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Henry McAleavy
Henry McAleavy (1911/1912–1968) was an English sinologist, Reader in Oriental Laws at the School of Oriental and African Studies.'Mr Henry McAleavy: Student of China', ''The Times'', 28 October 1968 Life Henry McAleavy was born to an Irish Roman Catholic working-class family in Manchester. His father died when he was a child, and his mother brought him up while working in a cotton mill. After leaving school he worked as a clerk in a solicitor's office before getting a place at Manchester University to read classics. He went on to study Chinese at Trinity College, Cambridge. From 1935 he taught English in central China and Peking. In 1940 he joined the information department of the British Embassy in Shanghai. In 1941 he married Ayako, a writer for Japanese newspapers. After the war he joined the School of Oriental and African Studies. In 1960 he went to Japan on study leave, acquiring material on modern Japanese and Chinese history from the Japanese viewpoint.Yin C. Liu, 'Henry McA ...
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School Of Oriental And African Studies
SOAS University of London (; the School of Oriental and African Studies) is a public research university in London, England, and a constituent college of the federal University of London. Founded in 1916, SOAS is located in the Bloomsbury area of central London. SOAS is one of the world's leading institutions for the study of Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. It also houses the Brunei Gallery, which hosts a programme of changing contemporary and historical exhibitions from Asia, Africa and the Middle East with the aim to present and promote cultures from these regions. SOAS is divided into three faculties: Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Faculty of Languages and Cultures and Faculty of Law and Social Sciences. It is home to the SOAS School of Law which is one of leading law schools in the UK. The university offers around 350 undergraduate bachelor's degree combinations, more than 100 one-year master's degrees and PhD programmes in nearly every department. The university has a ...
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The Times
''The Times'' is a British daily national newspaper based in London. It began in 1785 under the title ''The Daily Universal Register'', adopting its current name on 1 January 1788. ''The Times'' and its sister paper ''The Sunday Times'' (founded in 1821) are published by Times Newspapers, since 1981 a subsidiary of News UK, in turn wholly owned by News Corp. ''The Times'' and ''The Sunday Times'', which do not share editorial staff, were founded independently, and have only had common ownership since 1966. ''The Times'' is the first newspaper to have borne that name, lending it to numerous other papers around the world, such as ''The Times of India'' and ''The New York Times''. In countries where these other titles are popular, the newspaper is often referred to as , or as , although the newspaper is of national scope and distribution. ''The Times'' had an average daily circulation of 417,298 in January 2019; in the same period, ''The Sunday Times'' had an average weekly circul ...
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Manchester
Manchester () is a city and metropolitan borough in Greater Manchester, England. The city has the country’s fifth-largest population at 547,627 (as of 2018) and lies within the United Kingdom's second-most populous urban area, with a population of 2.7 million, third most-populous county, at around 2.8 million, and third-most populous metropolitan area, with a population of 3.3 million. It is fringed by the Cheshire Plain to the south, the Pennines to the north and east, and an arc of towns with which it forms a continuous conurbation. The local authority for the city is Manchester City Council. The recorded history of Manchester began with the civilian settlement associated with the Roman fort of ''Mamucium'' or ''Mancunium'', which was established in about AD 79 on a sandstone bluff near the confluence of the rivers Medlock and Irwell. Although historically and traditionally a part of Lancashire, areas of Cheshire south of the River Mersey were incorporated into Man ...
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Manchester University
| mottoeng = Knowledge, Wisdom, Humanity | established = 2004 – University of Manchester Predecessor institutions: 1956 – UMIST (as university college; university 1994) 1904 – Victoria University of Manchester 1880 – Victoria University 1851 – Owens College 1824 – Manchester Mechanics' Institute | endowment = £220.5 million | budget = £1092.6 million | chancellor = Lemn Sissay MBE |head_label= President and Vice-Chancellor | head = Dame Nancy Rothwell | academic_staff = 3,849 | students = () | undergrad = () | postgrad = () | city = Manchester | country = England, United Kingdom | campus = Urban and suburban | colours = Manchester Purple Manchester Yellow | free_label = Scarf | free = | website = | logo = UniOfManchesterLogo.svg | affiliations = Universities Research Association Sutton 30 Russell Group EUA N8 Group NWUA ACUUniversities UK The University of Manchester is a public research university in Manchester, England, formed in 2004 by the merger of th ...
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Trinity College, Cambridge
Trinity College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge in England. The college was founded in 1546 by King Henry VIII. Trinity is one of the oldest, largest and most prestigious colleges in Cambridge with the largest financial endowment of any college at either Cambridge or Oxford. Trinity is renowned for having some of the most distinctive architecture within Cambridge, with its Great Court reputed to be the largest enclosed courtyard in Europe. Academically, Trinity performs exceptionally as measured by the Tompkins Table (the annual unofficial league table of Cambridge colleges), coming in first from 2011 to 2017, with 42.5% of undergraduates obtaining a first in 2019. Members of Trinity have won 34 Nobel Prizes out of the 121 won by members of Cambridge University, the highest number of any college at either Oxford or Cambridge. Members of the college have won five Fields Medals in mathematics (of the seven awarded to members of British universities) and on ...
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Shanghai
Shanghai (, , Standard Mandarin pronunciation: ) is one of the four direct-administered municipalities of the People's Republic of China, governed by the State Council. The city is located on the southern estuary of the Yangtze River, with the Huangpu River flowing through it. With a population of 24.28 million , it is the most populous urban area in China and the third most populous city proper in the world. Shanghai is a global center for finance, research, technology, manufacturing, and transportation, and the Port of Shanghai is the world's busiest container port. Originally a fishing village and market town, Shanghai grew in importance in the 19th century due to trade and its favorable port location. The city was one of five treaty ports forced open to foreign trade after the First Opium War. The Shanghai International Settlement and the French Concession were subsequently established. The city then flourished, becoming a primary commercial and financial hub of the Asi ...
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Sai Jinhua
Sai Jinhua (; "Prettier Than Golden Flower";Chang, Jung. ''Empress Dowager Cixi: The Concubine Who Launched Modern China'' (eBook). Alfred A. Knopf, New York, 2013. eBook . p. 118. "Her minister to Berlin, Hung Jun, was quite the opposite of Guo.. - Hardcover circa 1872-1936Hu, Ying, p53) was a Chinese courtesan who became the acquaintance of Alfred von Waldersee.Zhang, Wenxian, p423 Her real family name was Cao. Sometimes she said her family name was Zhao. During her career as a courtesan she used the names Fu Caiyun (), Sai Jinhua, and Cao Menglan (). Her art name (''hao'') was Weizhao Lingfei (). Some people referred to her as Sai Erye (, "Second Master Sai").Wan, p182 Wenxian Zhang, author of an encyclopedia article on Sai Jinhua, wrote that she "was regarded by some as a cross-cultural courtesan." Wan Xianchu, an author of an encyclopedia article on Sai Jinhua, wrote that "regardless of whether Sai Jinhua's role in China's foreign relations may have been exaggerated and despit ...
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1912 Births
Year 191 (CXCI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Apronianus and Bradua (or, less frequently, year 944 ''Ab urbe condita''). The denomination 191 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years. Events By place Parthia * King Vologases IV of Parthia dies after a 44-year reign, and is succeeded by his son Vologases V. China * A coalition of Chinese warlords from the east of Hangu Pass launches a punitive campaign against the warlord Dong Zhuo, who seized control of the central government in 189, and held the figurehead Emperor Xian hostage. After suffering some defeats against the coalition forces, Dong Zhuo forcefully relocates the imperial capital from Luoyang to Chang'an. Before leaving, Dong Zhuo orders his troops to loot the tombs of the Han empero ...
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Year Of Birth Uncertain
A year is the orbital period of a planetary body, for example, the Earth, moving in its orbit around the Sun. Due to the Earth's axial tilt, the course of a year sees the passing of the seasons, marked by change in weather, the hours of daylight, and, consequently, vegetation and soil fertility. In temperate and subpolar regions around the planet, four seasons are generally recognized: spring, summer, autumn and winter. In tropical and subtropical regions, several geographical sectors do not present defined seasons; but in the seasonal tropics, the annual wet and dry seasons are recognized and tracked. A calendar year is an approximation of the number of days of the Earth's orbital period, as counted in a given calendar. The Gregorian calendar, or modern calendar, presents its calendar year to be either a common year of 365 days or a leap year of 366 days, as do the Julian calendars; ''see'' below. For the Gregorian calendar, the average length of the calendar year (the mean ye ...
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1968 Deaths
The year was highlighted by protests and other unrests that occurred worldwide. Events January * January 5 – ''Prague Spring'': Alexander Dubček is chosen as leader of the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia. * January 8 – British Prime Minister Harold Wilson endorses the ''I'm Backing Britain'' campaign for working an additional half-hour each day without pay. * January 10 – John Gorton is sworn in as the 19th Prime Minister of Australia, taking over from John McEwen after being elected leader of the Liberal Party the previous day, following the disappearance of Harold Holt. Gorton became the first and so far only Senator to become Prime Minister; though he immediately transferred to the House of Representatives through a by-election in Holt's vacant seat of Higgins. * January 14 – The Green Bay Packers defeat the Oakland Raiders by the score of 33–14 in Super Bowl II at the Miami Orange Bowl. * January 15 – An earthquake in Sicily kills 380 ...
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Academics From Greater Manchester
An academy (Attic Greek: Ἀκαδήμεια; Koine Greek Ἀκαδημία) is an institution of secondary or tertiary higher learning, research, or honorary membership. Academia is the worldwide group composed of professors and researchers at institutes of higher learning. The name traces back to Plato's school of philosophy, founded approximately 385 BC at Akademia, a sanctuary of Athena, the goddess of wisdom and skill, north of Athens, Greece. Etymology The word comes from the ''Academy'' in ancient Greece, which derives from the Athenian hero, ''Akademos''. Outside the city walls of Athens, the gymnasium was made famous by Plato as a center of learning. The sacred space, dedicated to the goddess of wisdom, Athena, had formerly been an olive grove, hence the expression "the groves of Academe". In these gardens, the philosopher Plato conversed with followers. Plato developed his sessions into a method of teaching philosophy and in 387 BC, established what is known today as t ...
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Alumni Of The University Of Manchester
An alumnus (; masculine) or an alumna (; feminine) of a college, university, or other school is a former student who has either attended or graduated in some fashion from the institution. The word is Latin and simply means ''student''. The plural is alumni for men and mixed groups and alumnae for women. The term is not synonymous with "graduate"; one can be an alumnus without graduating (Burt Reynolds, alumnus but not graduate of Florida State, is an example). The term is sometimes used to refer to a former employee or member of an organization, contributor, or inmate. Etymology The Latin noun ''alumnus'' means "foster son" or "pupil". It is derived from PIE ''*h₂el-'' (grow, nourish), and is closely related to the Latin verb ''alo'' "to nourish".Merriam-Webster: alumnus
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Separate, but from the same root, is the
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Alumni Of Trinity College, Cambridge
An alumnus (; masculine) or an alumna (; feminine) of a college, university, or other school is a former student who has either attended or graduated in some fashion from the institution. The word is Latin and simply means ''student''. The plural is alumni for men and mixed groups and alumnae for women. The term is not synonymous with "graduate"; one can be an alumnus without graduating (Burt Reynolds, alumnus but not graduate of Florida State, is an example). The term is sometimes used to refer to a former employee or member of an organization, contributor, or inmate. Etymology The Latin noun ''alumnus'' means "foster son" or "pupil". It is derived from PIE ''*h₂el-'' (grow, nourish), and is closely related to the Latin verb ''alo'' "to nourish".Merriam-Webster: alumnus
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Separate, but from the same root, is the
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British Sinologists
British may refer to: Peoples, culture, and language * British people, nationals or natives of the United Kingdom, British Overseas Territories, and Crown Dependencies. ** Britishness, the British identity and common culture * British English, the English language as spoken and written in the United Kingdom or, more broadly, throughout the British Isles * Celtic Britons, an ancient ethno-linguistic group * Brittonic languages, a branch of the Insular Celtic language family (formerly called British) ** Common Brittonic, an ancient language ** Welsh language, spoken natively in Wales * British nationality law Other uses *''Brit(ish)'', a 2018 memoir by Afua Hirsch *People or things associated with: ** Great Britain, an island ** United Kingdom, a sovereign state ** Kingdom of Great Britain (1707–1800) ** United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (1801–1922) See also * Terminology of the British Isles * Alternative names for the British * English (other) * Britannic ...
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