HOME TheInfoList
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff


picture info

Anime Eye
is hand-drawn and computer animation originating from Japan. In Japan and in Japanese, (a term derived from the English word ''animation'') describes all animated works, regardless of style or origin. However, outside of Japan and in English, ''anime'' is colloquial for ''Japanese animation'' and refers specifically to animation produced in Japan. Animation produced outside of Japan with similar style to Japanese animation is referred to as ''anime-influenced animation''. The earliest commercial Japanese animations date to 1917. A characteristic art style emerged in the 1960s with the works of cartoonist Osamu Tezuka and spread in following decades, developing a large domestic audience. Anime is distributed theatrically, through television broadcasts, directly to home media, and over the Internet. In addition to original works, anime are often adaptations of Japanese comics (manga), light novels, or video games. It is classified into numerous genres targeting various broad a ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Traditional Animation
on the reverse side of an already inked cel. Traditional animation (or classical animation, cel animation, hand-drawn animation, 2D animation or just 2D) is an animation technique in which each frame is drawn by hand. The technique was the dominant form of animation in cinema until the advent of computer animation. Process Animation production usually begins after a story is conceived. The oral or literary source material must then be converted into an animation film script, from which the storyboard is derived. The storyboard has an appearance somewhat similar to comic book panels, and is a shot by shot breakdown of the staging, acting and any camera moves that will be present in the film. The images allow the animation team to plan the flow of the plot and the composition of the imagery. The storyboard artists will have regular meetings with the director and may have to redraw or "re-board" a sequence many times before it meets final approval. Voice recording Before true ani ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Toei Animation
() is a Japanese animation studio primarily controlled by its namesake Toei Company. It has produced numerous series, including ''Sally the Witch,'' ''Gegege no Kitaro,'' ''Mazinger Z'', ''Galaxy Express 999'', ''Dr. Slump'', ''Dragon Ball'', ''Saint Seiya'', ''Sailor Moon'', ''Slam Dunk'', ''Digimon'', ''One Piece'', ''The Transformers'' (1984–1990, including several Japanese exclusive productions) and the ''Precure'' series. History The studio was founded by animators Kenzō Masaoka and Zenjirō Yamamoto in 1948 as . In 1956, Toei purchased the studio and it was renamed , doing business as Toei Animation Co., Ltd. outside Japan. In 1998, the Japanese name was renamed to Toei Animation. It has created a number of TV series and movies and adapted Japanese comics as animated series, many popular worldwide. Hayao Miyazaki, Isao Takahata, Yasuji Mori, Leiji Matsumoto and Yoichi Kotabe have worked with the company. Toei is a shareholder in the Japanese anime satellite television net ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



American Heritage Dictionary
American(s) may refer to: * American, something of, from, or related to the United States of America, commonly known as the United States ** Americans, citizens and nationals of the United States of America ** American ancestry, people who self-identify their ancestry as "American" ** American English, the set of varieties of the English language native to the United States ** Native Americans in the United States, indigenous peoples of the United States * American, something of, from, or related to the Americas ** Indigenous peoples of the Americas * American (word), for analysis and history of the meanings in various contexts Organizations * American Airlines * American Recordings (record label), a record label previously known as Def American * American University, in Washington, D.C. Sports teams * Allen Americans, a minor league hockey team * Baltimore Americans, the name of two soccer teams, one from 1939 to 1942 and one from 1942 to 1948 * Boston Red Sox, a baseball team ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Mass Noun
In linguistics, a mass noun, uncountable noun, or non-count noun is a noun with the syntactic property that any quantity of it is treated as an undifferentiated unit, rather than as something with discrete elements. Non-count nouns are distinguished from count nouns. Given that different languages have different grammatical features, the actual test for which nouns are mass nouns may vary between languages. In English, mass nouns are characterized by the fact that they cannot be directly modified by a numeral without specifying a unit of measurement, and that they cannot combine with an indefinite article (''a'' or ''an''). Thus, the mass noun "water" is quantified as "20 litres of water" while the count noun "chair" is quantified as "20 chairs". However, both mass and count nouns can be quantified in relative terms without unit specification (e.g., "so much water", "so many chairs"). Mass nouns have no concept of singular and plural, although in English they take singular verb ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Noun
A noun (from Latin ''nōmen'', literally ''name'') is a word that functions as the name of a specific object or set of objects, such as living creatures, places, actions, qualities, states of existence, or ideas.Example nouns for: * Living creatures (including people, alive, dead or imaginary): ''mushrooms, dogs, Afro-Caribbeans, rosebushes, Nelson Mandela, bacteria, Klingons'', etc. * Physical objects: ''hammers, pencils, Earth, guitars, atoms, stones, boots, shadows'', etc. * Places: ''closets, temples, rivers, Antarctica, houses, Grand Canyon, utopia'', etc. * Actions: ''swimming, exercises, diffusions, explosions, flight, electrification, embezzlement'', etc. * Qualities: ''colors, lengths, deafness, weights, roundness, symmetry, warp speed,'' etc. * Mental or physical states of existence: ''jealousy, sleep, heat, joy, stomachache, confusion, mind meld,'' etc. * Ideas or abstract entities: ''musicianship, cooperativeness, perfection, ''The New York Times'', mathematics, imposs ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Katakana
is a Japanese syllabary, one component of the Japanese writing system along with hiragana, kanji and in some cases the Latin script (known as rōmaji). The word ''katakana'' means "fragmentary kana", as the katakana characters are derived from components or fragments of more complex kanji. Katakana and hiragana are both kana systems. With one or two minor exceptions, each syllable (strictly mora) in the Japanese language is represented by one character or ''kana'', in each system. Each kana represents either a vowel such as "''a''" (katakana ア); a consonant followed by a vowel such as "''ka''" (katakana カ); or "''n''" (katakana ン), a nasal sonorant which, depending on the context, sounds either like English ''m'', ''n'' or ''ng'' () or like the nasal vowels of Portuguese or Galician. In contrast to the hiragana syllabary, which is used for Japanese words not covered by kanji and for grammatical inflections, the katakana syllabary usage is quite similar to italics in English ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Merriam-Webster
Merriam-Webster, Inc., is an American company that publishes reference books and is especially known for its dictionaries. In 1831, George and Charles Merriam founded the company as G & C Merriam Co. in Springfield, Massachusetts. In 1843, after Noah Webster died, the company bought the rights to ''An American Dictionary of the English Language'' from Webster's estate. All Merriam-Webster dictionaries trace their lineage to this source. In 1964, Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., acquired Merriam-Webster, Inc., as a subsidiary. The company adopted its current name in 1982. Origins Noah Webster In 1806, Webster published his first dictionary, ''A Compendious Dictionary of the English Language''. In 1807 Webster started two decades of intensive work to expand his publication into a fully comprehensive dictionary, ''An American Dictionary of the English Language''. To help him trace the etymology of words, Webster learned 26 languages. Webster hoped to standardize American speech, si ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Oxford University Press
Oxford University Press (OUP) is the university press of University of Oxford. It is the largest university press in the world, and the second oldest after Cambridge University Press. It is a department of the University of Oxford and is governed by a group of 15 academics appointed by the vice-chancellor known as the delegates of the press. They are headed by the secretary to the delegates, who serves as OUP's chief executive and as its major representative on other university bodies. Oxford University Press has had a similar governance structure since the 17th century. The Press is located on Walton Street, Oxford, opposite Somerville College, in the inner suburb of Jericho. Early history The university became involved in the print trade around 1480, and grew into a major printer of Bibles, prayer books, and scholarly works. OUP took on the project that became the ''Oxford English Dictionary'' in the late 19th century, and expanded to meet the ever-rising costs of the work. A ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Lexico
Lexico is a website that provides a collection of dictionaries of English and Spanish produced by Oxford University Press (OUP), the publishing house of the University of Oxford. While the dictionaries on Lexico are made solely by OUP, the website is owned by Dictionary.com, whose eponymous website hosts dictionaries by other publishers such as Random House. The dictionaries were previously hosted by OUP's own website, Oxford Dictionaries Online (ODO), later known as Oxford Living Dictionaries. The dictionaries' definitions appear in Google definition search, the Dictionary application on macOS, etc., licensed through Oxford Dictionaries API. History In the 2000s, OUP allowed access to content of the ''Compact Oxford English Dictionary of Current English'' on a website called AskOxford.com. In 2010, Oxford Dictionaries Online was launched under oxforddictionaries.com, superseding the dictionary content of AskOxford.com. Buyers of the third edition of the ''Oxford Dictionary of ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Cambridge English Dictionary
''Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary'' 3rd Edition CD-ROM The ''Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary'' (unofficially ''Cambridge English Dictionary'' or ''Cambridge Dictionary'', abbreviated ''CALD'') was first published in 1995 under the name ''Cambridge International Dictionary of English'', by the Cambridge University Press. The dictionary has over 140,000 words, phrases, and meanings. It is suitable for learners at CEF levels B2-C2. Editions *First edition first published in 2003. *Second edition first published in 2005. *Third edition first published in 2008. *Fourth edition first published in 2013. See also *Advanced learner's dictionary External links * Category: English dictionaries {{Dictionary-stub ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Genre
Genre () is any form or type of communication in any mode (written, spoken, digital, artistic, etc.) with socially-agreed-upon conventions developed over time. In popular usage, it normally describes a category of literature, music, or other forms of art or entertainment, whether written or spoken, audio or visual, based on some set of stylistic criteria, yet genres can be aesthetic, rhetorical, communicative, or functional. Genres form by conventions that change over time as cultures invent new genres and discontinue the use of old ones. Often, works fit into multiple genres by way of borrowing and recombining these conventions. Stand-alone texts, works, or pieces of communication may have individual styles, but genres are amalgams of these texts based on agreed-upon or socially inferred conventions. Some genres may have rigid, strictly adhered-to guidelines, while others may show great flexibility. Genre began as an absolute classification system for ancient Greek literature, as ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Animation
Animation is a method in which figures are manipulated to appear as moving images. In traditional animation, images are drawn or painted by hand on transparent celluloid sheets to be photographed and exhibited on film. Today, most animations are made with computer-generated imagery (CGI). Computer animation can be very detailed 3D animation, while 2D computer animation (which may have the look of traditional animation) can be used for stylistic reasons, low bandwidth, or faster real-time renderings. Other common animation methods apply a stop motion technique to two and three-dimensional objects like paper cutouts, puppets, or clay figures. Commonly, the effect of animation is achieved by a rapid succession of sequential images that minimally differ from each other. The illusion—as in motion pictures in general—is thought to rely on the phi phenomenon and beta movement, but the exact causes are still uncertain. Analog mechanical animation media that rely on the rapid display ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Animated Series
An animated series is a set of animated works with a common series title, usually related to one another. These episodes should typically share the same main characters, some different secondary characters and a basic theme. Series can have either a finite number of episodes like a miniseries, a definite end, or be open-ended, without a predetermined number of episodes. They can be broadcast on television, shown in movie theatres, released direct-to-video or on the internet. Like animated films, animated series can be of a wide variety of genres and can also have different demographic target audiences, from males to females ranging children to adults. Television Animated television series are regularly presented and can appear as much as up to once a week or daily during a prescribed time slot. The time slot may vary including morning, like saturday-morning cartoons, prime time, like prime time cartoons, to late night, like late night anime. They may also be broadcast on weekdays ( ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Subtitles
Subtitles are text derived from either a transcript or screenplay of the dialogue or commentary in films, television programs, video games, and the like, usually displayed at the bottom of the screen, but can also be at the top of the screen if there is already text at the bottom of the screen. They can either be a form of written translation of a dialogue in a foreign language, or a written rendering of the dialogue in the same language, with or without added information to help viewers who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, who cannot understand the spoken language, or who have accent recognition problems to follow the dialogue. The encoded method can either be pre-rendered with the video or separate as either a graphic or text to be rendered and overlaid by the receiver. The separate subtitles are used for DVD, Blu-ray and television teletext/Digital Video Broadcasting (DVB) subtitling or EIA-608 captioning, which are hidden unless requested by the viewer from a menu or remote con ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Dubbing (filmmaking)
Dubbing, mixing or re-recording, is a post-production process used in filmmaking and video production in which additional or supplementary recordings are lip-synced and "mixed" with original production sound to create the finished soundtrack. The process usually takes place on a dub stage. After sound editors edit and prepare all the necessary tracks – dialogue, automated dialogue replacement (ADR), effects, Foley, music – the dubbing mixers proceed to balance all of the elements and record the finished soundtrack. Dubbing is sometimes confused with ADR, also known as "additional dialogue replacement", "automated dialogue recording" and "looping", in which the original actors re-record and synchronize audio segments. Outside the film industry, the term "dubbing" commonly refers to the replacement of the actor's voices with those of different performers speaking another language, which is called "revoicing" in the film industry. Origins Films, videos, and sometimes video gam ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]