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Eilean Shona
Eilean Shona ( gd, Eilean Seòna) is a tidal island in Loch Moidart, Scotland. The modern name may be from the Old Norse for "sea island". The pre-Norse Gaelic name, as recorded by Adomnán was or , meaning 'foreshore island', similar to the derivation of Erraid. left, 200px, "Tioram Cottage" with Castle Tioram in background It was leased to writer J. M. Barrie in the 1920s, who used it as a summer holiday retreat for himself, his foster sons Michael and Nicholas Llewelyn Davies, and a few of their friends. It was here that he wrote a screenplay for the 1924 film adaptation of ''Peter Pan''. In 1851 there were reports of evacuations and emigrations of 37 families from the island and the nearby settlement of Dorlinn in the wake of potato blight. In 1856 the sale price of the island was just £6,500. Until the middle of the 18th century, Eilean Shona was populated with a number of crofters. The main house was a small hunting lodge owned, in the middle of the 19th century, by a seaf ...
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Inner Hebrides
The Inner Hebrides (; Scottish Gaelic: ''Na h-Eileanan a-staigh'', "the inner isles") is an archipelago off the west coast of mainland Scotland, to the south east of the Outer Hebrides. Together these two island chains form the Hebrides, which experience a mild oceanic climate. The Inner Hebrides comprise 35 inhabited islands as well as 44 uninhabited islands with an area greater than . Skye, Islay and Mull are the three largest, and also have the highest populations. The main commercial activities are tourism, crofting, fishing and whisky distilling. In modern times the Inner Hebrides have formed part of two separate local government jurisdictions, one to the north and the other to the south. Together, the islands have an area of about , and had a population of 18,948 in 2011. The population density is therefore about . There are various important prehistoric structures, many of which pre-date the first written references to the islands by Roman and Greek authors. In the hist ...
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Nicholas Llewelyn Davies
Nicholas "Nico" Llewelyn Davies (24 November 1903 – 14 October 1980) was the youngest of the Llewelyn Davies boys, who were the inspiration for J. M. Barrie's Peter Pan and the Lost Boys. He was only a year old when ''Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up'' hit the stage in 1904, and as such was not a primary inspiration for the characters of Peter and the Lost Boys. However he was eight years old when the novel adaptation ''Peter and Wendy'' was published, and in later editions of the play, the character Michael Darling's middle name was changed to "Nicholas." He was the first cousin of the English writer Daphne du Maurier. Early life When Davies was born, Barrie was already a friend of his brothers and mother Sylvia. Following the deaths of the boys' father Arthur (1907) and mother (1910), Barrie became their guardian (along with their uncles Guy du Maurier and Crompton Llewelyn Davies, and their grandmother Emma du Maurier). Two of Davies's brothers died before he ...
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