Magistrates' Courts Act 1952
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Magistrates' Courts Act 1952
The Magistrates' Courts Act 1952 (15 & 16 Geo 6 & 1 Eliz c 55) was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom which related to magistrates' courts. It was repealed by section 154 of, and Schedule 9 to, the Magistrates' Courts Act 1980. Section 1 Section 1 did not apply to a committal for trial under section 1 of the Criminal Justice Act 1967 Section 24(1) of the Criminal Justice Act 1967 restricted the issue of a warrant under this section. Section 1(2)(e) was inserted by section 56 of, and paragraph 34(2) of Schedule 8 to, the Courts Act 1971. Section 1(4) was repealed by section 56 of, and Part IV of Schedule 11 to the Courts Act 1971. Section 4 Section 4(2) provided that there was no obligation on examining justices to sit in open court. It was repealed by sections 6(2) and 103(2) of, and Part I of Schedule 7 to, the Criminal Justice Act 1967. Section 9 Section 9(2) made special provision about offences dealt with by virtue of section 11 of the Criminal Justice Act ...
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Short Title
In certain jurisdictions, including the United Kingdom and other Westminster-influenced jurisdictions (such as Canada or Australia), as well as the United States and the Philippines, primary legislation has both a short title and a long title. The long title (properly, the title in some jurisdictions) is the formal title appearing at the head of a statute (such as an act of Parliament or of Congress) or other legislative instrument. The long title is intended to provide a summarised description of the purpose or scope of the instrument. Like other descriptive components of an act (such as the preamble, section headings, side notes, and short title), the long title seldom affects the operative provisions of an act, except where the operative provisions are unclear or ambiguous and the long title provides a clear statement of the legislature's intention. The short title is the formal name by which legislation may by law be cited. It contrasts with the long title which, while usual ...
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Registered Medical Practitioner
A physician (American English), medical practitioner (English in the Commonwealth of Nations, Commonwealth English), medical doctor, or simply doctor, is a health professional who practices medicine, which is concerned with promoting, maintaining or restoring health through the Medical education, study, Medical diagnosis, diagnosis, prognosis and therapy, treatment of disease, injury, and other physical and mental impairments. Physicians may focus their practice on certain disease categories, types of patients, and methods of treatment—known as Specialty (medicine), specialities—or they may assume responsibility for the provision of continuing and comprehensive medical care to individuals, families, and communities—known as general practitioner, general practice. Medical practice properly requires both a detailed knowledge of the Discipline (academia), academic disciplines, such as anatomy and physiology, pathophysiology, underlying diseases and their treatment—the ...
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1952 In England
Year 195 ( CXCV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Scrapula and Clemens (or, less frequently, year 948 ''Ab urbe condita''). The denomination 195 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years. Events By place Roman Empire * Emperor Septimius Severus has the Roman Senate deify the previous emperor Commodus, in an attempt to gain favor with the family of Marcus Aurelius. * King Vologases V and other eastern princes support the claims of Pescennius Niger. The Roman province of Mesopotamia rises in revolt with Parthian support. Severus marches to Mesopotamia to battle the Parthians. * The Roman province of Syria is divided and the role of Antioch is diminished. The Romans annexed the Syrian cities of Edessa and Nisibis. Severus re-establish his head ...
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Acts Of The Parliament Of The United Kingdom Concerning England And Wales
The Acts of the Apostles ( grc-koi, Πράξεις Ἀποστόλων, ''Práxeis Apostólōn''; la, Actūs Apostolōrum) is the fifth book of the New Testament; it tells of the founding of the Christian Church and the spread of its message to the Roman Empire. It gives an account of the ministry and activity of Christ's apostles in Jerusalem and other regions, after Christ's death, resurrection, and ascension. Acts and the Gospel of Luke make up a two-part work, Luke–Acts, by the same anonymous author. It is usually dated to around 80–90 AD, although some scholars suggest 90–110. The first part, the Gospel of Luke, tells how God fulfilled his plan for the world's salvation through the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus of Nazareth. Acts continues the story of Christianity in the 1st century, beginning with the ascension of Jesus to Heaven. The early chapters, set in Jerusalem, describe the Day of Pentecost (the coming of the Holy Spirit) and the growth of the ...
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United Kingdom Acts Of Parliament 1952
United may refer to: Places * United, Pennsylvania, an unincorporated community * United, West Virginia, an unincorporated community Arts and entertainment Films * ''United'' (2003 film), a Norwegian film * ''United'' (2011 film), a BBC Two film Literature * ''United!'' (novel), a 1973 children's novel by Michael Hardcastle Music * United (band), Japanese thrash metal band formed in 1981 Albums * ''United'' (Commodores album), 1986 * ''United'' (Dream Evil album), 2006 * ''United'' (Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell album), 1967 * ''United'' (Marian Gold album), 1996 * ''United'' (Phoenix album), 2000 * ''United'' (Woody Shaw album), 1981 Songs * "United" (Judas Priest song), 1980 * "United" (Prince Ital Joe and Marky Mark song), 1994 * "United" (Robbie Williams song), 2000 * "United", a song by Danish duo Nik & Jay featuring Lisa Rowe Television * ''United'' (TV series), a 1990 BBC Two documentary series * ''United!'', a soap opera that aired on BBC One from 1965-19 ...
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Halsbury's Statutes
''Halsbury's Statutes of England and Wales'' (commonly referred to as ''Halsbury's Statutes'') provides updated texts of every Public General Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, Measure of the Welsh Assembly, or Church of England Measure currently in force in England and Wales (and to various extents in Scotland and Northern Ireland), as well as a number of private and local Acts, with detailed annotations to each section and Schedule of each Act. It incorporates the effects of new Acts of Parliament and secondary legislation into existing legislation to provide a consolidated "as amended" text of the current statute book. ''Halsbury's Statutes'' was created in 1929. The full title of this work was ''The Complete Statutes of England Classified and Annotated in Continuation of Halsbury’s Laws of England and for ready reference entitled Halsbury’s Statutes of England''. As indicated by the title, the new work was to be a companion to ''Halsbury’s Laws of England'' ...
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Magistrates' Courts Act
Magistrates' Courts Act (with its variations) is a stock short title used for legislation in the United Kingdom relating to magistrates' courts. The Bill for an Act with this short title may have been known as a Magistrates' Courts Bill during its passage through Parliament. Magistrates' Courts Acts may be a generic name either for legislation bearing that short title or for all legislation which relates to magistrates courts. List United Kingdom :The Magistrates' Courts Act 1952 (15 & 16 Geo.6 & 1 Eliz.2 c.55) :The Magistrates' Courts Act 1957 (5 & 6 Eliz.2 c.29) :The Magistrates' Courts (Appeals From Binding Over Orders) Act 1956 (4 & 5 Eliz.2 c.44) :The Metropolitan Magistrates' Courts Act 1959 (7 & 8 Eliz.2 c.45) :The Domestic Proceedings and Magistrates' Courts Act 1978 (c.22) :The Magistrates' Courts Act 1980 (c.43) :The Police and Magistrates' Courts Act 1994 (c.29) :The Magistrates' Courts (Procedure) Act 1998 (c.15) Northern Ireland :The Magistrates' Courts Act ...
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Criminal Justice Act 1948
The Criminal Justice Act 1948 () is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Overview It is "one of the most important measures relating to the reform of the criminal law and its administration". It abolished: * penal servitude, hard labour and prison divisions for England and Wales (s.1). *state punishment of whipping there and in Scotland (s.2). * right of peers to be tried in the House of Lords (s.30).s. 30
Criminal Justice Act 1948 Other substantive provisions still in force are: * s. 27, as amended by (in particular) the Children and Young Persons Act 1969, which provides for remand of defendants between 18 and 20 years old to remand centres, and s. 49, which regulates them; * s. 31 ...
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Summary Jurisdiction (Appeals) Act 1933
Summary jurisdiction, in the widest sense of the phrase, in English law includes the power asserted by courts of record to deal ''brevi manu'' with contempts of court without the intervention of a jury. Probably the power was originally exercisable only when the fact was notorious, i.e. done in presence of the court. But it has long been exercised as to extra curial contempts. The term is also applied to the special powers given by statute or rules to the High Court of Justice and to county courts for dealing with certain classes of causes or matters by methods more simple and expeditious than the ordinary procedure of an action. But the phrase in modern times is applied almost exclusively forms of jurisdiction exercised by justices of the peace out of general or quarter sessions, and without the assistance. Overview Ever since the creation of the office of justice of the peace the tendency of English legislation has been to enable them to deal with minor offences without a jury ...
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Assizes Relief Act 1889
The courts of assize, or assizes (), were periodic courts held around England and Wales until 1972, when together with the quarter sessions they were abolished by the Courts Act 1971 and replaced by a single permanent Crown Court. The assizes exercised both civil and criminal jurisdiction, though most of their work was on the criminal side. The assizes heard the most serious cases, which were committed to it by the quarter sessions (local county courts held four times per year), while the more minor offences were dealt with summarily by justices of the peace in petty sessions (also known as magistrates' courts). The word ''assize'' refers to the sittings or sessions (Old French ''assises'') of the judges, known as "justices of assize", who were judges who travelled across the seven circuits of England and Wales on commissions of "oyer and terminer", setting up court and summoning juries at the various assize towns. Etymology Middle English <

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Criminal Law Amendment Act 1867
In ordinary language, a crime is an unlawful act punishable by a state or other authority. The term ''crime'' does not, in modern criminal law, have any simple and universally accepted definition,Farmer, Lindsay: "Crime, definitions of", in Cane and Conoghan (editors), ''The New Oxford Companion to Law'', Oxford University Press, 2008 (), p. 263Google Books). though statutory definitions have been provided for certain purposes. The most popular view is that crime is a category created by law; in other words, something is a crime if declared as such by the relevant and applicable law. One proposed definition is that a crime or offence (or criminal offence) is an act harmful not only to some individual but also to a community, society, or the state ("a public wrong"). Such acts are forbidden and punishable by law. The notion that acts such as murder, rape, and theft are to be prohibited exists worldwide. What precisely is a criminal offence is defined by the criminal law of each r ...
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