Edward Kernan
   HOME
*





Edward Kernan
Edward Kernan (born 1771 in Enniskillen, County Fermanagh, Ireland) was an Irish priest in the Diocese of Clogher ordained in 1795. He was educated at Portora Royal School, and studied for the priesthood in the Irish College in Salamanca, Spain after his ordination as was the custom of the time. He returned to Ireland in 1798 and was appointed pastor of his native town and was a popular priest and effective pastor. Bishop Kernan was appointed the Coadjutor Bishop of the Diocese of Clogher on 18 August 1816 and was ordained on 12 April 1818. He became bishop of the diocese on 19 November 1824, following the death of his predecessor, Dr James Murphy. Under his episcopal leadership St Macartan's College was founded and in his will Bishop Kernan left five hundred pound to allow the College to develop.https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0000435/18440229/041/0004 He died in office on 20 February 1844 having served as bishop of his diocese for almost twenty years. ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


picture info

Bishop Of Clogher
The Bishop of Clogher is an episcopal title which takes its name after the village of Clogher in County Tyrone, Northern Ireland. Following the Reformation, there are now parallel apostolic successions: one of the Church of Ireland and the other of the Roman Catholic Church. History Clogher is one of the twenty-four dioceses established at the Synod of RĂ¡th Breasail in 1111 and consists of much of south west Ulster, taking in most of counties Fermanagh and Monaghan and parts of Tyrone, Cavan, Leitrim and Donegal. Frequently in the Irish annals the Bishop of Clogher was styled the ''Bishop of Oirialla''. Between c. 1140 to c. 1190, County Louth was transferred from the see of Armagh to the see of Clogher. During this period the Bishop of Clogher used the style ''Bishop of Louth''. The title ''Bishop of Clogher'' was resumed after 1193, when County Louth was restored to the see of Armagh. Present Ordinaries ;In the Church of Ireland The present Church of Ireland bishop is t ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


picture info

Carrickmacross
Carrickmacross () is a town in County Monaghan, Ireland. The town and environs had a population of 5,032 according to the 2016 census, making it the second-largest town in the county. Carrickmacross is a market town which developed around a castle built by the Earl of Essex in 1630. The town won the European Entente Florale Silver Medal Award in 1998. The local Gaelic football and hurling club is Carrickmacross Emmets. The local soccer team is Carrick Rovers. History Foundation and development Carrickmacross is a market town which developed around a castle built by the Earl of Essex in 1630. The Convent of St Louis now stands on the original castle site, as the castle itself was destroyed in the late 17th century during the Williamite Wars. The town developed further as a market town during the 18th century, and a number of large municipal and religious buildings were built to serve the growing population during the 19th century. The town experienced population decline in mid- ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


picture info

19th-century Roman Catholic Bishops In Ireland
The 19th (nineteenth) century began on 1 January 1801 ( MDCCCI), and ended on 31 December 1900 ( MCM). The 19th century was the ninth century of the 2nd millennium. The 19th century was characterized by vast social upheaval. Slavery was abolished in much of Europe and the Americas. The First Industrial Revolution, though it began in the late 18th century, expanding beyond its British homeland for the first time during this century, particularly remaking the economies and societies of the Low Countries, the Rhineland, Northern Italy, and the Northeastern United States. A few decades later, the Second Industrial Revolution led to ever more massive urbanization and much higher levels of productivity, profit, and prosperity, a pattern that continued into the 20th century. The Islamic gunpowder empires fell into decline and European imperialism brought much of South Asia, Southeast Asia, and almost all of Africa under colonial rule. It was also marked by the collapse of the large S ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  



MORE