Canada Business Corporations Act
   HOME
*





Canada Business Corporations Act
The ''Canada Business Corporations Act'' (CBCA; french: Loi canadienne sur les sociétés par actions) is an act of the Parliament of Canada regulating Canadian business corporations. Corporations in Canada may be incorporated federally, under the CBCA, or provincially under a similar provincial law. Background The act was legislated based on a report by a task force organized in 1967 to provide the first comprehensive review of federal corporate law since 1934. It received royal assent on 24 March 1975, and came into force on 15 December 1975. It provides the basic corporate governance framework for many small and medium-sized Canadian enterprises as well as many of the largest corporations operating in Canada. Nearly 235,000 companies are incorporated under the act, including over 700 distributing or publicly held corporations. CBCA corporations make up approximately 50 percent of Canada's largest publicly traded business corporations. As of June 25, 2019, the act was amende ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


picture info

Parliament Of Canada
The Parliament of Canada (french: Parlement du Canada) is the federal legislature of Canada, seated at Parliament Hill in Ottawa, and is composed of three parts: the King, the Senate, and the House of Commons. By constitutional convention, the House of Commons is dominant, with the Senate rarely opposing its will. The Senate reviews legislation from a less partisan standpoint and may initiate certain bills. The monarch or his representative, normally the governor general, provides royal assent to make bills into law. The governor general, on behalf of the monarch, summons and appoints the 105 senators on the advice of the prime minister, while each of the 338 members of the House of Commons – called members of Parliament (MPs) – represents an electoral district, commonly referred to as a ''riding'', and are elected by Canadian voters residing in the riding. The governor general also summons and calls together the House of Commons, and may prorogue or dissolve Parliament, ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


Canadian Corporation
Canadian corporate law concerns the operation of corporations in Canada, which can be established under either federal or provincial authority. Federal incorporation of for-profit corporations is governed by Corporations Canada under the ''Canada Business Corporations Act''. All of the Canadian provinces and territories also have laws permitting (and governing) the incorporation of corporations within their area of jurisdiction. Often, the choice of whether to incorporate federally or provincially will be based on many business considerations, such as scope of business and the desire for application of particular rules which may be available under one corporate statute but not another. History Prior to Canadian Confederation, companies were organized through several procedures: :* through contract as a partnership or unincorporated company :* through royal charter, as was done for the Hudson's Bay Company :* through an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, as for the Can ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


picture info

Ottawa Law Review
The University of Ottawa Faculty of Law (''French: Faculté de droit de l'Université d'Ottawa)'' is the law school at the University of Ottawa, located in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Established in 1953, the Faculty is today divided into Civil Law and Common Law sections, the two formally recognized legal traditions in Canada. The law school has produced a diverse array of successful alumni. These include the current Chief Justice of Canada and deans of several law schools including the Civil Law Section at the University of Ottawa. The Faculty is home to several specialist centres. The faculty is very highly rated and maintains close links with the legal communities in Quebec, Ontario, and abroad. The Faculty of Law is also home to two elite bilingual law journals, one produced by the civil law section and the other produced by the common law section, ''which have significantly contributed to the development of law by the Supreme Court of Canada''. History The law school was e ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


picture info

Royal Assent
Royal assent is the method by which a monarch formally approves an act of the legislature, either directly or through an official acting on the monarch's behalf. In some jurisdictions, royal assent is equivalent to promulgation, while in others that is a separate step. Under a modern constitutional monarchy, royal assent is considered little more than a formality. Even in nations such as the United Kingdom, Norway, the Netherlands, Liechtenstein and Monaco which still, in theory, permit their monarch to withhold assent to laws, the monarch almost never does so, except in a dire political emergency or on advice of government. While the power to veto by withholding royal assent was once exercised often by European monarchs, such an occurrence has been very rare since the eighteenth century. Royal assent is typically associated with elaborate ceremony. In the United Kingdom the Sovereign may appear personally in the House of Lords or may appoint Lords Commissioners, who announce ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


Canada Gazette
The ''Canada Gazette'' (french: Gazette du Canada) is the official government gazette of the Government of Canada. It was first published on October 2, 1841. While it originally published all acts of the Parliament of Canada, it later also published treaties, hearing and tribunals, proclamations and regulations, and various other official notices as required. At one time it contained information on bankruptcies. It has been administered by Public Works and Government Services Canada and the King's Printer for Canada since 1841. The ''Gazette'' is most often read to find new acts, regulations and proclamations. Legal status While not always widely read by the public, publication in the ''Gazette'' is considered official notice to all Canadians. After a regulation has been approved by the Privy Council Office and then the Cabinet of Canada, the regulation is published in the ''Gazette''. If a regulation has not been published in the ''Gazette'', a person cannot be convicted of ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


picture info

Canadian Company Law
Canadians (french: Canadiens) are people identified with the country of Canada. This connection may be residential, legal, historical or cultural. For most Canadians, many (or all) of these connections exist and are collectively the source of their being ''Canadian''. Canada is a multilingual and multicultural society home to people of groups of many different ethnic, religious, and national origins, with the majority of the population made up of Old World immigrants and their descendants. Following the initial period of French and then the much larger British colonization, different waves (or peaks) of immigration and settlement of non-indigenous peoples took place over the course of nearly two centuries and continue today. Elements of Indigenous, French, British, and more recent immigrant customs, languages, and religions have combined to form the culture of Canada, and thus a Canadian identity. Canada has also been strongly influenced by its linguistic, geographic, and eco ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  




List Of Acts Of Parliament Of Canada
This is an incomplete list of the continuing Acts of the Parliament of Canada. Many of these Acts have had one or more amending Acts. 1867 – 1899 * ''Aliens and Naturalization Act'', 1868 * ''Fisheries Act'', 1868 * ''Gradual Enfranchisement Act'', 1869 * ''Manitoba Act'', 1870 * ''Bank Act'', 1871 * ''Dominion Lands Act,'' 1872 * '' Supreme and Exchequer Courts Act,'' 1875 * ''Indian Act,'' 1876 * ''Canada Temperance Act,'' 1878 * ''Naturalization and Aliens Act,'' 1881 * ''Chinese Immigration Act,'' 1885 * ''Rocky Mountains Park Act'', 1887 * ''Criminal Code,'' 1892 * ''Canada Evidence Act'', 1893 * '' Quebec Boundary Extension Act,'' 1898 1900 – 1929 * ''Alberta Act,'' 1905 * ''Saskatchewan Act,'' 1905 * ''Juvenile Delinquents Act,'' 1908 * ''Immigration Act,'' 1910 * ''Naval Service Act'', 1910 * '' Quebec Boundaries Extension Act,'' 1912 * ''Finance Act,'' 1914 * ''Naturalization Act,'' 1914 * ''War Measures Act,'' 1914 * '' Military Service Act'', 1917 * ' ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


picture info

Canadian Federal Legislation
Canadians (french: Canadiens) are people identified with the country of Canada. This connection may be residential, legal, historical or cultural. For most Canadians, many (or all) of these connections exist and are collectively the source of their being ''Canadian''. Canada is a multilingual and multicultural society home to people of groups of many different ethnic, religious, and national origins, with the majority of the population made up of Old World immigrants and their descendants. Following the initial period of French and then the much larger British colonization, different waves (or peaks) of immigration and settlement of non-indigenous peoples took place over the course of nearly two centuries and continue today. Elements of Indigenous, French, British, and more recent immigrant customs, languages, and religions have combined to form the culture of Canada, and thus a Canadian identity. Canada has also been strongly influenced by its linguistic, geographic, and e ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


Canadian Corporate Law
Canadian corporate law concerns the operation of corporations in Canada, which can be established under either federal or provincial authority. Federal incorporation of for-profit corporations is governed by Corporations Canada under the ''Canada Business Corporations Act''. All of the Canadian provinces and territories also have laws permitting (and governing) the incorporation of corporations within their area of jurisdiction. Often, the choice of whether to incorporate federally or provincially will be based on many business considerations, such as scope of business and the desire for application of particular rules which may be available under one corporate statute but not another. History Prior to Canadian Confederation, companies were organized through several procedures: :* through contract as a partnership or unincorporated company :* through royal charter, as was done for the Hudson's Bay Company :* through an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, as for the Ca ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]