Magpie Lane, Oxford
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Magpie Lane, Oxford
Magpie Lane is a narrow historic lane in central Oxford, England. It leads south from the High Street where it is at its narrowest, now completely pedestrianised as a pavement, and north from the cobbled Merton Street. To the west is Oriel College (including the Rhodes building of 1910 at the northern end) and to the east is University College, two of the oldest Oxford colleges. On the northeast corner there is a 1902 house, now the Quod restaurant. A small cul-de-sac street, Kybald Street, leads off Magpie Lane at the southern end to the east, giving access to the rear of University College and Kybald Twychen, owned by Corpus Christi College. South from Merton Street, the lane continues as Grove Walk (a.k.a. Merton Grove or Grove Passage) between Merton College to the east and Corpus Christi College to the west, giving pedestrian access via railinged gates to Dead Man's Walk, Merton Field, and Christ Church Meadows. The building in the south-western corner of Merton Colle ...
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Merton College
Merton College (in full: The House or College of Scholars of Merton in the University of Oxford) is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England. Its foundation can be traced back to the 1260s when Walter de Merton, chancellor to Henry III and later to Edward I, first drew up statutes for an independent academic community and established endowments to support it. An important feature of de Merton's foundation was that this "college" was to be self-governing and the endowments were directly vested in the Warden and Fellows. By 1274, when Walter retired from royal service and made his final revisions to the college statutes, the community was consolidated at its present site in the south east corner of the city of Oxford, and a rapid programme of building commenced. The hall and the chapel and the rest of the front quad were complete before the end of the 13th century. Mob Quad, one of Merton's quadrangles, was constructed between 1288 and 1378, and ...
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Dead Man's Walk, Oxford
Dead Man's Walk (or Deadman's Walk) is a footpath running east–west in central Oxford, England, situated immediately to the south of Merton College and just outside the old city wall, with Corpus Christi College at the western end. To the north, Grove Walk connects with Merton Street through a gateway. Immediately to the south is Merton Field with Merton Walk connecting to the wide tree-lined Broad Walk, which runs parallel with Dead Man's Walk. Beyond that is Christ Church Meadow. History The walkway itself appears to be the route of medieval Jewish funeral processions. A procession would begin at the synagogue (near to where Tom Tower now stands) and proceed towards the Jewish burial ground (now the site of the University of Oxford Botanic Garden). Historical markers Near to the eastern end of the walkway is a plaque marking the first hot air balloon ascent in Britain, made by James Sadler (1753–1828). He ascended from Merton Field on 4 October 1784, landing nearby in ...
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Folk Music
Folk music is a music genre that includes traditional folk music and the contemporary genre that evolved from the former during the 20th-century folk revival. Some types of folk music may be called world music. Traditional folk music has been defined in several ways: as music transmitted orally, music with unknown composers, music that is played on traditional instruments, music about cultural or national identity, music that changes between generations (folk process), music associated with a people's folklore, or music performed by custom over a long period of time. It has been contrasted with commercial and classical styles. The term originated in the 19th century, but folk music extends beyond that. Starting in the mid-20th century, a new form of popular folk music evolved from traditional folk music. This process and period is called the (second) folk revival and reached a zenith in the 1960s. This form of music is sometimes called contemporary folk music or folk rev ...
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Magpie Lane
Magpie Lane is an English folk group, based in Oxford, England. The musicians of Magpie Lane first came together in the winter of 1992–93 to record ''The Oxford Ramble'', a collection of songs and tunes from, or about, Oxfordshire. Originally conceived as a one-off recording project, the success of ''The Oxford Ramble'' and early concerts and appearances in Oxford and further afield led to the release of a second CD, ''Speed the Plough'', a year later. Further recordings followed, celebrating seasonal folk customs of the British Isles: a collection of traditional Festive songs and tunes in ''Wassail: a Country Christmas''; and ''Jack-in-the-Green,'' which celebrates customs around May Day and Midsummer. In 2000, the band were asked to record a companion album for ''A Taste of Ale'', a book by the author and folksong scholar, Roy Palmer. This album was one of two to feature Benji Kirkpatrick on vocals and string instruments. The band have continued to release albums and perf ...
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European Magpie
The Eurasian magpie or common magpie (''Pica pica'') is a resident breeding bird throughout the northern part of the Eurasian continent. It is one of several birds in the crow family (corvids) designated magpies, and belongs to the Holarctic radiation of "monochrome" magpies. In Europe, "magpie" is used by English speakers as a synonym for the Eurasian magpie: the only other magpie in Europe is the Iberian magpie (''Cyanopica cooki''), which is limited to the Iberian Peninsula. The Eurasian magpie is one of the most intelligent birds, and it is believed to be one of the most intelligent of all non-human animals. The expansion of its nidopallium is approximately the same in its relative size as the brain of chimpanzees, gorillas, orangutans and humans. It is the only bird known to pass the mirror test, along with very few other non-avian species. Taxonomy and systematics The magpie was described and illustrated by Swiss naturalist Conrad Gessner in his '' Historiae animaliu ...
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John Speed
John Speed (1551 or 1552 – 28 July 1629) was an English cartographer, chronologer and historian of Cheshire origins.S. Bendall, 'Speed, John (1551/2–1629), historian and cartographer', ''Oxford Dictionary of National Biography'' (OUP 2004/2008); superseding A.F. Pollard, 'Speed, John (?1552-1629), historian and cartographer', ''Dictionary of National Biography'' (1885-1900)vol. 53 The son of a citizen and Merchant Taylor in London,"Life of John Speed", ''The Hibernian Magazine, Or, Compendium of Entertaining Knowledge'', July 1782p. 348(Google). he rose from his family occupation to accept the task of drawing together and revising the histories, topographies and maps of the Kingdoms of Great Britain as an exposition of the union of their monarchies in the person of King James I and VI. He accomplished this with remarkable success, with the support and assistance of the leading antiquarian scholars of his generation. He drew upon and improved the shire maps of Christopher ...
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Witney
Witney is a market town on the River Windrush in West Oxfordshire in the county of Oxfordshire, England. It is west of Oxford. The place-name "Witney" is derived from the Old English for "Witta's island". The earliest known record of it is as ''Wyttannige'' in a Saxon charter of 969. The Domesday Book of 1086 records it as ''Witenie''. Notable buildings The Church of England parish church of St Mary the Virgin was originally Norman. The north porch and north aisle were added in this style late in the 12th century, and survived a major rebuilding in about 1243. In this rebuilding the present chancel, transepts, tower and spire were added and the nave was remodelled, all in the Early English style. In the 14th century a number of side chapels and some of the present windows were added in the Decorated style. In the 15th century the south transept was extended and the present west window of the nave were added in the Perpendicular style. The tower has a peal of eight b ...
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Robert Boyd Publications
Robert Boyd Publications is a book publishing company based in Witney, Oxfordshire, England. It concentrates on books covering the history of Oxfordshire in general and Oxford in particular, including "''The Changing Faces of ...''" book series. They have published 44 works between 1994 and 2003. Authors they have worked for include Carole Newbigging, Julie Kennedy and Ann Spokes Symonds Ann Hazel Spokes Symonds (10 November 1925 – 27 December 2019) was a British author and former Lord Mayor of Oxford. Spokes was born in November 1925, the daughter of Peter Spencer Spokes and Lilla Clayton. Her father founded the Museum of Oxf .... References External links Robert Boyd Publications website Companies with year of establishment missing Book publishing companies of England Companies based in Oxfordshire Defunct companies based in London {{England-company-stub ...
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Gropecunt Lane
Gropecunt Lane () was a street name found in English towns and cities during the Middle Ages, believed to be a reference to the prostitution centred on those areas; it was normal practice for a medieval street name to reflect the street's function or the economic activity taking place within it. Gropecunt, the earliest known use of which is in about 1230, appears to have been derived as a compound of the words ''grope'' and '' cunt''. Streets with that name were often in the busiest parts of medieval towns and cities, and at least one appears to have been an important thoroughfare. Although the name was once common throughout England, changes in attitude resulted in its replacement by more innocuous versions such as Grape Lane. A variation of Gropecunt was last recorded as a street name in 1561. Toponymy Variations include Gropecunte, Gropecountelane, Gropecontelane, Groppecountelane and Gropekuntelane. There were once many such street names in England, but all have now be ...
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Christ Church Meadows, Oxford
Christ Church Meadow is a flood-meadow and popular walking and picnic spot in Oxford, England. Roughly triangular in shape, it is bounded by the River Thames (the stretch through Oxford being known as "The Isis"), the River Cherwell, and Christ Church. The meadow provides access to many of the college boathouses, which are on an island at the confluence of the two rivers. The lower sections of the meadow, close to the Thames, are grazed by cattle (including Longhorn cows) while the upper sections have sports fields. Broad Walk is at the northern edge with Merton Field to the north and Merton College, dominated by the tower of Merton College Chapel, beyond that. Christ Church Meadow is owned by Christ Church, and is thus the private property of the college; however, access is allowed during the day. Access starts very early to allow rowers to go to the boathouses. Eights Week and Torpids, Oxford University's two main rowing events, and Christ Church Regatta are held o ...
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Merton Field
Merton Field is a grass playing field north of the main part of Christ Church Meadow and south of Merton College in central Oxford, England. To the west are Merton Walk and Christ Church, one of the Oxford colleges. To the east is the University of Oxford Botanic Garden. To the south is Broad Walk a wide path on the northern edge of Christ Church Meadow. To the north, Dead Man's Walk skirts the edge of Merton Field following the line of the old city wall and Grove Walk leads to Merton Street, between Corpus Christi College and Merton College. The tower of Merton College Chapel dominates the view north from Merton Field. Near to the eastern end of Dead Man's Walk is a plaque marking the first hot air balloon ascent in Britain, made by James Sadler (1753–1828). He ascended from Merton Field on 4 October 1783, landing in Woodeaton to the northeast of Oxford. Gallery File:ChCh Meadow.JPG, View from the meadow, looking across the Merton Field sports fields towards Ch ...
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Grove Walk
Grove Walk (aka Merton Grove and Grove Passage) is a short historic leafy walkway running north–south in central Oxford, England, situated on land between Merton College to the east and Corpus Christi College to the west. It provides one of the entrances to Christ Church Meadow from the north. To the north, Grove Walk connects with Merton Street through a gateway surrounded by railings. On the other side of Merton Street, the route continues as the narrow medieval Magpie Lane. To the south it passes through what used to be the city wall and leads to Dead Man's Walk on Merton Field. Beyond that via Merton Walk to the wide Broad Walk is the main part of Christ Church Meadow. In 1701, Corpus Christi College attempted to acquire some of this strip of land, but this was resisted. To the south, the first hot air balloon A hot air balloon is a lighter-than-air aircraft consisting of a bag, called an envelope, which contains heated air. Suspended beneath is a gondola or ...
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