers. Agudat Yisrael and Poalei Agudat Yisrael left the coalition on 23 September 1952 (though Kalman Kahana remained a deputy minister) shortly after disagreements over the conscription of women into the IDF. This left the government with only 60 of the 120 seats in the Knesset.1952 timeline
Jewish Agency for Israel The government resigned on 19 December 1952 due t ...
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Second Government Of Israel
The second government of Israel was formed during the first Knesset. David Ben-Gurion made an attempt to form a minority government consisting of Mapai and Sephardim and Oriental Communities on 17 October, but it was not approved by the Knesset. Two days later President Chaim Weizmann asked Progressive Party leader Pinchas Rosen to form a government,1950 timeline
Jewish Agency for Israel but it was Ben-Gurion who finally managed to do so on 1 November 1950. The coalition partners were the same as in the first government: Mapai, the
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First Government Of Israel
The first government of Israel formed by David Ben-Gurion on 8 March 1949, a month and a half after the elections for the first Knesset. His Mapai party formed a coalition with the United Religious Front, the Progressive Party, the Sephardim and Oriental Communities and the Democratic List of Nazareth, and there were 12 ministers. A notable piece of legislation enacted during the term of the first government was an educational law in 1949 which introduced compulsory schooling for all children between the ages of 5 to 14.''The Challenge Of Israel'' by Misha Louvish. Publisher: Jerusalem Israel Univ Press; 1st Edition (1968) ASIN: B000OKO5U2. Ben-Gurion resigned on 15 October 1950 after the United Religious Front objected to his demands that the Supply and Rationing Ministry be closed and a businessman appointed as Minister for Trade and Industry, as well as issues over education in the new immigrant camps. References External linksKnesset 1: Government 1Knesset website {{Israe ...
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Hapoel HaMizrachi
Hapoel HaMizrachi ( he|הַפּוֹעֵל הַמִּזְרָחִי, lit. ''Mizrachi Workers'') was a political party and settlement movement in Israel. It is one of the predecessors of the National Religious Party and the Jewish Home. History Hapoel HaMizrachi was formed in Jerusalem in 1922 under the Zionist slogan "Torah va'Avodah" (Torah and Labor), as a religious Zionist organisation that supported the founding of religious kibbutzim and moshavim where work was done according to Halakha. Its name came from the Mizrachi Zionist organisation, and is a Hebrew acronym for ''Religious Centre'' (Hebrew: מרכז רוחני, ''Merkaz Ruhani''). For the elections for the first Knesset the party ran as party of a joint list called the United Religious Front alongside Mizrachi, Agudat Yisrael and Poalei Agudat Yisrael. The group won 16 seats, of which Hapoel HaMizrachi took seven, making it the third largest party in the Knesset after Mapai and Mapam. It was invited to join the coalitio ...
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United Religious Front
The United Religious Front (, ''Hazit Datit Meuhedet'') was a political alliance of the four major religious parties in Israel, as well as the Union of Religious Independents, formed to fight the 1949 elections. History The United Religious Front was formed as an alliance of all four major religious parties (Mizrachi, Hapoel HaMizrachi, Agudat Yisrael and Poalei Agudat Yisrael), as well as the Union of Religious Independents, in order to run for the 1949 election, the first after independence. In the elections the list won 16 seats, making it the third largest in the Knesset. The initial allocation of seats between the parties saw Hapoel HaMizrachi take seven seats, Mizrachi take four, Poalei Agudat Yisrael three and Agudat Yisrael two. It joined David Ben-Gurion's Mapai party in forming the coalition of the first government of Israel, alongside the Progressive Party, the Sephardim and Oriental Communities and the Democratic List of Nazareth. However, the grouping created problems ...
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Haim-Moshe Shapira
Haim-Moshe Shapira ( he|חיים משה שפירא, 26 March 1902 – 16 July 1970) was a key Israeli politician in the early days of the state's existence. A signatory of Israel's declaration of independence, he served continuously as a minister from the country's foundation in 1948 until his death in 1970 apart from a brief spell in the late 1950s. Biography Haim-Moshe Shapira was born to Zalman Shapira and Rosa Krupnik in the Russian Empire in Grodno in what is today Belarus, Shapiro was educated in cheder and a yeshiva, where he organised a youth group called ''Bnei Zion'' (lit. ''Sons of Zion''). He worked in the Education and Culture department of the National Jewish Council in Kaunas (now in Lithuania), and in 1919 set up the ''Young Mizrachi'', which became a leading player in the religious Zionist youth movement in Lithuania. In 1922 he started work as a teacher at an ultra-orthodox school in Vilnius, and also served on the board of the Mizrachi group in the city. Between ...
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Provisional Government Of Israel
The provisional government of Israel ( he|הַמֶמְשָׁלָה הַזְמַנִּית, translit. ''HaMemshela HaZmanit'') was the temporary cabinet which governed the Jewish community in Mandatory Palestine, and later the newly established State of Israel, until the formation of the first government in March 1949 following the first Knesset elections in January that year. With the British Mandate of Palestine scheduled to come to an end on 15 May 1948, the governing body of the Jewish community, the Jewish National Council (JNC), on 2 March 1948 began work on organization of a Jewish provisional government. On 12 April 1948 it formed the Minhelet HaAm ( he|מנהלת העם, lit. ''People's Administration''), all of its members being drawn from Moetzet HaAm (''People's Council''), the temporary legislative body set up at the same time. The departmental structure of the JNC served as a basis for the interim government ministries. On 12 May, Minhelet HaAm convened to vote on w ...
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Yitzhak Gruenbaum
Yitzhak Gruenbaum ( pl|Izaak Grünbaum, Hebrew and Yiddish: יצחק גרינבוים, born 1879 died 1970) was a noted leader of the Zionist movement among Polish Jewry in the interwar period and of the Yishuv in Mandatory Palestine. Gruenbaum was the first Interior Minister of the State of Israel. Biography Yitzhak ("Itche") Gruenbaum was born in Warsaw, Poland. While a student of jurisprudence, he began activities on behalf of the Zionist movement and engaged in journalism. He served as editor of several periodicals widely circulated among Polish Jewry, including the Hebrew ''Ha-Zefirah'' and the Hebrew weekly ''Ha-Olam.'' Under his editorship, the Yiddish daily, ''Haynt,'' took on a pro-Zionist slant. In Poland, Gruenbaum headed the Radical Zionist faction, initially known in Poland as ''Al Hamishmar''. In 1919 he was elected to the Sejm (Polish parliament), where, together with Apolinary Hartglas, he organized a "Jewish bloc" that united most of the Jewish parties.Kapo_-_or_He ...
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