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Jingning She Autonomous County
Jingning She Autonomous County () is an autonomous county for the She people, under the jurisdiction of the prefecture-level city of Lishui in the south of Zhejiang Province, China. The county covers an area of and in 1999 had a population of 175,484. The postal code for the county is 323500. The government for the autonomous county is located at #19 Qianxi Road. Administration The county administers 2 subdistricts, 4 towns, and 15 townships. Subdistricts () * Hongxing () * Hexi () Towns () * Bohai () * Dongkeng () * Yingchuan () * Shawan () Townships () * Bohai () * Chengzhao () * Meiqi () * Zhengkeng () * Daji () * Jingnan () * Yanxi () * Luci () * Wutong () * Biaoxi () * Maoyang () * Qiulu () * Dadi () * Jiadi () * Jiulong () References External links Official government site Category:Autonomous counties of the People's Republic of China Category:Lishui {{Zhejiang-geo-stub ...
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Postal Code Of China
Postal codes in the People's Republic of China () are postal codes used by China Post for the delivery of letters and goods within mainland China. China Post uses a six-digit all-numerical system with four tiers: the first tier, composed of the first two digits, show the province, province-equivalent municipality, or autonomous region; the second tier, composed of the third digit, shows the postal zone within the province, municipality or autonomous region; the fourth digit serves as the third tier, which shows the postal office within prefectures or prefecture-level cities; the last two digits are the fourth tier, which indicates the specific mailing area for delivery. The range 000000–009999 was originally marked for Taiwan (The Republic of China) but is not used because it not under the control of the People's Republic of China. Mail to ROC is treated as international mail, and uses postal codes set forth by Chunghwa Post. Codes starting from 999 are the internal codes used ...
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Prefecture-level City
A road sign shows distance to the "Huangshi urban area" () rather than simply "Yangxin County from the neighboring [[Xianning">Yangxin County, Hubei">Yangxin County from the neighboring [[Xianning), but still from the Huangshi main urban area. A prefectural-level municipality (), prefectural-level city or prefectural city; formerly known as province-administrated city () from 1949 to 1983, is an administrative division of the People's Republic of China (PRC), ranking below a province and above a county in China's administrative structure. Prefectural level cities form the second level of the administrative structure (alongside prefectures, leagues and autonomous prefectures). Administrative chiefs (mayors) of prefectural level cities generally have the same rank as a division chief () of a national ministry. Since the 1980s, most former prefectures have been renamed into prefectural level cities. A prefectural level city is a "city" () and "prefecture" () that have been merged i ...
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National Bureau Of Statistics Of The People's Republic Of China
The National Bureau of Statistics (), abbreviated as NBS, is an deputy-cabinet level agency directly under the State Council of the People's Republic of China. It is responsible for collection, investigation, research and publication of statistics concerning the nation's economy, population and other aspects of the society. Ning Jizhe is the commissioner of the bureau since 2016. Responsibilities The bureau's authority and responsibilities are defined in ''China's Statistics Law''. It is responsible for the research of the nation's overall statistics and oversee the operations of its local counterparts. Organizations The bureau is led by a commissioner, with several deputy commissioners (currently four), a chief methodologist, a chief economist, and a chief information officer. It is composed of 18 departments, oversees 12 affiliated institutions and manages 32 survey organizations stationed in respective provinces. It also operates China Statistics Press. The national bureau ...
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Townships Of The People's Republic Of China
Townships (), formally township-level divisions (), are the basic level (fourth-level administrative units) of political divisions in China. They are similar to municipalities and communes in other countries and in turn may contain village committees and villages. In 1995 there were 29,502 townships and 17,532 towns (a total of 47,034 township-level divisions) in China. Much like other levels of government in mainland China, the township's governance is divided between the Communist Party Township Secretary, and the "county magistrate" (). The township party secretary, along with the township's party committee, determines policy. The magistrate is in charge of administering the daily affairs of government and executing policies as determined by the party committee. A township official is the lowest-level ranked official in the civil service hierarchy; in practice, however, the township party secretary and magistrate can amass high levels of personal power. A township government is ...
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Towns Of The People's Republic Of China
When referring to political divisions of China, town is the standard English translation of the Chinese (traditional: ; ). The Constitution of the People's Republic of China currently classifies towns as third-level administrative units, along with townships () and ethnic minority townships (The State Council, 2014). A township is typically smaller in population and more remote than a town (''zhèn''). left|In the central urban area of Longgang Town (), a typical town of Yangxin County, Hubei Similarly to a higher-level administrative units, the borders of a town (''zhen'') would typically include an urban core (what one would call a "town" in Europe or America - a small town with the population on the order of 10,000 people), as well as rural area with some villages (, or ). Towns in China are relatively small in size and in population compared to cities, but those with particular characteristics can enjoy great popularity among tourists. For example, the ancient town of Feng ...
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Subdistricts Of The People's Republic Of China
A subdistrict ()' is one of the smaller administrative divisions of China. It is a form of township-level division which is typically part of a larger urban area, as opposed to a discrete town surrounded by rural areas, or a rural township known as a xiang (乡). In general, urban areas are divided into subdistricts and a subdistrict is sub-divided into several residential communities or neighbourhoods as well as into villagers' groups (居民区/居住区, 小区/社区, 村民小组). The subdistrict's administrative agency is the subdistrict office ()"【街道办事处】 jiēdào bànshìchù 市辖区、不设区的市的人民政府派出机关。在上一级政府领导下,负责本辖区内的社区服务、经济发展、社会治安等工作。" or simply the jiedao ban (街道办, jiēdào bàn). Because of the influence of the literal meaning of the Chinese word for 'subdistrict' (street 道, jiedao, the term is prone to alternative translations like 'street co ...
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Zhejiang Province
Zhejiang (, formerly romanized as Chekiang) is an eastern, coastal province of the People's Republic of China. Its capital and largest city is Hangzhou. Zhejiang is bordered by Jiangsu and Shanghai to the north, Anhui to the northwest, Jiangxi to the west and Fujian to the south. To the east is the East China Sea, beyond which lies the Ryukyu Islands. The population of Zhejiang stands at 57 million, the 10th highest among China. Other notable cities include Ningbo and Wenzhou. It has been called 'the backbone of China' due to being a major driving force in the Chinese economy and being the birthplace of several notable persons, including the Chinese Nationalist leader Chiang Kai-shek and entrepreneur Jack Ma. Zhejiang consists of 90 counties (incl. county-level cities and districts). The area of Zhejiang was controlled by the Kingdom of Yue during the Spring and Autumn period. The Qin Empire later annexed it in 222 BC. Under the late Ming dynasty and the Qing dynasty that fol ...
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Lishui, Zhejiang
Lishui () is a prefecture-level city in the southwest of Zhejiang province, People's Republic of China. It borders Quzhou, Jinhua and Taizhou to the north, Wenzhou to the southeast, and the province of Fujian to the southwest. The name of the city literally means "Beautiful Waters." History Lishui has a very long history, for during the Liangzhu culture period 4000 years ago, there were tribes living in the area. In 589, a prefecture called Chuzhou was established by the Sui dynasty with Kuocang, Songyang, Linhai, Yongjia, Angu and Lechen counties under its jurisdiction. Three years later, the prefecture's name was changed to Kuozhou and then to Yongjia County in 607. The name was changed back to Kuozhou in 621 during the Tang dynasty, to Jinyun County in the first year of the Tianbao era (742) and back to Kuozhou in the first year of Qianyuan Era (758). In 779, during the Tang dynasty, it was renamed Lishui County. The name of the area was changed again in the year 1276 during ...
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She People
The She people (; Shehua: ; Cantonese: , Fuzhou: ) are an ethnic group in China. They form one of the 56 ethnic groups officially recognized by the People's Republic of China. The She are the largest ethnic minority in Fujian, Zhejiang, and Jiangxi Provinces. They are also present in the provinces of Anhui and Guangdong. Some descendants of the She also exist amongst the Hakka minority in Taiwan. Languages Today, over 400,000 She people of Fujian, Zhejiang, and Jiangxi provinces speak Shehua, an unclassified Chinese variety that has been heavily influenced by Hakka Chinese. There are approximately 1,200 She people in Guangdong province who speak a Hmong–Mien language called She, also called ''Ho Ne'' meaning "mountain people" (). Some said they were descendants of Dongyi, Nanman or Yue peoples. ''Shēhuà'' () should not be confused with (), also known as Ho Ne, which is a Hmong-Mien language spoken in east-central Guangdong. Shehua and Sheyu speakers have separate histories ...
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Autonomous County
Autonomous counties and autonomous banners are county-level autonomous administrative divisions of China. The two are essentially identical except in name. There are 117 autonomous counties and three autonomous banners. The latter are found in Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region and the former are found everywhere else. Maps List History Former autonomous counties of China See also * External links ChinaDataOnline.org website {{authority control C * Category:Counties of China China, PRC Autonomous ...
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Autonomous County
Autonomous counties and autonomous banners are county-level autonomous administrative divisions of China. The two are essentially identical except in name. There are 117 autonomous counties and three autonomous banners. The latter are found in Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region and the former are found everywhere else. Maps List History Former autonomous counties of China See also * External links ChinaDataOnline.org website {{authority control C * Category:Counties of China China, PRC Autonomous ...
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China Standard Time
The time in China follows a single standard time offset of UTC+08:00 (eight hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time), despite China spanning five geographical time zones. The official national standard time is called ''Beijing Time'' (BJT, ) domestically and ''China Standard Time'' (CST) internationally. Daylight saving time has not been observed since 1991. History In the 1870s, the Shanghai Xujiahui Observatory was constructed by a French Catholic missionary. In 1880s officials in Shanghai French Concession started to provide a time announcement service using the Shanghai Mean Solar Time provided by the aforementioned observatory for ships into and out of Shanghai. By the end of 19th century, the time standard provided by the observatory had been switched to UTC+08:00. The practice has spread to other coastal ports, and in 1902 the "Coastal Time" was proposed to be the universal time zone for all the coastal ports in China. However, the time zone for the rest of China remain ...
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Lishui
Lishui () is a prefecture-level city in the southwest of Zhejiang province, People's Republic of China. It borders Quzhou, Jinhua and Taizhou to the north, Wenzhou to the southeast, and the province of Fujian to the southwest. The name of the city literally means "Beautiful Waters." History Lishui has a very long history, for during the Liangzhu culture period 4000 years ago, there were tribes living in the area. In 589, a prefecture called Chuzhou was established by the Sui dynasty with Kuocang, Songyang, Linhai, Yongjia, Angu and Lechen counties under its jurisdiction. Three years later, the prefecture's name was changed to Kuozhou and then to Yongjia County in 607. The name was changed back to Kuozhou in 621 during the Tang dynasty, to Jinyun County in the first year of the Tianbao era (742) and back to Kuozhou in the first year of Qianyuan Era (758). In 779, during the Tang dynasty, it was renamed Lishui County. The name of the area was changed again in the year 1276 during ...
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Prefecture-level City
A road sign shows distance to the "Huangshi urban area" () rather than simply "Yangxin County from the neighboring [[Xianning">Yangxin County, Hubei">Yangxin County from the neighboring [[Xianning), but still from the Huangshi main urban area. A prefectural-level municipality (), prefectural-level city or prefectural city; formerly known as province-administrated city () from 1949 to 1983, is an administrative division of the People's Republic of China (PRC), ranking below a province and above a county in China's administrative structure. Prefectural level cities form the second level of the administrative structure (alongside prefectures, leagues and autonomous prefectures). Administrative chiefs (mayors) of prefectural level cities generally have the same rank as a division chief () of a national ministry. Since the 1980s, most former prefectures have been renamed into prefectural level cities. A prefectural level city is a "city" () and "prefecture" () that have been merged i ...
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Zhejiang
Zhejiang (, formerly romanized as Chekiang) is an eastern, coastal province of the People's Republic of China. Its capital and largest city is Hangzhou. Zhejiang is bordered by Jiangsu and Shanghai to the north, Anhui to the northwest, Jiangxi to the west and Fujian to the south. To the east is the East China Sea, beyond which lies the Ryukyu Islands. The population of Zhejiang stands at 57 million, the 10th highest among China. Other notable cities include Ningbo and Wenzhou. It has been called 'the backbone of China' due to being a major driving force in the Chinese economy and being the birthplace of several notable persons, including the Chinese Nationalist leader Chiang Kai-shek and entrepreneur Jack Ma. Zhejiang consists of 90 counties (incl. county-level cities and districts). The area of Zhejiang was controlled by the Kingdom of Yue during the Spring and Autumn period. The Qin Empire later annexed it in 222 BC. Under the late Ming dynasty and the Qing dynasty that fol ...
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